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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 24 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


The Young Girls of Rochefort

2 May 2017 10:53 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Perhaps motivated by the success of La La Land, Criterion has reissued two impressive Jacques Demy musicals as separate releases. This all-singing, all-dancing homage to candy-colored vintage Hollywood musicals is a captivating Franco-American hybrid that allows free rein to Demy’s marvelously positive romantic philosophy.

The Young Girls of Rochefort

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 717

1967 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 125 min. / Les Demoiselles de Rochefort / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date April 11, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Catherine Deneuve, Françoise Dorléac, Danielle Darrieux, George Chakiris, Gene Kelly, Michel Piccoli, Jacques Perrin

Cinematography: Ghislain Cloquet

Production Designer: Bernard Evein

Film Editor: Jean Hamon

Original Music: Michel Legrand

Produced by Mag Bodard, Gilbert de Goldschmidt

Written and Directed by Jacques Demy

 

I was going to squeak by reviewing only Jacques Demy’s The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, but the interest in the new La La Land prompted some emails and messages that tell me a revisit of the charming »

- Glenn Erickson

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The Jacques Rivette Collection on Blu-ray From Arrow Video May 23rd

30 April 2017 6:47 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Although François Truffaut has written that the New Wave began “thanks to Jacquette Rivette,” the films of this masterful French director are not well known. Rivette, like his “Cahiers du Cinéma” colleagues Truffaut, Jean-Luc GodardClaude Chabrol and Éric Rohmer, did graduate to filmmaking but, like Rohmer, was something of a late bloomer as a director.

In 1969, he directed the 4-hour L’amour fou (1969), the now legendary 13-hour Out 1 (1971) (made for French TV in 1970 but never broadcast; edited to a 4-hour feature and retitled Out 1: Spectre (1972)), and the 3-hour Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974), his most entertaining and widely seen picture. In these three films, Rivette began to construct what has come to be called his “House of Fiction”–an enigmatic filmmaking style involving improvisation, ellipsis and considerable narrative experimentation.

Celine and Julie Go Boating

In 1975, Jacques Rivette reunited with Out 1 producer Stéphane Tchal Gadjieff with the idea of a four-film cycle. »

- Tom Stockman

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Eyes Without a Face (Bfi Import)

11 April 2017 3:04 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Sometimes a movie is simply too good for just one special edition… Savant reached out to nab a British Region B import of Georges Franju’s horror masterpiece, to sample its enticing extras. And this also gives me the chance to ramble on with more thoughts about this 1959 show that inspired a score of copycats.

Eyes Without a Face (Bfi — U.K.)

Region B Blu-ray + Pal DVD

Bfi

1959 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 90 min. / The Horror Chamber of

Dr. Faustus, House of Dr. Rasanoff, Occhi senza volto / Street Date August 24, 2015 / presently £10.99

Starring: Pierre Brasseur, Edith Scob, Alida Valli, Francois Guérin,

Béatrice Altariba, Juliette Mayniel

Cinematography: Eugen Schüfftan

Production Designer: Auguste Capelier

Special Effects: Charles-Henri Assola

Film Editor: Gilbert Natot

Original Music: Maurice Jarre

Written by Pierre Boileau, Thomas Narcejac, Pierre Gascar, Claude Sautet from a novel by Jean Redon

Produced by Jules Borkon

Directed by Georges Franju

 

Savant has reviewed Eyes Without a Face twice, »

- Glenn Erickson

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Jean-Pierre Léaud Speaks: How a Cinematic Icon Nearly Killed Himself for His Best Role Since ‘The 400 Blows’

31 March 2017 11:24 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

I was standing outside the hotel room of a movie icon, unsure quite what I would find on the find on the other side of the door. It was the final day of the 2016 Cannes Film Festival, and after a week of frantic coordinating with various schedulers, I’d finally managed to land an interview with Jean-Pierre Léaud. He had just played the lead role in “The Death of Louis Xiv,” and still endured the impact of enacting his death for the cameras. 

Léaud became one of international cinema’s most famous faces at 14, when he starred in Francois Truffaut’s seminal French New Wave debut “The 400 Blows.” As the adolescent Antoine Doinel, who spends much of the movie acting out at school and at home while witnessing the dissolution of his parents’ marriage, Léaud quickly became the defining face of angst-riddled youth. The movie’s memorable closing freeze-frame »

- Eric Kohn

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When Meaningful Cinema Is Entertaining

30 March 2017 12:52 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

‘Wild Tales’ and ‘Get Out’ prove entertainment and depth are not mutually exclusive.

“I am altogether opposed to popular entertainment,” says Jean Cocteau, “because I consider that all good entertainment is popular.” The filmmaker and poet continues by describing how “film expresses something other than what it is, something that no one can predict. In any event, the measure of love with which it is charged will affect the masses more than any subtle and witty concoction.” Whilst there is an over saturation of images in 21st century culture (be that through small-screen phones or widescreen televisions) that leaves viewers familiar with repeated tropes and narrative devices, it’s easy to forget that cinema created to entertain the viewer can still have artistic depth. Rather than being about itself, or l’art pour l’art to use Théophile Gautier’s 19th century phrase, films intended to entertain can only exist with a mass audience. As »

- Sinéad McCausland

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All of the Films Joining Filmstruck’s Criterion Channel This April

29 March 2017 2:27 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This April will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Monday, April 3 The Chaos of Cool: A Tribute to Seijun Suzuki

In February, cinema lost an icon of excess, Seijun Suzuki, the Japanese master who took the art of the B movie to sublime new heights with his deliriously inventive approach to narrative and visual style. This series showcases seven of the New Wave renegade’s works from his career breakthrough in the sixties: Take Aim at the Police Van (1960), an off-kilter whodunit; Youth of the Beast (1963), an explosive yakuza thriller; Gate of Flesh (1964), a pulpy social critique; Story of a Prostitute (1965), a tragic romance; Tokyo Drifter »

- Ryan Gallagher

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Rushes. Cannes Poster, The Video Essay, James Gray vs. Harvey Weinstein, Scorsese Podcast

29 March 2017 6:31 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveriesNEWS© Bronx (Paris). Photo: Claudia Cardinale © Archivio Cameraphoto Epoche/Getty ImagesThe Cannes Film Festival has released the vibrant poster for their 70th edition. Beautiful, definitely, but how much longer are they going to rely on their glorious past rather than pointing to the present and future?We are excited to announce a collaboration with the Filmadrid festival in Spain to bring you films from their new section, The Video Essay, this June. Submissions are now open, so for video essayists new and experienced we encourage you to send in your work for consideration. Those selected will be screened both at the festival in Madrid and on the Notebook.Recommended VIEWINGWe adored Terence Davies' by turns witty and austere Emily Dickinson biopic A Quiet Passion when it premiered last year at the Berlinale. With its U.S. release coming soon, we finally have a local trailer. »

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The Beauty of Jean Cocteau’s ‘La Belle et la Bête’

23 March 2017 2:52 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Forget Disney’s recent reiteration of the classic fairy tale and instead look back at where the tale’s magic began on film, with Jean Cocteau.

The self-titled Belle and her captor-turned-prince Beast have returned to cinema screens around the world. In Disney’s latest live-action reiteration of one of their much-loved animated fairytales, Bill Condon’s live-action Beauty and the Beast has reintroduced contemporary audiences to the pair. With their return has come explorations of Disney’s representations of gayness, the question of modern viewing habits, and record-breaking box office success (the film has broken the March record for best opening with a $175m domestic gross).

This multiplicity of films on the same tale has been seen before, with the reintroduction of Snow White in 2012 arriving in the form of three very different films. 2012 brought the strong and defiant rebel ‘Snow’ in Snow White and the Huntsman, while Mirror Mirror restyled the classic tale. Pablo Berger »

- Sinéad McCausland

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The Magic of Jacques Demy

20 March 2017 12:52 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Taking a look at the French director’s fascinating filmography.

One of the biggest films of 2016, La La Land, owes a thing or two to French director Jacques Demy. The bright, colorful musical visually mirrors Demy’s The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964) and The Young Girls of Rochefort (1967), and director Damien Chazelle was able to capture something of the melancholic sweetness of Demy’s musicals. Demy is not one of the most famous French directors, however his films have a specific charm and intelligence that no other filmmaker could match. The way he blended Hollywood style with French culture was unlike any other filmmaker at the time.

Demy began his career in 1960s France, during the time of the “Nouvelle Vague” or French New Wave. This was the time of films such as Breathless, Jules and Jim, The 400 Blows, and Le Beau Serge. However, Demy lies a little bit outside of this group of filmmakers, and »

- Angela Morrison

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31 Things Only Diehard Beauty and the Beast Fans Know

19 March 2017 1:30 PM, PDT | POPSUGAR | See recent BuzzSugar news »

Image Source: Everett Collection Beauty and the Beast is one of Disney's most timeless classics, but there's a lot about the animated film that you might not have realized. For instance, do you know exactly what kind of animal the Beast was based on? Or his real name? The reboot is absolutely gorgeous and has a few interesting updates, but for now, let's revisit all of the interesting tidbits that make the 1991 film so great. Jackie Chan dubbed the voice of the Beast for Chinese-speaking countries. He provided vocals for both the Beast's speaking and singing parts! Chip originally had only one line. The producers liked 9-year-old actor Bradley Pierce's voice so much that they asked to expand the role. He also wasn't supposed to be a teacup. Early drawings of the character saw him as a music box who could only communicate by his chiming musical notes. Belle's »

- Quinn Keaney

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Beauty and the Beast review – gilt complex

19 March 2017 1:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Bill Condon’s live-action recasting of the Disney classic is ornate to the point of desperation

Poor Disney. With this live-action remake of the beloved animation Beauty and the Beast, the studio tried to do the right thing. A gay character (played by Josh Gad) is introduced and Belle (Emma Watson) gets an injection of feminist sass. Unfortunately, Gad’s character LeFou is hardly the celebration of diversity one would hope for – he’s a prancing rainbow flag of a sidekick, defined by the comic potential of his sexuality rather than just his sexuality. And Belle, with her skirt tucked into her bloomers and her sniffy disdain for the “provincial life”, might be a feminist but she’s also kind of a dick.

Bill Condon’s revamp of the material goes all out on spectacle. And, with its flourishes, curlicues and gilt – so much gilt! – the film is undeniably arresting. »

- Wendy Ide

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Newswire: George R.R. Martin opens nonprofit movie studio, since he has nothing else going on

17 March 2017 7:53 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Emmy winner George R.R. Martin, whose life we all know is all about moving pictures on the big and small screens, has just started a nonprofit production company in Santa Fe. Called the Stagecoach Foundation, it’s a 30,000-square foot space that houses a non-profit office and production company, and will be open to big-time Hollywood players and up-and-comers alike.

Martin, whose dream came true when he began writing for HBO’s Game Of Thrones, lives in Santa Fe, where he converted the Jean Cocteau Cinema into an arts studios/storage space combo (presumably for all the props he’s collected) that also finances local arts initiatives. Now he’s going to get to meet Joel and Ethan Coen, who will reportedly shoot some of their next film at Stagecoach Foundation. As if all that excitement weren’t enough, Santa Fe mayor Javier Gonzales tweeted about meeting the ...

»

- Danette Chavez

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George R. R. Martin on Writing TV's 'Beauty and the Beast': "It Was Such a Smart Show"

16 March 2017 12:21 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Before Beauty and the Beast became a Ziegfeld-esque follies of dancing silverware in a 1991 Disney animated feature — now a blockbuster live-action adaptation — it captivated adults as a 1987 CBS fantasy-romance series.

The show, which drew inspiration from Jean Cocteau's 1946 classic La Belle at la Bete, envisioned the tale unfolding in modern-day Manhattan, where our beauty is Catherine Chandler (The Terminator's Linda Hamilton), a lawyer savagely attacked in Central Park and left to die. She is rescued by the lion-faced Vincent (Ron Perlman) — a sensitive, literate soul with savage tendencies — who inhabits a rich »

- Seth Abramovitch

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George R. R. Martin on Writing TV's 'Beauty and the Beast': "It Was Such a Smart Show"

16 March 2017 12:21 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Before Beauty and the Beast became a Ziegfeld-esque folly of dancing silverware in a 1991 Disney animated feature — now a blockbuster live-action adaptation — it captivated adults as a 1987 CBS fantasy-romance series.

The show, which drew inspiration from Jean Cocteau's 1946 classic La Belle et la Bete, envisioned the tale unfolding in modern-day Manhattan, where our beauty is Catherine Chandler (The Terminator's Linda Hamilton), a lawyer savagely attacked in Central Park and left to die. She is rescued by the lion-faced Vincent (Ron Perlman) — a sensitive, literate soul with savage tendencies — who inhabits a rich »

- Seth Abramovitch

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‘Beauty and the Beast’: How Bill Condon Built Hollywood’s Most Expensive Musical

14 March 2017 10:40 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Bill Condon knew that turning the 1991 animated musical classic “Beauty and the Beast” into a live-action musical would be a huge risk.

In many ways, Condon’s a perfect match for “Beauty and the Beast.” He’s one of the few directors who know how to deliver intimate, swoony romance, believable singing musical sequences, and  digitally enhanced visceral action. He wrote Rob Marshall’s Oscar-winning “Chicago,” wrote and directed “Gods and Monsters” (starring Oscar-nominated Ian McKellen) as well as the Oscar-winning musical “Dreamgirls,” and shepherded the last two “Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn” sequels to $1.52 billion worldwide.

Given the chance to make the biggest-budget movie of his career, he embraced what could be the most expensive Hollywood musical of all time. “Beauty and the Beast” clearly has The Condon Touch: two men in love with the same feisty heroine, digital wolves, magical creatures, Ian McKellen, swirling cameras, gorgeous production values, a rich orchestral score, »

- Anne Thompson

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‘Beauty and the Beast’: How Bill Condon Built Hollywood’s Most Expensive Musical

14 March 2017 10:40 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Bill Condon knew that turning the 1991 animated musical classic “Beauty and the Beast” into a live-action musical would be a huge risk.

In many ways, Condon’s a perfect match for “Beauty and the Beast.” He’s one of the few directors who know how to deliver intimate, swoony romance, believable singing musical sequences, and  digitally enhanced visceral action. He wrote Rob Marshall’s Oscar-winning “Chicago,” wrote and directed “Gods and Monsters” (starring Oscar-nominated Ian McKellen) as well as the Oscar-winning musical “Dreamgirls,” and shepherded the last two “Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn” sequels to $1.52 billion worldwide.

Given the chance to make the biggest-budget movie of his career, he embraced what could be the most expensive Hollywood musical of all time. “Beauty and the Beast” clearly has The Condon Touch: two men in love with the same feisty heroine, digital wolves, magical creatures, Ian McKellen, swirling cameras, gorgeous production values, a rich orchestral score, »

- Anne Thompson

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Film Review: ‘Beauty and the Beast’

3 March 2017 9:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

You could say that the notion of turning beloved stories and characters into brands was invented by Walt Disney. He built his empire on the image of Mickey Mouse (who made his debut in 1928), but Disney really patented the brand concept in 1955, with the launch of Disneyland, where kids could see old familiar characters — Mickey! Snow White! — in a completely different context, which made them new. Twenty-three years ago, the Broadway version of “Beauty and the Beast” (followed three years later by the Broadway version of “The Lion King”) introduced a different form of re-branding: the stage-musical-based-on-an-animated-feature. Now the studio is introducing a cinematic cousin to that form with the deluxe new movie version of “Beauty and the Beast,” a $160 million live-action re-imagining of the 1991 Disney animated classic. It’s a lovingly crafted movie, and in many ways a good one, but before that it’s an enraptured piece of old-is-new nostalgia. »

- Owen Gleiberman

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‘Beauty and the Beast’ Review: Disney’s Animated Classic Gets A Needless Makeover

3 March 2017 9:00 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Disney wants us to know that Bill Condon’s “Beauty and the Beast” is a vital live-action remake of its own 1991 animated classic. Alan Menken and Tim Rice wrote three new songs for the film, and in interviews, Condon promised the first “exclusively gay moment in a Disney movie.”

They succeeded on one point: The film’s most Broadway-like thrills come from the Menken-Rice tune written as the Beast’s soliloquy. As for that gay moment, it’s tough to know which one he meant. There are a few winks and nods, the most apparent being a gag at the end where Wardrobe dresses three intruders in women’s clothes. In what could have been another tired cross-dressing gag (two men run away in disgust), a third stares directly into camera, beaming. Condon also might have been referring to another blink-and-you’ll-miss-it moment, when Monsieur LeFou (Josh Gad), right-hand man to Belle’s suitor Gaston, »

- Jude Dry

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Beauty and the Beast review: Dir. Bill Condon (2017)

3 March 2017 9:00 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Beauty and the Beast review:  Disney follow on from their success on The Jungle Book with this revisit to their 1991 animated classic.

Beauty and the Beast review, Paul Heath, March 2017.

Beauty and the Beast review

The Walt Disney Company continue on their journey to adapt every single one of their animated films to live-action form with an attempt to repeat the success of a 1991 classic. So far on that journey, which will continue with Aladdin and The Lion King in the future, the Mouse House has had quite the success, particularly with their last effort, The Jungle Book, which was surprisingly good. It’s a shame that Beauty and the Beast fails to duplicate that accomplishment.

This, ahem, tale as old as time revolves around the central character of Belle (Emma Watson), a twenty-something outcast of a small French village who is the object of affection for local ruffian Gaston »

- Paul Heath

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Review: ‘Beauty and the Beast’ is an Innocuously Serviceable Live-Action Remake

3 March 2017 9:00 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

The near-ubiquitous familiarity with the majority of Disney animations make the financial proposition of a live-action remake a no-brainer greenlight. In aiming to appeal to those experiencing these stories for the first time, the generation prior, and the generation that brought that generation to the theater, it can also be as creatively risk-averse as one might imagine. As these cultural touchstones get dusted off and literally brought to life, one wishes the experience amounted to more than waiting for that next sugar rush of nostalgia to arrive. The latest in the long assembly line of Disney live-action remakes, Beauty and the Beast, has its fair share of these moments, occasionally well-handled, but there’s an emotional detachment at its core that renders it an innocuously serviceable live-action remake.

Coming from director Bill Condon (Dreamgirls, Breaking Dawn), who is no stranger to the lavish musical, there’s little shortage of picturesque landscapes, »

- Jordan Raup

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 24 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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