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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

11 items from 2017


How Today’s ‘Nonsensical’ Blockbuster Filmmaking Can Learn a Lesson From American Movies of the ’70s

7 June 2017 8:25 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Film critic Charles Taylor’s first collection of essays, “Opening Wednesday at a Theater or Drive-in Near You: The Shadow Cinema of the American ’70s,” explores the rich history of ’70s-era American filmmaking through a unique lens, opting to highlight some of the period’s underseen and often underappreciated gems. As one of the most fruitful times in American filmmaking, Taylor understands why certain features — including offerings from such respected filmmakers as Jonathan Demme, Walter Hill, and Irvin Kershner — didn’t quite make it big at a crowded box office, but he’s also eager to give them their due.

Told with an eye towards the current state of cinema — a blockbuster-driven machine that Taylor calls “nonsensical” and contributing to “the destruction of the idea of content” — the book is a loving look at some forgotten gems and the power of moviemaking that can often be ignored. In our excerpt from the book, »

- Indiewire Staff

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‘Redoubtable’: Michel Hazanavicius’ Free-Wheeling Jean-Luc Godard Biopic Goes to Cohen Media — Cannes

26 May 2017 6:51 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Cohen Media Group has acquired the North American rights to Michel Hazanavicius’ free-wheeling Jean-Luc Godard biopic “Redoubtable,” which premiered late last week at the Cannes Film Festival.

Set in Paris 1967, “Redoubtable” follows Godard as he’s forced to re-examine himself after the reception of “La Chinoise,” his political film about young revolutionaries. Seeming to foreshadow France’s civil unrest in May of 1968, the director is shaken by the crisis and irrevocably changed by his own deep-rooted conflicts and misunderstandings. It is set for a North American release in early 2018.

Louis Garrel stars as Godard, with Stacy Martin as Anne Wiazemsky and Bérénice Bejo in a supporting role.

Read More: Cannes 2017: 9 Hot Acquisition Titles That Will Have Buyers Chasing Foreign Films

CEO Charles Cohen has never met a French movie he doesn’t like, so the pairing of his outfit and Hazanavicius’ French film about a French filmmaker is a match made in acquisition heaven. »

- Kate Erbland

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Cohen Media Group acquires 'My Son'

16 May 2017 3:59 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Wild Bunch screens Christian Carion’s latest film in Cannes.

Cohen Media Group has acquired North American rights to the thriller My Son (Mon Garcon) starring Guillaume Canet and Melanie Laurent.

Christian Carion directs the recently completed film that Wild Bunch is screening in Cannes.

My Son centres on a husband and wife who are growing apart as the man receives a message from his distraught ex-wife during a stop-over in France.

When she says their son has gone missing, the man begins a search and will stop at nothing to get him back.

Carion directed French Oscar nominee Joyeux Noel and Farewell (L’affaire Farewell) and most recently Come What May, which Cohen Media Group distributed last autumn.

“Following our success with Come What May we are delighted to continue our close relationship with Christian Carion,” Cohen Media Group chairman and CEO Charles Cohen said.

“I’m really happy to work again with Cohen’s crew »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Larry Cohen, a Horror Hero For James Wan and Eli Roth, Reveals Why He Doesn’t Watch Scary Movies and Hates Remakes

4 May 2017 8:29 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

New York’s greatest B-movie legend is coming back to the Big Apple. Prolific writer-director-producer Larry Cohen returns to his native New York this weekend to appear at a retrospective of his New York-set films at the newly-renovated Quad Cinema.

Read More: ‘Kill Switch’ Teaser Trailer: Dan Stevens Stars in Apocalyptic Sci-Fi Thriller — Watch

The writer behind 2002’s “Phone Booth” and director of “A Return to Salem’s Lot,” Cohen directed 20 movies and wrote dozens of screenplays for both film and television during his roughly 50 year career. Many of his most well-known films were set in New York.

“It was my favorite place to shoot,” Cohen said. “New York is the world’s greatest backlot.”

The retrospective, entitled “Larry Cohen’s New York,” will include the “Whisper” cut of Cohen’s 1976 horror-thriller “God Told Me To,” a version that has never been screened in New York before. The other films »

- Graham Winfrey

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Andy Warhol’s Legendary Screen Tests, Including Bob Dylan and Edie Sedgwick, Find Temporary New Venue

3 May 2017 8:34 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes,” Andy Warhol famously said, but the legendary artist probably didn’t expect that such a sentiment would apply to his own screen tests, which have endured over the decades as a curious, intimate look at the inner workings of his creative process.

Filmed during the ’60s-era heyday of his Warhol Factory, the black and white screen tests feature a slew of Warhol regulars — from Ondine to Edie Sedgwick, Lou Reed to Bob Dylan — and other famous faces of the day, all lensed on Warhol’s own Bolex camera. Nearly 500 of the screen tests were filmed, though Warhol did not use or exhibit all of them. Favorites were arranged into various compilations that were then screened by Warhol for assorted audiences, though they’ve continued to inspire and delight fans for decades past their original filming.

Read More: Quad Cinema Reborn: »

- Kate Erbland

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5 Great Films New to Movies On Demand in May 2017, Including ‘Logan,’ ‘Get Out’ and ‘Raw’ — IndieWire on Demand

2 May 2017 11:27 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s Note: This post is presented in partnership with Movies on Demand. Catch up on the latest films On Demand here.]

Movies on Demand has another month of audience favorites in store, including some of the most popular titles of the year so far. Check out five of our favorite films from the upcoming month below, as well as the full list of great movies available throughout May.

1) “I Am Not Your Negro” (Available May 2)

Raoul Peck’s documentary about the life and work of James Baldwin is a stunning tribute to the writer’s vital work. Even thirty years after his death, Baldwin’s words still cut to the heart of issues confronting American society. With performances of Baldwin’s writing from narrator Samuel L. Jackson, Peck provides a deeply human gateway to understanding the achievements and contributions of a man who still has much to say about how our country understands race.

2) “The Salesman” (Available May 2)

Somewhat lost in the weeks of Oscars aftermath is the recognition of director Asghar Farhadi’s latest film, »

- Indiewire Staff

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Quad Cinema Reborn: How Charles Cohen Gave an Old New York Theater a Second Chance

12 April 2017 7:04 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

New York is undergoing a renaissance for independent movie theaters, with newcomers like Metrograph and the Alamo Drafthouse joining stalwarts like Film Forum, Bam and the Film Society of Lincoln Center in making New York one of the preeminent American cities for cinephiles. Now the scene is about to accommodate one more newcomer — although in some ways, this one’s been around for a while.  

Strictly speaking, the Quad Cinema won’t be the newest multi-screen theater on the block when it opens its doors April 14. In fact, it’ll be the oldest. The first multiplex in the city when it opened in 1972, the Quad catered to passionate audiences for decades before slowly declining in recent years due to disrepair and a decline in programming quality linked to an increased number of four-walled screenings.  

So Charles S. Cohen, the real-estate mogul and owner and founder of Cohen Media Group who »

- Andrew Lapin

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Why China’s Box Office May Not Save the Film Industry After All — CinemaCon 2017

27 March 2017 4:52 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Back in October, Dalian Wanda Group chairman Wang Jianlin had to admit that, after years of exponential growth, the China box office was slowing. The numbers proved him right: 2016’s worldwide box office of $38.6 billion rose just 1 percent, mostly because of a drop in China. While 71% of the global box office is international, it’s now North America that’s growing.

Ouch.

If those are our bragging rights, they come at a very high cost. After several years of massive, 30 percent-40 percent growth, China seemed like the answer to the nagging problem of North America’s thoroughly mature theatrical market. DVDs might be dead, theater chains aren’t growing, admissions are stagnant — but hey, China has more than 1.3 billion people! And suddenly, “Now You See Me” was a global franchise.

Now, the 2016 box office decline in China ($6.6 billion, down from $6.8 billion in 2015) may not bode well for the studios’ current »

- Anne Thompson

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‘The Salesman’: Will Academy Members Give it an Oscar To Protest Trump?

18 February 2017 2:47 PM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

As voters hover over their ballots, which are due February 21, the Best Foreign-Language Feature category presents a dilemma that’s unique to this year. Traditionally, many don’t vote in this category unless they’ve seen all the films. While the Academy sends links as well as screeners for all five nominees, it’s an honor system.

No one’s asking them to do anything differently now, but this year they may have a different reason to vote. Three out of the five documentary short Oscars focus on fallout from the Syrian conflict, as does documentary feature “Fire at Sea.”

Iranian director Asghar Farhadi, who won an Oscar in 2012 for “A Separation” and whose second Oscar-nominated film, “The Salesman” (Cohen Media), is playing on more than 65 screens and could pass the $1 million mark this weekend, grabbed a lot of press when he canceled his plans to attend the February 26th »

- Anne Thompson

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‘The Salesman’: Will Academy Members Give it an Oscar To Protest Trump?

18 February 2017 2:47 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As voters hover over their ballots, which are due February 21, the Best Foreign-Language Feature category presents a dilemma that’s unique to this year. Traditionally, many don’t vote in this category unless they’ve seen all the films. While the Academy sends links as well as screeners for all five nominees, it’s an honor system.

No one’s asking them to do anything differently now, but this year they may have a different reason to vote. Three out of the five documentary short Oscars focus on fallout from the Syrian conflict, as does documentary feature “Fire at Sea.”

Iranian director Asghar Farhadi, who won an Oscar in 2012 for “A Separation” and whose second Oscar-nominated film, “The Salesman” (Cohen Media), is playing on more than 65 screens and could pass the $1 million mark this weekend, grabbed a lot of press when he canceled his plans to attend the February 26th »

- Anne Thompson

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Cohen Media Group Launches New Classic Film Series With Chuck Workman Documentary ‘What Is Cinema?’

27 January 2017 4:00 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Turner Classic Movies and Robert Osborne are getting some healthy competition as Cohen Media Group launches ‘Cohen Film Classics,’ a new classic film series, hosted and curated by Cmg CEO and consummate cinephile Charles Cohen. The series premieres Friday night, with Academy Award winning filmmaker Chuck Workman’s 2013 documentary, “What is Cinema?”

Workman’s documentary combines archival interviews with film visionaries such as Chantal Akerman, Robert Bresson, Robert Altman, and Akira Kurosawa, along with newly conducted ones with Mike Leigh, David Lynch, and Jonas Mekas. In their own words, the filmmakers explore the meaning of the art to which they have devoted their lives.

Read More: ‘Downton Abbey’ Creator Julian Fellowes Reveals He’s Working on a Film Version

Following the premiere of “What Is Cinema?,” the series will show these four films every Friday in February: “Sudden Fear,” from 1952, featuring Joan Crawford and Jack Palance, “Hangmen Also Die,” Fritz Lang »

- Jude Dry

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

11 items from 2017


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