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Stephen Daldry Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trade Mark (5) | Trivia (17) | Personal Quotes (6)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 2 May 1960Dorset, England, UK
Birth NameStephen David Daldry
Height 6' 2" (1.88 m)

Mini Bio (1)

In 1989, Stephen Daldry worked as a freelance reader of unsolicited manuscripts for Literary Manager Nicholas Wright in the Scripts Department at the Royal National Theatre. In July of that year, he directed a Dadaist/expressionist production of "Judgement Day," a play by Odon von Horvath, at the Old Red Lion in London.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Doug Rose

Spouse (1)

Lucy Sexton (18 October 2001 - present) (1 child)

Trade Mark (5)

Films generally focus on female characters played by well-known actresses (Nicole Kidman in _The Hours_, Kate Winslet in _The Reader_)
Frequently collaborates with screenwriter 'David Hare'
Films generally feature two or more main characters from different generations ('Thomas Horn' and 'Max von Sydow' in _Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close_, Kate Winslet and 'David Cross' in _The Reader_, the three primary female leads of _The Hours_)
His films often contain a character who tries to seek some form of redemption, often with the help of another character
His films usually receive multiple Oscar nominations, regardless of their critical reception

Trivia (17)

Ranked #92 in Premiere's 2003 annual Power 100 List. It is his first appearance on the list.
Unofficially adopted aspiring actor Jamie Bell whilst shooting Billy Elliot (2000).
His wife Lucy gave birth to their first child, a daughter named Annabel Clare. The baby was born in May 2003.
He was awarded the CBE (Commander of the Order of the British Empire) in the 2004 New Year's Honours List for his services to Drama.
He was awarded the Laurence Olivier Theatre Award in 1994 (1993 season) for Best Director of a Play for Machinal at the Royal National Theatre.
He was awarded the Laurence Olivier Theatre Award in 1993 (1992 season) for Best Director for a Play for An Inspector Calls at the Royal National Theatre.
He was awarded the 1992 London Evening Standard Theatre Award for Best Director for An Inspector Calls.
He was awarded the 1992 London Critics Circle Theatre Award (Drama Theatre Award) for Best Director for An Inspector Calls.
Won Broadway's 1994 Tony Award as Best Director (Play) for "An Inspector Calls."
Has directed 6 actors in Oscar-nominated performances: Julie Walters, Nicole Kidman, Ed Harris, Julianne Moore, Kate Winslet, and Max von Sydow. Kidman and Winslet both won Oscars for performances in one of his movies.
Graduated from the University of Sheffield and completed an apprenticeship at the city's Crucible Theatre.
Received an Oscar-nomination as Best Director for his first three movies: Billy Elliot (2000), The Hours (2002) and The Reader (2008). He is the first (and as of 2009, the only) person ever to accomplish this.
He was awarded the 2009 Tony Award for Director of a Musical for "Billy Elliott" on Broadway in New York City.
Won Broadway's 2009 Tony Award as Best Director (Musical) for "Billy Elliot".
Was in a relationship with Ian MacNeil for 13 years. They met in 1988 at an outdoor production of Alice in Wonderland directed by their mutual friend Ian Forest.
Mayfair, London, England [May 2009]
He was awarded the 1996 Drama Logue Award for Direction for "An Inspector Calls," in the Royal National Theatre production at the Ahmanson Theatre in Los Angeles, California.

Personal Quotes (6)

"What's so funny is when people say, 'Oh, does that mean you're not gay anymore?' And you go, 'Oh, give me a break. What do you mean?' We wanted to have kids! We thought we'd get married and have kids. We're allowed to do everything. I refuse to be boxed in to the idea that 'Oh, no, I can't have kids 'cause I'm gay.' I can have kids if I'm gay. And I can also get married and have a fantastic life...To all questions [having to do] with my marriage, the answer to everything is yes. Do I have sex with my wife? Yes. Is it a real marriage? Yes. Am I gay? Yes." (quoted in The Advocate after the birth of his daughter Annabel Clare)
One of the great things about directors is how collegial we feel with each other. We share huge amounts - I get other directors in to see my work all the time and they do the same with me. It's a very warm and generous group of people.
When I made Billy Elliot, people asked me, "Oh, did you want to be a dancer when you were young, then?" I didn't even like dance before I made the film. "Do you come from the north-east?" No, Somerset. "Is it based on someone?" No. We made it up. We just made it up. The act of making something up seems to be very difficult these days.
I get frustrated about it because they say, "How can a man talk about women? I say, "Steven Spielberg didn't need to be an alien to talk about ET. You don't need to be a dog to direct Lassie. It seems to be a denial of the process of imagination, which is a posh word for "guesswork" [on 'The Hours']
They never met. We shot Meryl first, then Julianne, then Nicole. The first time they got together was on the Oprah Winfrey show and talked about cornflakes. [on 'The Hours']
[One afternoon in 1989, in the Scripts Department of the Royal National Theatre, the young Daldry expressed his frustration at trying to find regular work in London] I'm not trendy enough to get a job as a bicycle messenger.

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