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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

7 items from 2017


Horror Highlights: The Endless, Tilt, Calculating Euphoria, Ghost Hug

25 April 2017 7:22 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Fresh off the Tribeca Film Festival lineup, The Endless and Tilt both have teasers that are sure to pique your interest. We also have Indiegogo campaign details for Calculating Euphoria and the Ghost Hug figure release details.

New Promo Video for The Endless: "The Endless is the story of two brothers who return to the deal cult from which they fled a decade ago, to find that there might be some truth to the group’s otherworldly beliefs."

Directed by and starring Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead, The Endless also features Tate Ellington, James Jordan, Shane Brady, and Kira Powell. To learn more about

To learn more about The Endless and its screenings at Tribeca, visit:

https://tribecafilm.com/filmguide/endless-2017

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A Look at the Tilt Teaser: "All seems normal with Joseph and Joanne. Joanne is pregnant with their first child. Life in their little urban house is cozy and familiar. »

- Tamika Jones

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Tilt Review [Tribeca 2017]

24 April 2017 9:43 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

As some films have gained new meaning under the Donald Trump regime (Always Shine, for example), Kasra Farahani’s Tilt was fully realized to be a knee-jerk reaction. No subtlety, all retaliation. They say that good genre films echo societal landscapes, and Farahani certainly holds nothing back – yet pregnancy paranoias and a crumbling America represent clashing narratives. Farahani works to splice their meanings, but parallel influences might have worked even better as two separate films. Go full angsty liberal or all father-in-fear. No reason to steal the other’s thunder.

Joseph Cross stars as Joseph Burns, a documentary filmmaker and hopeful parent-to-be. He’s just moved into a new house with wife Joanne (Alexia Rasmussen), where they begin their baby preparation months in advance. Joseph also hopes to wrap his latest project, Golden Age, which details the demise of our beloved “American Dream.” But with a baby on the way, »

- Matt Donato

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Tribeca Review: ‘Tilt’ is an Intriguing, But Heavy-Handed Psychological Thriller

23 April 2017 6:16 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

If only we could go back to the days when mid-life crises happened at fifty-years old and at best meant buying an expensive car (at worst asking for divorce to marry younger). Now this existential breakdown occurs much earlier — let’s say thirty-years old. This is what happens when millennials are born of an era with more time to think about their futures. Rather than needing to buckle down and secure a career straight out of college, your drive for the “best fit” leads to multiple wrong turns and changes of heart until adulthood can’t help but slap you in the face via financial burden, familial responsibility, and waning energy. Even so, I never anticipated this infamous rite of passage would eventually include homicidal tendencies. Welcome to Trump’s America.

Or I should say welcome to Kasra Farahani‘s metaphor for Trump’s America entitled Tilt. I think that »

- Jared Mobarak

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‘Tilt’ Teaser: Creepy Tribeca Midnight Pick Asks How Well You Really Know the People You Love — Watch

20 April 2017 7:45 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Typically, you’d expect there to be a clear and open line of communication with a best friend or significant other, but people always maintain a certain degree of privacy — which is healthy, as long as privacy doesn’t develop into secrecy. That’s at the heart of Kasra Farahani’s “Tilt,” debuting at this month’s Tribeca Film Festival as part of their ambitious Midnight section.

How well do you really know someone? “Tilt” has some ideas, and most of them are shocking indeed.

Read More: Tribeca 2017 Short Film Lineup: Elisabeth Moss, Kobe Bryant, Mae Whitman and More Lend Their Talents to This Year’s Program

Per the film’s official synopsis: “All seems normal with Joseph and Joanne. Joanne is pregnant with their first child. Life in their little urban house is cozy and familiar. But something is off about Joseph. He doesn’t seem excited about the baby. »

- Kerry Levielle

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‘Big Little Lies’ Finale Review: Now That’s How You End a Murder Mystery

2 April 2017 6:59 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “Big Little Lies” Episode 7, “You Get What You Need.”]

The “Big Little Lies” finale can be neatly broken up into two parts: brutally teasing motivations for murder and letting suspects off the hook. Much of the tightly wound episode’s opening was spent playfully foreshadowing events to come, as fights were picked (Madeline and Joseph, Gordon and Tom) and suggestive lines were delivered. (A favorite: Celeste’s therapist saying, “It’s one thing he could kill you, but god forbid you miss a party.”)

Well, joke’s on you, therapist lady: Perry’s the one who got got! While director Jean-Marc Vallée and writer David E. Kelley waited until the final minutes to reveal who died and who did it, “You Get What You Need” gave us exactly what we needed to figure things out as the night’s events unfolded. Each character was given a moment of absolute guilt or absolute innocence, so that we were well-prepared for the dramatic unveiling. »

- Ben Travers

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‘Big Little Lies’ Finale Review: Now That’s How You End a Murder Mystery

2 April 2017 6:59 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “Big Little Lies” Episode 7, “You Get What You Need.”]

The “Big Little Lies” finale can be neatly broken up into two parts: brutally teasing motivations for murder and letting suspects off the hook. Much of the tightly wound episode’s opening was spent playfully foreshadowing events to come, as fights were picked (Madeline and Joseph, Gordon and Tom) and suggestive lines were delivered. (A favorite: Celeste’s therapist saying, “It’s one thing he could kill you, but god forbid you miss a party.”)

Well, joke’s on you, therapist lady: Perry’s the one who got got! While director Jean-Marc Vallée and writer David E. Kelley waited until the final minutes to reveal who died and who did it, “You Get What You Need” gave us exactly what we needed to figure things out as the night’s events unfolded. Each character was given a moment of absolute guilt or absolute innocence, so that we were well-prepared for the dramatic unveiling. »

- Ben Travers

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Tribeca Film Festival 2017 Midnight Lineup Includes Mickey Keating’s Psychopaths

3 March 2017 1:28 PM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

The 16th annual Tribeca Film Festival kicks off this April in New York, and horror fans attending the cinematic gathering have plenty of titles to look forward to, including the world premiere of Mickey Keating's Psychopaths.

From the Press Release: "Tribeca’s Midnight section is the destination for late night audiences to discover the best in psychological thriller, horror, sci-fi, and cult cinema. This year’s six selections offer new genre experiences for even the most extreme viewer.

Devil's Gate, directed by Clay Staub, written by Peter Aperlo, Clay Staub. (Canada, USA) - World Premiere, Narrative. Struggling to overcome a recent professional tragedy, a tough-as-nails FBI agent (Amanda Schull) relocates to a small North Dakota town to investigate the disappearance of a local woman and her young son. The search leads to the missing woman’s husband’s (Milo Ventimiglia) secluded farm, on which answers, new mysteries, and God-fearing terrors await. »

- Derek Anderson

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

7 items from 2017


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