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Anderson Cooper Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (4) | Mini Bio (1) | Trade Mark (2) | Trivia (37) | Personal Quotes (19) | Salary (2)

Overview (4)

Date of Birth 3 June 1967New York City, New York, USA
Birth NameAnderson Hays Cooper
Nicknames Andy
Coop
Height 5' 10" (1.78 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Anderson Cooper was born on June 3, 1967 in New York City, New York, USA as Anderson Hays Cooper. He is a producer, known for Anderson Cooper 360° (2003), Anderson Live (2011) and 60 Minutes (1968).

Trade Mark (2)

Boyish, young-looking face and premature gray-white hair
Golden voice

Trivia (37)

ABC News correspondent from 1995 to 2000.
Cooper returned to broadcast news, now on CNN (2001).
He studied Vietnamese at the University of Hanoi in the 1990s.
Graduated from Yale in 1989 with a BA in political science.
Has a dog named Molly.
Graduated from Dalton School in Manhattan (1985).
During his senior year at Dalton, he left school and drove across South Africa in a truck. He contracted malaria while there and had to be hospitalized.
He waited tables at Mortimer's while growing up.
Writes a monthly column for Details magazine.
At the age of 3, Cooper was a guest on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson (1962) on 17 September 1970, when he appeared with his mother, Gloria Vanderbilt.
Also is a freelance writer whose articles have appeared in many other outlets, including Details magazine.
He has been a guest co-host of Live with Kelly and Michael (1988), filling in for Regis Philbin on several occasions since 2006.
A self-described "news junkie", having been one "since I was in the womb.".
Modeled with Ford Models for Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein and Macy's from age 10 to 13.
Started getting gray hair at the age of 20 and was completely gray by the age of 35.
One of the Top 10 men on Vanity Fair's international best-dressed list, which was published in the magazine's April 2004 issue. He appeared again on the international best-dressed list in the magazine's September 2006 issue.
Photographed as a baby by Diane Arbus for Harper's Bazaar.
Commencement speaker for the graduating class of 2005 at Kean University and the class of 2006 at Yale University.
Has a pet Welsh Springer Spaniel named Molly.
Named as one of the Sexiest Men Alive in 2005 by People magazine.
He was Number 3 on Playgirl magazine's Sexiest Newscasters List in 2004. In second place was Fox News Channel's Sean Hannity and in first place was MSNBC's Keith Olbermann.
In October 2005, it was announced that he signed a US $1 million contract to write a memoir for Harper Collins detailing his "life as a journalist and human being in Sri Lanka, Africa, Iraq and Louisiana/Mississippi" over the previous year. It was entitled Dispatches from the Edge and was released 23 May 2006. Some of Cooper's proceeds are being donated to charity. In addition, the book topped the New York Times bestseller list on 18 June 2006.
Interviewed news legend Walter Cronkite at the Gibson Amphitheatre in Universal City, California, in the second installment of a four-part University of Judaism Public Lecture Series (26 February 2007).
Is of Dutch, Chilean, Spanish and Irish ancestry from his mother.
Is a huge fan of the New York-based pop band Scissor Sisters.
Spent two summers as an intern at the CIA.
Suffered from dyslexia as a child.
His older brother Carter Vanderbilt Cooper (born on 27 January 1965) committed suicide on 22 July 1988.
Ranked #2 among "The Most Powerful Gay Men and Women in America" by Out Magazine in May 2007. After years of speculation, Cooper publicly admitted his homosexuality via a July 2012 email to Andrew Sullivan.
Has two half-brothers from his mother's marriage to Leopold Stokowski: Leopold Stanislaus "Stan" Stokowski (born August 22, 1950) and Christopher Stokowski (born January 31, 1952).
Has two half-nieces and one half-nephew by his elder half-brother Stan Stokowski: Aurora (born March 1983), Abra (born 1985) and Myles (born 1998).
Distant cousin of James Vanderbilt.
In his autobiography "Dispatches from the Edge: A Memoir of War, Disasters, and Survival" he recalls that as a small boy, his mother showed him the statue of his great-great-great-grandfather Cornelius Vanderbilt at Grand Central Station. For several years after, he believed that when one's older relatives died, they turned into statues. Cornelius Vanderbilt made part of his vast fortune in the railroad business, which is why his statue stands at Grand Central.
Great nephew of Thelma Morgan.
Signed a multi-year deal with CNN, which would allow him to continue as a contributor to 60 Minutes (1968) as well as doubling his salary from $2 million annually to a reported $4 million.
His book, "Dispatches from the Edge: A Memoir of War, Disasters and Survival", is released. [May 2006]

Personal Quotes (19)

We do things with a wink and a nod. If you don't include yourself in the critique, you have no business doing it.
Going gray is like ejaculating: you know it can happen prematurely, but when it does it comes as a total shock.
"I very much do not want to become what I used to make fun of. The newscaster on The Simpsons (1989) sadly is not that far off from what you see out there".
I've always loved reporting from the field most of all. There's something about doing live TV and being there as it happens that's always appealed to me. I think there's great value to bearing witness to these events as they're actually happening.
When the war in Iraq began I was anchoring the overnight coverage for CNN. Your teleprompter is blank and you have four hours to fill, and it can be a very long night if you don't know your stuff. I like that challenge.
I am sort of drawn toward places in the world where there is struggle and conflict.
Anyone who has experienced a certain amount of loss in their life has empathy for those who have experienced loss.
Obviously I was well aware that I had what people consider a privileged upbringing. My mom was never a bake-cookies sort of mom. I really had no reins whatsoever.
If I'm hip, we've got a problem in this country. I really shouldn't be held up as any model of hipness. If anything I think I'm sort of old school in my approach to objective reporting and not wearing my opinion on my sleeve. There's a lot of that in American TV news these days. Too much, in fact.
When I was younger, I talked to the adults around me that I respected most about how they got where they were, and none of them plotted a course they could have predicted, so it seemed a waste of time to plan too long-term. Since then I've always gone on my instincts.
Regarding his appearance on Celebrity Jeopardy: "It was called the Power Players edition, though I'm not sure why I was in it because I'm neither a "playa" nor a person of power. The experience really made me realize how much of a loser I am, because of how much I got into it. I mean, it's kind of a no-win proposition. In what I do you're supposed to know a certain amount of things, and there you are exposing yourself to ridicule for not knowing stuff. I didn't consider it that much in advance, but that morning I woke up and was like 'What have I got myself into?' But I feel OK about it now."
You know, I understand why people might be interested. But I just don't talk about my personal life. It's a decision I made a long time ago, before I ever even knew anyone would be interested in my personal life. The whole thing about being a reporter is that you're supposed to be an observer and to be able to adapt with any group you're in, and I don't want to do anything that threatens that. [In New York magazine, responding to rumors that he might be gay.]
When a big event happens people turn on to CNN, not only because they know there will be people there covering an event on the ground, but because they know we're going to cover it in a way that's non-partisan, that's not left or right.
I haven't reached the level of ego yet where I can talk about myself in the third person, but I'm so hoping I reach that stage.
[on celebrities] Seeing these people on TV, you think you want to be like them. But when you meet them, it's kind of disappointing. You realize, my God, they're just as desperate as everybody else. Especially the people in movies and TV. They're always looking around to see what more famous, better paid person is about to come into the room and steal their thunder. [They're]really creative and interested and fascinating, but they're also driven and kind of mad and unhappy.
I started going to wars by myself because I was interested in the issues of survival. I wanted to be around people who spoke the language of loss.
I think I was really shaped by loss, by the loss of my dad when I was ten, and the suicide of my brother when I was twenty-one and he was twenty-three. Both those things motivated me to be independent and self-reliant, to set out on my own and figure out my way in the world in a way that I thought would lead to a healthy, happier life.
As a child, I used to spend summers at the beach, and I loved to run along the edge of the sand cliffs made by the retreating tide. As I ran, I could feel the sand collapse beneath me, but as long as I kept moving forward, kept running fast, I could stay one step ahead of the falling cliff. That's what anchoring the news is like. You can easily falter, easily destroy your career in a sentence or two. The key is to keep going, keep moving, never forget you're running on sand.
It's become clear to me that by remaining silent on certain aspects of my personal life for so long, I have given some the mistaken impression that I am trying to hide something - something that makes me uncomfortable, ashamed, or even afraid. This is distressing because it is simply not true. The fact is, I'm gay, always have been, always will be, and I couldn't be any more happy, comfortable with myself, and proud.

Salary (2)

Anderson Cooper 360° (2003) $5,000,000/year (2007)
Anderson Cooper 360° (2003) $5,000,000/year (2009)

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