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Thanksgiving Viewing Guide 2017: What’s on TV (Photos)

  • The Wrap
Thanksgiving Viewing Guide 2017: What’s on TV (Photos)
FX will air a family movie marathon on Thursday, including “Smurfs 2,” “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2” and repeat airings of “Despicable Me 2” and “Minions” throughout the day (7 a.m. – 11 p.m.). Fxx will celebrate Thanksgiving holiday-themed “The Simpsons” marathon on Thursday evening (8 p.m. – 12 a.m.), followed by 12 back-to-back episodes of the CBS comedy “Mom” on Friday (12 – 6 p.m.). AMC will have a “Godfather” Thanksgiving, airing the Francis Ford Coppola film trilogy throughout the day and into the early morning (9 a.m. Thursday – 6 a.m. Friday). TBS will host some “Friends” for...
See full article at The Wrap »

Critics Pick the TV Shows That Get Mental Health Right — IndieWire Survey

Critics Pick the TV Shows That Get Mental Health Right — IndieWire Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What is the best TV show — former or current — that handles mental illness well?

Joyce Eng (@joyceeng61), TVGuide.com

Bojack Horseman,” especially Season 4, is almost peerless when it comes to a raw, honest portrayal of mental health. His depression and anxiety aren’t deployed as plot devices like we’ve seen plenty of times elsewhere; they’re just part of him and none of it is rubbed in your face. He’s allowed to be, break down, self-destruct, and the show never offers quick fixes or easy answers. “Stupid Piece of Sh*t” is a brutal depiction, even if you don’t suffer from depression or anxiety,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Critics Pick the TV Shows That Get Mental Health Right — IndieWire Survey

  • Indiewire
Critics Pick the TV Shows That Get Mental Health Right — IndieWire Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What is the best TV show — former or current — that handles mental illness well?

Joyce Eng (@joyceeng61), TVGuide.com

Bojack Horseman,” especially Season 4, is almost peerless when it comes to a raw, honest portrayal of mental health. His depression and anxiety aren’t deployed as plot devices like we’ve seen plenty of times elsewhere; they’re just part of him and none of it is rubbed in your face. He’s allowed to be, break down, self-destruct, and the show never offers quick fixes or easy answers. “Stupid Piece of Sh*t” is a brutal depiction, even if you don’t suffer from depression or anxiety,
See full article at Indiewire »

Director Shane Abbess on the Nostalgic and Collaborative Framework Behind ‘The Osiris Child’

It’s been almost one full year since Shane AbbessScience Fiction Volume One: The Osiris Child made its world premiere at Fantastic Fest late September 2016. We recently caught up with Shane to talk about his film. We discussed everything from production design to music to the economy of the film, notably the team’s efforts getting shots both done in budget in a timely manner. However, aside from a handful of scenes, you’d expect that he had the luxury of resources to build this fascinating world.

Culled from favorite childhood experiences/films, cherry-picked tropes from specific genres, and aimed at giving the audience things they’ve never seen before , the result of Abbess’ work is one of the most impressive sci-fi films this year. A long time coming for those of you who missed it on the festival circuit, but the ambitious sci-if gem that is The Osiris Child
See full article at The Film Stage »

Woodshock – Review

It’s travel time at the vacation wing of the ole’ multiplex yet again. A couple of months ago we explored France in Paris Can Wait, and just a few weeks ago we joined Steve and Rob for a food-filled travelogue in The Trip To Spain. Summer may be over, but it’s not too late to “get away from it all” with another trip….a trip inside your mind. If you’re thinking of “mother’s little helper” then you’re on the right track. Movies about drugs have changed with society over the years. The first flicks were hysterical (in more ways than one) cautionary tales epitomized by the camp classic Reefer Madness. With the counter culture’s rise in the 60’s and 70’s there were more enlightened films like, well Roger Corman’s The Trip. And in the 80’s Cheech and Chong finally took their weed humor
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

New to Streaming: ‘The Big Sick,’ ‘Paris Can Wait,’ ‘Harmonium,’ ‘Lost in Paris,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Big Sick (Michael Showalter)

From start to finish, The Big Sick, directed by Michael Showalter, works as a lovingly-rendered, cinematic answer to the dinner party question: “So how did you two meet?” Based on comedian Kumail Nanjiani‘s real life (he co-wrote the screenplay with his wife Emily V. Gordon), we meet Kumail (Nanjiani) as he finishes a stand-up set in Chicago. He becomes fast friends with a
See full article at The Film Stage »

Studios Released Just 7 Films Directed By Women This Summer, and They Might Break the Billion-Dollar Mark

  • Indiewire
Studios Released Just 7 Films Directed By Women This Summer, and They Might Break the Billion-Dollar Mark
Girl Talk is a weekly look at women in film — past, present, and future.

Thank Patty Jenkins — and then thank all the other wonder women who lit up this summer at the box office. This summer, studios released only seven films directed by women (that’s including speciality arms, and even a co-directed production), but the massive success of Jenkins’ “Wonder Woman” is poised to push the total take of female-directed studio films over $1 billion.

Nothing sings quite like “a billion dollars” in Hollywood, but what’s even more heartening is the variety of films in this small group.

Wonder Woman” is the story of the summer, an $800 million superhero that established Jenkins’ supremacy as director of the highest-grossing live-action movie directed by a woman and reestablished the solvency of the creatively stifled Dceu. It also made plain just how desperate audiences are for female-focused blockbusters. The film stayed in
See full article at Indiewire »

Bryce Dallas Howard Sets Directorial Debut With ‘Sorta Like A Rock Star’

  • The Playlist
The Coppolas have established something of a filmmaking dynasty at this point with Francis Ford Coppola, Sofia Coppola, Roman Coppola, and Eleanor Coppola all having stepped behind the camera. Now, it looks like the family of Ron Howard could be next.

Read More: Ron Howard Confirmed To Direct ‘Han Solo’ Movie

The director’s daughter and actress Bryce Dallas Howard is set to follow her dad’s footsteps behind the camera, and make her directorial debut with “Sorta Like A Rock Star.” Based on the book by Matthew Quick (“Silver Linings Playbook“), the project was once in development at Fox Searchlight, and as recently as last year had Miguel Arteta (“Beatriz At Dinner,” “Youth In Revolt“) attached to direct.

Continue reading Bryce Dallas Howard Sets Directorial Debut With ‘Sorta Like A Rock Star’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

From ‘Wonder Woman’ to ‘Girls Trip,’ a Great Summer for Women — But Don’t Call It a Breakthrough

  • Indiewire
From ‘Wonder Woman’ to ‘Girls Trip,’ a Great Summer for Women — But Don’t Call It a Breakthrough
As summer movie season winds down, women-driven films are front and center. “Wonder Woman” is the top title, “Atomic Blonde” starring Charlize Theron opens wide, Kathryn Bigelow’s “Detroit” begins limited runs before its nationwide release, and “Girls Trip” is on a $100 million trajectory. All of this underlines a good story for female-based films that began this spring with”Beauty and the Beast,” the year’s #1 film in worldwide release.

Does that mean a breakthrough for women, and films about them? Not exactly.

Read MoreTiffany Haddish: Why The ‘Girls Trip’ Star Is This Year’s Comedy Wonder Woman

First, the great news: Patty Jenkins’ “Wonder Woman” is the first time a female-directed action film has ruled the summer. (Vicky Jenson co-directed summer 2001’s top grosser, “Shrek.”) In a male-dominated comic book character universe, Gal Gadot and her D.C. Comics heroine rewrote the rules of what can be a blockbuster summer release.
See full article at Indiewire »

Amazon’s ‘Landline’ Leads Specialized Releases, Followed by Indian Rom-Com ‘Fidaa’

  • Indiewire
As “The Big Sick” crosses over to 2,500 theaters and “Dunkirk” takes up all the oxygen as the best-reviewed film of the year, this is a quiet moment for specialized releases. Here’s where they stand.

Read More‘Landline’ First Trailer: Gillian Robespierre and Jenny Slate Reunite For A Must-See Summer Indie

Opening

Landline (Magnolia) Metacritic: 65; Festivals include: Sundance, San Francisco, Seattle 2017

$52,336 in 4 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $13,084

Amazon brought Magnolia on board to handle theatrical on this Sundance acquisition, a complicated family drama about adult kids dealing with parental infidelity and sibling dynamics, with an eclectic cast including Edie Falco, John Turturro, and Jenny Slate. Opening in four top New York/Los Angeles theaters, this scored the best numbers for the weekend but otherwise not especially impressive. Saturday grosses fell slightly from Friday (in-person appearances were a likely factor).

What comes next: Magnolia adds 35 new dates this Friday
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Lady Macbeth’ Murders New Specialty Openers with Modest Box Office

  • Indiewire
Well-reviewed erotic period thriller “Lady Macbeth” (Roadside Attractions) led the new specialized limited lineup. But a below-$15,000 start at five major New York/Los Angeles theaters came in well below other stronger recent debuts.

With studio sequel “War for the Planet of the Apes” nabbing better-than-usual critical response (watch out for “Dunkirk” this week) and many popular films expanding, it’s getting tougher for even acclaimed new films to stand out.

Two top Sundance premieres — U.S. Narrative Competition title “To the Bone” and U.S. Documentary Audience Award winner “Chasing Coral” — both premiered on Netflix along with limited theatrical play. As usual for the company, the grosses went unreported.

Opening

Lady Macbeth (Roadside Attractions) – Metacritic: 78; Festivals include: Toronto 2016, Sundance 2017

$68,813 in 5 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $13,762

This low-budget 19th-century adultery drama’s roots are closer to “Madame Bovary” and “Lady Chatterly’s Lover” than Shakespeare. With its bodice-ripping appeal,
See full article at Indiewire »

Sense and sensibility by Anne-Katrin Titze

Blind director Michael Mailer with producer Jennifer Gelfer and Anne-Katrin Titze Photo: Kim of Orlin

In the past few months, Alec Baldwin has starred with Diane Lane in Eleanor Coppola's Paris Can Wait (which has its UK première at the Edinburgh International Film Festival), had an Unbound conversation with Anna Sale at the Bam Howard Gilman Opera House for the book launch of Nevertheless: A Memoir, continued to portray Donald Trump on Saturday Night Live, and is now appearing opposite Demi Moore and Dylan McDermott in Michael Mailer's Blind (with a screenplay by John Buffalo Mailer), which will shortly be seen on the big screen.

Producer Jennifer Gelfer who is currently directing her first film The Second Sun joined Michael Mailer and me at the end of last year for a Blind conversation at Cafe Orlin in New York's East Village.

Alec Baldwin as Bill Oakland: "Alec really trained hard.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

‘A Ghost Story’ and ‘The Big Sick’ Sustain Indie Box Office Surge

  • Indiewire
‘A Ghost Story’ and ‘The Big Sick’ Sustain Indie Box Office Surge
A Ghost Story” (A24) joined the recent surge of strong limited openers. Boasting top reviews, David Lowery’s offbeat Sundance hit nabbed a wider than usual arthouse audience. A24 is terrific with the right project at casting a wider specialized market net, so this should join several recent titles led by “The Big Sick” (Amazon Studios/Lionsgate) and “The Beguiled” (Focus Features) that have found wider interest as they expand.

This weekend, as breakout “The Big Sick” reaches a wider audience, it’s on its way to becoming the biggest specialized release of 2017 so far — and Amazon’s biggest grosser to date. It looks perfectly positioned for its nationwide break this Friday.

Syria documentary, likely Oscar-contender “City of Ghosts” (IFC) opened in New York only, landing high-end reviews for a reality-based theatrical release.

Opening

A Ghost Story (A24) – Metacritic: 87; Festivals include: Sundance, Seattle, Bam 2017

$108,067 in 4 theaters; PTA (per theater average
See full article at Indiewire »

Munich: Zvyagintsev, Pinho and Lass among winners

  • ScreenDaily
Munich: Zvyagintsev, Pinho and Lass among winners
Cannes competition title Loveless wins best international film.

Films by Andrey Zvyagintsev, Pedro Pinho and Tom Lass were among the winners at the 35th Filmfest München which came to a close on Saturday evening with a gala awards ceremony before the German premiere of Lone Scherfig’s Their Finest with actor Bill Nighy and producer Stephen Woolley in attendance.

The €50,000 Arri/Osram award for the best international film in the CineMasters sidebar went to Zvyagintsev’s Cannes competition film Loveless which opened in Russian cinemas through Wdssr on June 1 and will be released in Germany by Wild Bunch.

Producers Alexander Rodnyansky and Serguey Melkumov accepted the award in Munich from the hands of the international jury comprising German director Valeska Grisebach (whose latest feature Western premiered in Cannes’ Un Certain Regard in May), producer Markus Zimmer, and actress Nastassja Kinski.

This is the second time Zvyagintsev received the Munich award after his previous feature Leviathan had won
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Bawdy Nun Comedy ‘The Little Hours’ Soars at Specialty Box Office

  • Indiewire
Bawdy Nun Comedy ‘The Little Hours’ Soars at Specialty Box Office
All of a sudden the scary decline at the indie box office has reversed. Through the first five months of 2017, only four films opening limited in the standard four New York/Los Angeles theaters opened with a per theater average of $20,000. In the last four weeks, four films have opened strong as “Beatriz at Dinner” (Roadside Attractions), “The Big Sick” (Lionsgate) and “The Beguiled” (Focus) opened well and reached crossover crowds.

This week’s addition, Sundance comedy hit “The Little Hours” (Gunpowder & Sky) is the latest surprise. Loosely inspired by the bawdy 14th-century Boccaccio classic “The Decameron” (The Hollywood version starred Joan Fontaine while Pasolini shocked in 1971), this tale is set in the Medieval Italian countryside with bawdy contemporary dialogue as a randy peasant hides out at a convent after his master catches him with his wife. It did strong business at four theaters on two coasts.

This comes the
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Big Sick’ and ‘The Beguiled’ Rescue Indie Box Office, Top All 2017 Specialty Openers

  • Indiewire
‘The Big Sick’ and ‘The Beguiled’ Rescue Indie Box Office, Top All 2017 Specialty Openers
Things are looking up at the specialty box office as two festival hits, Sundance breakout “The Big Sick” (Amazon/Lionsgate) and Sofia Coppola’s Cannes director-winner “The Beguiled” (Focus Features) both beat all the 2017 limited openings to date. With $87,000 and $60,000 per theater averages respectively, they both accomplished something only one platform film (“Cafe Society”) achieved all last summer. And they did so the same weekend in some of the same theaters.

This shows that core specialty audiences are starving for cinematic nourishment they aren’t getting from mainstream studio fare.

The two new films join “Beatriz at Dinner” (Roadside Attractions), which expanded well in its third week. A box office rebound for specialized non-mass-audience film is finally under way.

Opening

The Big Sick (Lionsgate) – Metacritic: 87; Festivals include: Sundance, South by Southwest, Seattle 2017

$435,000 in 5 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $87,000

Amazon strikes again with its $12-million Sundance acquisition marking the biggest limited opening of the year,
See full article at Indiewire »

It’s a Coppola World: Inside the Filmmaking Co-Op That is Sofia, Eleanor, Roman, and Francis

It’s a Coppola World: Inside the Filmmaking Co-Op That is Sofia, Eleanor, Roman, and Francis
Sofia Coppola is the promotional circuit with “The Beguiled” (June 23, Focus Features). So is her 81-year-old mother, Eleanor, who wrote and directed her first narrative feature, the romantic road movie “Paris Can Wait;” Sony Pictures Classics is releasing it around the country to strong reviews and box office. Mother and daughter will meet, with their films, at this week’s Munich International Film Festival, where they’ll be joined by the man who began the family film dynasty, Francis Ford Coppola.

Sofia and her older brother, director and screenwriter Roman Coppola, also own San Francisco production company American Zoetrope, which their father launched in 1979; Roman runs it day to day. “They seek each other’s help when it’s needed,” said long-time family producer and casting guru Fred Roos.

Roos has been Francis Ford’s producer and casting director since “The Godfather.” And from the beginning of Sofia’s career,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

It’s a Coppola World: Inside the Filmmaking Co-Op That is Sofia, Eleanor, Roman, and Francis

  • Indiewire
It’s a Coppola World: Inside the Filmmaking Co-Op That is Sofia, Eleanor, Roman, and Francis
Sofia Coppola is the promotional circuit with “The Beguiled” (June 23, Focus Features). So is her 81-year-old mother, Eleanor, who wrote and directed her first narrative feature, the romantic road movie “Paris Can Wait;” Sony Pictures Classics is releasing it around the country to strong reviews and box office. Mother and daughter will meet, with their films, at this week’s Munich International Film Festival, where they’ll be joined by the man who began the family film dynasty, Francis Ford Coppola.

Sofia and her older brother, director and screenwriter Roman Coppola, also own San Francisco production company American Zoetrope, which their father launched in 1979; Roman runs it day to day. “They seek each other’s help when it’s needed,” said long-time family producer and casting guru Fred Roos.

Roos has been Francis Ford’s producer and casting director since “The Godfather.” And from the beginning of Sofia’s career,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Princess Cyd’ Review: Now This Is How You Write Strong Female Characters In a Movie

  • Indiewire
‘Princess Cyd’ Review: Now This Is How You Write Strong Female Characters In a Movie
It takes an incredible amount of restraint not to tie your film up with a neat little bow, but nothing could be more fitting for a filmmaker as committed to truth-telling as Stephen Cone is. In his latest film, “Princess Cyd,” the Chicago-based writer-director renders his deeply human characters so precisely, it’s as if they stepped right off the screen and into your living room. The two central women are equal parts charming, awkward, yearning and lost. In short, they’re real. Their complexity is all the more impressive coming from a male filmmaker — Cone proves it’s possible for men to write sexually liberated, empowered, autonomous women.

Though billed as a coming-of-age story, “Princess Cyd” is much more about relationships between women, across generations and through layers of grief. Specifically, it’s the story of sixteen-year-old Cyd (Jessie Pinnick) and her Aunt, a well-known novelist named Miranda Ruth (Rebecca Spence). Cyd’s mother died when she was young, and she’s been living with her father in South Carolina. When Miranda agrees to host the rambunctious teen for the summer, the two relatives find themselves thrust into familial intimacy despite not knowing much about each other.

Read More: ‘Paris Can Wait’ Review: Eleanor Coppola and Diane Lane Bring Mature Charm to a Road Trip Romantic Comedy

Cyd, for instance, is about the only person in Chicago (certain circles, anyhow) who doesn’t know her Aunt’s work. When Miranda offers her a book, she casually replies: “I don’t really read.” Cyd would rather sunbathe on Miranda’s manicured lawn than talk about “books ‘n stuff,” and Miranda bravely digs up her old swimsuit to join. She’s a cool Aunt, offering Cyd beer and encouraging her various summer flings, but she’s less prepared for Cyd’s prying about her own romantic life. “Do you ever have sex?” Cyd asks bluntly, and Miranda sheepishly admits it’s been a while.

Exchanges like that give the film its restrained friction, while avoiding the predictable traps. Miranda doesn’t balk, but she’s clearly taken aback. Cyd might be an obnoxious snoop, but she’s also genuinely curious. It’s a keen illustration of Miranda’s discomfort with her newfound maternal role. Earlier, she hesitates awkwardly before spreading sunscreen on Cyd’s back. It’s one of those masterfully subtle moments that calls up every other time Cyd has not had a mother to rub her back or brush her hair. Miranda has invested in her work over her family, and we see what that sacrifice entails through her interactions with Cyd.

Cyd’s casual sexual exploration is a breath of fresh air. She is as interested in the cute gardener neighbor as she is in the cute barista, Katie (Malic White). Katie sports a throwback mullet/mohawk combination, and when Cyd tells Miranda that she kind of looks like a boy, she replies, “Maybe she is a boy.” “Yeah, maybe so,” Cyd says, shrugging. It’s a casual handling of gender and sexuality that more movies should emulate. The same goes for the understated sex scenes; the most explicit shot is of Cyd masturbating. (Masturbation scenes should be required in any coming-of-age about female sexuality).

Miranda’s sexuality, or lack thereof, is also something of a revelation. With a premise that begs for lessons learned, and a film landscape that loves to make everything about sex, Miranda’s self-satisfied celibacy is nothing short of radical. “It is not a handicap to be one way and not the other,” Miranda tells Cyd in an inspired monologue. Standing over a kitchen full of dirty dishes, finally dishing it back to the saucy teenager she is trying desperately to love, Miranda is the very picture of modern motherhood.

Read More: 20 New Movies That Will Define This Year in Indie Cinema, From ‘The Big Sick’ to ‘A Ghost Story

Spence is entirely captivating as Miranda — resolute and warm at the same time. A seasoned Chicago actress, she commands the screen with a graceful strength like a cross between Diane Lane and Amy Brenneman. If show business made any sense, her star would be on the rise.

Cone packs a lot into 90 minutes, and as such there are a few loose ends. Cyd and Miranda rarely discuss the deep void between them, their shared loss. Cyd’s questions about heaven seem a little childish compared to her refreshing sexual maturity, and Miranda’s religious beliefs seem unnecessarily shoehorned into a story with plenty to explore. Miranda’s artist salon is a spirited group scene in the film’s second half, but reads like a play for literary references and a missed opportunity for Cone to poke fun at Miranda (and maybe himself). Cyd’s gossip session with two older lesbians is a highlight, however.

Loose ends are to be expected in a film more interested in life as it is than some over-stimulating fantasy. “Princess Cyd” is a triumphant little film — little in the detailed moments it creates, not the content of its character. Anchored by complicated, smart, funny women, “Princess Cyd” is a rare delight of a film and a model for others to follow.

Grade: A-

Princess Cyd” premiered at the Maryland Film Festival in May. It is being distributed by Wolfe Releasing.

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See full article at Indiewire »

Critics Slam ‘The Book of Henry’ as ‘Beatriz at Dinner’ and ‘Paris Can Wait’ Expand Well

  • Indiewire
Critics Slam ‘The Book of Henry’ as ‘Beatriz at Dinner’ and ‘Paris Can Wait’ Expand Well
At the specialty box office, reviews can have a huge impact. This weekend, “The Book of Henry” (Focus Features), Colin Trevorrow’s return to indie films, was scorched by critics and summoned only a mediocre start in 579 theaters ($1.4 million). On the other hand, the best per-theater-average came from “Hare Krishna” (Abramorama), a documentary the New York Times, normally critical in launching any specialized release, chose not to include among its reviews. It managed over $21,000 in one Manhattan theater.

While IFC’s Northern Ireland political story “The Journey” also delivered a surprisingly strong New York opening, the most encouraging news of the weekend was the impressive expansion for “Beatriz at Dinner” (Roadside Attractions).

Opening

The Book of Henry (Focus) – Metacritic: 28

$1,407,000 in 579 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $2,431

Trevorrow broke out with Sundance indie “Safety Not Guaranteed,” which grossed a healthy $4 million, followed by blockbuster “Jurassic World.” This anemic personal project will
See full article at Indiewire »
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