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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

1-20 of 39 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


At Lincoln Center: Pedro Costa and His War on Narrative Film

29 July 2015 8:56 PM, PDT | www.culturecatch.com | See recent CultureCatch news »

In 1997, Pedro Costa (above), at the age of 38, began a trilogy exploring Portugal's impoverished, an undertaking that would continuously draw raves from the more erudite critics around the world. First came Ossos, which was pursued by In Vanda's Room (2000) and Colossal Youth (2006). These films, often showcasing the same characters, are sublimely visual, meditative masterworks that paint within shadows the seemingly plotless lives of the drug-addled inhabitants of a ghetto that is slowly being dismantled.

The Film Society of Lincoln Center last week had a retrospective of these early works plus other tidbits of Costa's oeuvre, a sort of celluloid foreplay leading to the release of Costa's latest effort,  Horse Money. The accompanying press release for this tribute notes that "Costa is now widely regarded as one of the most important artists on the international film scene," and the Film Society's Director of Programming, Dennis Lim, added, "Simply put, nobody makes »

- Brandon Judell

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Daily | Kubrick, Schrader, Duplasses

26 July 2015 9:07 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Hey, it's Stanley Kubrick's birthday. As it happens, the BFI has just posted an edited extract from the introduction to the new collection, Stanley Kubrick: New Perspectives. Also in today's roundup: Madison Brookshire on Josef von Sternberg and Jack Smith by way of Gilles Deleuze; interviews with Pedro Costa (conducted by David Barker and Matthew Porterfield), Bruno Dumont, Barbara Kopple, Paul Schrader and "illustrator, concept artist and visual futurist" Syd Mead; Anna Shechtman on James Ponsoldt's The End of the Tour and the David Foster Wallace Industry; news of Fatih Akin's next project; and remembering producer Pierre Cottrell. » - David Hudson »

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Review: Pedro Costa's Metaphysical 'Horse Money'

24 July 2015 3:25 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

After a lengthy absence from the slums of Fontainhas, the physical setting of his trilogy on impoverished marginalized humanity personified by Cape Verdean immigrants —"Ossos" (1997), "In Vanda's Room" (2000), "Colossal Youth" (2006)— Portuguese filmmaker Pedro Costa returns with "Horse Money." We re-connect with Ventura, the window to the souls of 'youth,' who appears physically and psychologically drained since we've last seen him, resting peacefully on Vanda's bed. The familiarity of the setting, Ventura's screen presence as magnanimous and magnetic as ever, and Costa's pictorial mise-en-scène, are stalwart reminders of the same universe. But something is undeniably, remarkably and a touch frighteningly different in the air. "Horse Money" is situated on some metaphysical plane, twice removed from the ramshackle physicality of its three predecessors, but through Ventura, newcomer Vitalina, a stupendous musical montage and a »

- Nikola Grozdanovic

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Daily | 25 New Faces, Robbe-Grillet

24 July 2015 10:57 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Trey Edward Shults (Krisha) and Britni West (Tired Moonlight) are among the "25 New Faces of Independent Film" Filmmaker has chosen to highlight this year. Also in today's roundup: Film International on Peter Bogdanovich and Ken Loach; David Cairns on Alain Robbe-Grillet; an interview with Patrick McGilligan, author of, most recently, biographies of Orson Welles and Clint Eastwood; more interviews with Pedro Costa, Shinya Tsukamoto, Judd Apatow, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Parker Posey; Film Comment on Frank Sinatra; and news of upcoming premieres in Venice (Scott Cooper's Black Mass) and New York (Don Cheadle's Miles Ahead). » - David Hudson »

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Standing on Opposite Sides of the Road: Pedro Costa on Horse Money

24 July 2015 10:39 AM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Locating himself far from the mainstream of even international art cinema, Pedro Costa is widely regarded as one of the most important artists on the international film scene. Born in 1959, he was already a successful filmmaker when he began to feel, on the set of his third feature Ossos (1997), that something was wrong with the normal way of making films: “We should rethink all of it,” he thought. Jettisoning his professional crew, he made In Vanda’s Room (2000), shot by a one-person crew on a consumer mini-dv camera in Lisbon’s Fountainhas ghetto over the course a year. A […] »

- David Barker and Matthew Porterfield

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Review: Horse Money, Beautiful, Mesmerizing, And Striking

24 July 2015 9:00 AM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

Horse Money is astonishingly beautiful in its visual poetry! Pedro Costa, who wanted to capture the life in Lisbon's ghetto area called Fontainhas in the late 90s, made a beautiful film called Bones (Ossos). During the shoot, he saw much beauty in the place and got to know its poor, working class, immigrant inhabitants. He decided to immerse himself in their lives, abandoning his huge 35mm film equipment, elaborate lighting setups and a big crew and started documenting their lives with small video camera. The experience bore him two more extraordinary films, In Vanda's Room and Colossal Youth, starring the inhabitants of the slum, which are remarkably immersive fictional films bordering on documentary territory. The three films became later known as The Fontainhas Trilogy.  Fontainhas has since...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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Review: Pedro Costa's Visual and Narrative Maze of a Film, 'Horse Money' (In Theaters, July 24)

23 July 2015 10:11 AM, PDT | ShadowAndAct | See recent ShadowAndAct news »

In “Horse Money,” nothing and everything makes sense. It’s a kind of ghost story, a foggy memory, a series of vignettes where the past, present, and future all converge. The latest in director Pedro Costa’s series of films exploring the plight of disenfranchised Cape Verdeans in the Fontainhas of Portugal, the story revisits a version of the character Ventura, who played a major role in 2006’s “Colossal Youth”. Costa opens with black and white photos of turn-of-the-century New York City tenement dwellers by famous photographer Jacob Riis, which echo a later musical vignette of still camera shots, dignified and unpitying portraits of Cape Verdeans living in the long since demolished shacks »

- Zeba Blay

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Daily | Goings On | 80s, PTA, Brakhage

23 July 2015 7:25 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Time Out New York is spotlighting ten highlights from Bam's ongoing Indie 80s series, including David Lynch's Blue Velvet. More goings on: Pedro Costa in New York, Bill Gunn's Ganja & Hess and films by William E. Jones and Thom Andersen in Los Angeles, a Paul Thomas Anderson series in Portland, a program of free screenings in Knoxville and work by Stan Brakhage in Nashville. As Michael Sicinski writes for the Scene, "while Brakhage's films may bear comparisons to a different set of artforms—painting, photography, poetry—they are based on irreducible elements of cinema: light, time and motion." » - David Hudson »

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Weekly Rushes. 22 July 2015

22 July 2015 4:39 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Rushes collects news, articles, images, videos and more for a weekly roundup of essential items from the world of film.Above: The trailer for Alejandro González Iñárritu's The Revenant, his follow-up to Birdman.Mubi has signed its first theatrical deal, to distribute Miguel Gomes' beautiful three-part epic Arabian Nights in the UK.The big news of the week is the theft of F.W. Murnau's head. No kidding.At Film Comment, Portuguese master Pedro Costa, subject of a retrospective at New York's Film Society of Lincoln Center, has written on Howard Hawks' Land of the Pharaohs, which Costa has selected to show in his carte blanche program there.Above: Tony Zhao's Every Frame a Painting series of video essays continues with Chuck Jones - The Evolution of an Artist."The sheer amount of Woody Allen films means that each one—especially the less sensational among them—seems to lose its identity. »

- Notebook

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Joshua Reviews Pedro Costa’s Horse Money [Theatrical Review]

21 July 2015 8:00 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Some filmmakers make pictures that are hard to find descriptors for. However, some filmmakers simply make cinema that is as brilliant as it is defiantly unclassifiable. Pedro Costa is one of those very filmmakers. The Portuguese auteur has been churning out some of cinema’s greatest post-neo-realist pictures since the late 1980s, looking at the world that is lived in by those on the margins of society. Be it his Criterion-approved Fontainhas pictures or his latest film, Horse Money, Costa is not only one of today’s most important world filmmakers, but he is still as vital and defiant today as he was when he began his illustrious career.

Horse Money is the director’s newest picture (opening Friday in New York via Cinema Guild), and it brings us back to a world any Costa supporter will instantly recognize. Ostensibly a sequel of sorts to his masterpiece, Colossal Youth, Horse Money »

- Joshua Brunsting

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Daily | Costa, Oppenheimer, Polanski

19 July 2015 6:47 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

With a Pedro Costa retrospective running in New York through Thursday (to be followed by a week-long run for Horse Money), Ruben Demasure reports in the Notebook on the many conversations Costa had with Thom Anderson at the Courtisane Festival in April. And Film Comment's posted Costa's 1990 piece on Howard Hawks's Land of the Pharaohs. Also in today's roundup: Joshua Oppenheimer's The Look of Silence, Asif Kapadia's Amy, Jonathan Rosenbaum on Rudy Wurlitzer, an oral history of the making of John Boorman's Deliverance and Karina Longworth on Charles Manson, Sharon Tate and Roman Polanski. » - David Hudson »

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Daily | Pasolini, Maddin, Warhol

17 July 2015 7:46 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

In today's roundup: Guy Maddin on Douglas Sirk, McKenzie Wark on Pier Paolo Pasolini, James Douglas on the politics of Pixar, A.O. Scott on the culture of Comic-Con, Max Nelson on John Ford and Ireland, Stuart Klawans on Sean Baker's Tangerine, Chaitanya Tamhane’s Court, Christian Petzold's Phoenix, Liz Garbus’s What Happened, Miss Simone?, Asif Kapadia’s Amy and Stevan Riley’s Listen to Me Marlon, Jackie Cooper on Andy Warhol's Lupe (1966) with Edie Sedgwick, interviews with Hou Hsiao-hsien and Pedro Costa and a conversation between Kiriro Urayama and François Truffaut. » - David Hudson »

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Common Ground: Pedro Costa and Thom Andersen in Dialogue

17 July 2015 4:26 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Thom Andersen and Pedro Costa on stage at the Courtisane Festival. Photo by Michiel Devijver.This year’s Courtisane Festival paired Pedro Costa and Thom Andersen as their artists in focus. Both filmmakers hung out with each other and the public for the full five days of this under-recognized gem of a festival in Ghent. What at first might seem very different directors with distinct backgrounds actually proved to be kindred spirits. In the end credits of his new cine-history, The Thoughts That Once We Had, Andersen thanks Costa, because “without [him] this motion picture would have been poorer.” Andersen has admired Costa’s work ever since he discovered In Vanda’s Room (2000) at the Montreal Festival du Nouveau Cinéma in 2001. He wrote about this experience and about Colossal Youth (2006) in Film Comment in 2007. Andersen has invited Costa to CalArts, where he teaches, more than once, and Cinema Scope published a »

- Ruben Demasure

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Weekly Rushes. 15 July 2015

15 July 2015 6:45 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Rushes collects news, articles, images, videos and more for a weekly roundup of essential items from the world of film.Above: Jim Jarmusch photographed by Wim Wenders.The lineup for the 2015 Locarno Film Festival has been revealed, and includes new films by Hong Sang-soo, Andrzej Zulawski, Chantal Akerman, Athina Rachel Tsangari.A sad ending to an ambitious enterprise: The online, Us-based film publication The Dissolve has had to fold after only two years. Best of luck to their talented staff of editors and writings.Some good news from the online-film-criticism scene: the Norweigan film magazine Montages has launched its English-language international edition.!Portuguese great Manoel de Oliveira passed away last April at the age of 106. The documentary short Um Século de Energia, above, seems to be his final film.Critic Mike D'Angelo, a contributor to The Dissolve among many other publications, has written in defense of the "first-person review."If you were annoyed, »

- Notebook

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Daily | Chaplin, Welles, German

13 July 2015 12:42 PM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

In today's roundup of news and views: Jonathan Rosenbaum on Charles Chaplin, Pedro Costa and Nicholas Ray; Adrian Martin on David Cronenberg; Michael Atkinson on Aleksey German; La Furia Umana on George Miller, Michael Mann, Lewis Klahr and Ernie Gehr; World Picture on Pier Paolo Pasolini, Gregory Markopoulos, Zal Batmanglij, David Lean and Spike Jonze; Parallax View on Luis Buñuel; Jacques Rancière on Chris Marker; Julius Banzon on Tobe Hooper; a batch of articles on Orson Welles; Tony Williams on Mary Pickford; an interview with Monte Hellman; a conversation between Jonas Mekas and Hans Ulrich Obrist—and more. » - David Hudson »

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Haunting Look at Pedro Costa's Horse Money [Trailer]

10 July 2015 10:49 AM, PDT | QuietEarth.us | See recent QuietEarth news »

For the past 25 years, director Pedro Costa has been making important, transcending films and though he's been the toast of many a European festival for years, the past decade as seen his work really start to gain attention with North American audiences. Admittedly, that work isn't for everyone.

Costa's style is an acquired taste. His work is largely characterized by his use of non-actors, many of whom he discovered in Lisbon's now-demolished shantytown known as Fontinhas (or Fontainhas in English), non-linear storytelling and a visual style reminiscent of Bela Tarr – that is to say, purposefully, and sometimes painfully, slow. It may sound like a criticism but the truth is that I always feel like I've had a transcendent experience after seeing a Costa film. They occupy a place [Continued ...] »

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Watch: U.S. Trailer For Pedro Costa's 'Horse Money'

10 July 2015 8:53 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Even though it made Sight & Sound's 20 Best Films Of 2014, Pedro Costa's "Horse Money" didn't have quite the same cachet as films like "Boyhood," "The Grand Budapest Hotel," "Under The Skin," or "Birdman." But then again, his film stands alone. And after making the rounds on the festival circuit last year, the picture is finally landing in U.S. cinemas. Read More: Watch: Hypnotic Trailer For Pedro Costa's 'Horse Money' & 74-Minute In Depth Talk With The Director The mediative film follows a Cape Verdean immigrant, but it's not a movie that's narrative based in any traditional way, and instead takes viewers on a unique journey. Here's the official synopsis: A visionary masterwork from the renowned director of Colossal Youth, Pedro Costa's Horse Money is a mesmerizing odyssey into the real, imagined and nightmarish memories of the elderly Ventura, a Cape Verdean immigrant living in Lisbon. The time is now, »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Watch: The Nightmarish Visions in Pedro Costa's 'Horse Money' Trailer Will Haunt You

10 July 2015 8:26 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Pedro Costa's Acclaimed 'Horse Money' Gets Artful New Poster After being awarded the Best Director Prize at the 2014 Locarno Film Festival, Portuguese director Pedro Costa is preparing for the theatrical release of his film, "Horse Money," with the release of its trailer. "Horse Money" looks at elderly immigrant Ventura's real and imagined memories as they come together to form a frightening image of the struggles faced by Cape Verdean immigrants during the Carnation Revolution. Now living in Lisbon, Ventura recalls his experiences in the mid-'70s during the revolution while struggling with present-day challenges.  Before the film's premiere, Costa will be featured in a retrospective at the Film Society of Lincoln Center on July 17, entitled "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men: The Films of Pedro Costa." "Horse Money" premieres in New York on July 24. Check out the trailer for the film above. Read More: Cinema Guild. »

- Kaeli Van Cott

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In Portuguese Director Pedro Costa's 'Horse Money,' Nothing & Everything Makes Sense - Trailer, Poster Debut

10 July 2015 7:57 AM, PDT | ShadowAndAct | See recent ShadowAndAct news »

In “Horse Money,” nothing and everything makes sense. It’s a kind of ghost story, a foggy memory, a series of vignettes where the past, present, and future all converge. The latest in director Pedro Costa’s series of films exploring the plight of disenfranchised Cape Verdeans in the Fontainhas of Portugal, the story revisits a version of the character Ventura, who played a major role in 2006’s “Colossal Youth”. Costa opens with black and white photos of turn-of-the-century New York City tenement dwellers by famous photographer Jacob Riis, which echo a later musical vignette of still camera shots, dignified and unpitying portraits of Cape Verdeans living in the long since demolished shacks »

- Zeba Blay

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Pedro Costa's Acclaimed 'Horse Money' Gets Artful New Poster

8 July 2015 11:54 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Watch: Hypnotic Trailer For Pedro Costa’s 'Horse Money' & 74-Minute In-Depth Talk With The Director Pedro Costa, the acclaimed Portuguese director of "In Vanda's Room" and "Colossal Youth," is retuning to theaters later this month with his new drama, "Horse Money." The film won Costa the Best Director Prize at last year's Locarno Film Festival. To mark the upcoming release, distributor Cinema Guild has released a gorgeous new poster for the film. The official synopsis reads: "'Horse Money' is a mesmerizing odyssey into the real, imagined and nightmarish memories of the elderly Ventura, a Cape Verdean immigrant living in Lisbon. The time is now, a numbing and timeless present of hospital stays, bureaucratic questioning, and wandering through remembered spaces… and suddenly it is also then, the mid ’70s and the time of Portugal's Carnation Revolution, when Ventura got into a knife fight with his friend Joaquim. »

- Ethan Sapienza

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

1-20 of 39 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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