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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003

9 items from 2016


NYC Weekend Watch: Jean Cocteau, James M. Cain, ‘Mad Max’ & More

26 May 2016 7:01 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Anthology Film Archive

Make it a Jean Cocteau weekend: The Blood of a Poet and Orpheus screen on Friday, the former also showing on Saturday and the latter on Sunday. Beauty and the Beast also shows on those days.

A Jia Zhangke retrospective comes to an end. If you’ve not yet seen Mountains May Depart, »

- Nick Newman

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Cannes Awards Wrap: How George Miller’s Jury Picked the Winners — And Losers

22 May 2016 2:16 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

As juror László Nemes (“Son of Saul”) said at the start of the Cannes Film Festival, juries are by their nature random. One thing you can count on is that the actors on the jury will shift the conversation. From the start, this year’s actors said they were looking for emotion. And that’s what the two top winners boast in abundance. “It was a collective decision,” said Miller of his “nine-headed beast,” describing the awards process as like creating a painting. “We looked at every variable, it’s not like ticking off a vote for the Oscars…we were looking at the awards like a totality. It took so much time, so much rigor, it was exhausting, emotionally, as everyone was talking so passionately.”

Thanks to jury chief Miller, it was Mel Gibson (whose “Blood Father” played well as a Cannes midnight movie) who presented the Palme d’Or to 79-year-old British director Ken Loach, winning for the second time (2006’s “The Wind that Shakes the Barley”); he’s won many other prizes over 18 films selected for Cannes. By far the most emotional movie of the festival, “I, Daniel Blake” (Sundance Selects) brought audiences to wrenching tears, including this writer. Based on research into England’s public welfare crisis, the film is a fictionalized story set in Newcastle about a joiner (Dave Johns) who can’t seem to convince the state to give him the disability he needs after a heart condition makes it impossible for him to work.

“The festival is very important for the future of cinema,” said Loach. “When there is despair, the people from the far right take advantage. We must say that another world is possible and necessary.”

Read More: The 2016 Indiewire Cannes Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During the Festival

Many critics did not respond to Loach’s overtly political film because they didn’t think he was doing anything different from what he had done before. But they really didn’t like Xavier Dolan’s very theatrical “It’s Only the End of the World,” which won the consolation prize, the Grand Prix, which means that the jury responded very differently to this heartfelt adaptation of a play about a dysfunctional family, who scream in French in extreme closeup. (Dolan won the jury prize in 2014 for “Mommy.”)

“Thank you for feeling the emotions of the film,” said Dolan (who attacked the critical reaction to his film) in a speech during which he cried, lips trembling, and chewed on his hands. Maybe it will now be picked up for the U.S., although it won’t be a crowdpleaser.

Co-winner of the director prize, Romanian Cristian Mungiu (“Graduation”), had also won the Palme d’Or, for 2007’s “4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days,” and his actresses shared the Actress prize for “Beyond the Hills.” Mungiu’s “Graduation” (Sundance Selects) sends a controlling father (Adrian Titieni) into a tailspin when his long-held post-graduation plans for his daughter (Maria Dragus) go terribly awry. Mungiu points out each individual’s role in doing the right thing when corruption and compromise often rule the day.

Co-winner Olivier Assayas, on the other hand, accepted his first Cannes award for “Personal Shopper” (IFC Films), his second English-language film starring Kristen Stewart (Cesar winner for “Clouds of Sils Maria”), whose character acquires fashionable clothes for a rich client. She tries to use her skills as a medium to communicate with her twin brother, who has recently died, when mysterious texts suddenly appear on her iPhone. It was a great Cannes for Stewart, who was well-received in Woody Allen’s “Cafe Society” (Amazon) as well, and for IFC/Sundance Selects, which is releasing “I, Daniel Blake,” “Graduation” and “Personal Shopper.”

Those who thought that the women who dominated the Cannes would come home with multiple awards were sorely disappointed. British director Andrea Arnold took home the jury prize for the third time for her daring American road movie “American Honey” (A24), a coming of age story starring Shia Labeouf and unknown Sasha Lane, making Arnold three for three at the fest after 2006’s “Red Road” and 2009’s “Fish Tank.”

Critics adored the film, which was shaped by the American midwestern landscape as well as the editing room. The film was vastly different from its original script and unlike anything else at Cannes this year. “Five hours ago I was sitting in my neighbor’s garden drinking tea,” Arnold said in her acceptance speech, thanking her cast and crew for the “team effort” on their “great adventure.”

Meanwhile, critics’ fave and the winner by a mile of the Screen International Critics Poll (see below), German director Maren Ade’s exquisite father-daughter comedy “Toni Erdmann” (Sony Pictures Classics), came home empty-handed. At the jury press conference jury chief Miller cited a “passionate” and long jury deliberation (which Mikkelsen described as “difficult”) on 21 films, directors, writers and many more actors as well as arcane jury rules that demand that the top three winners cannot win a second prize. Miller and Mads Mikkelsen both stated that they judged the films on their excellence, not on the sex of who directed them. “Each film was judged on its merits,” said Miller. “Filmmaking is filmmaking. It did not come up, we were looking at other issues.”

The first-time director prize went to “Divines,” a gangster thriller and female buddy movie directed by Houda Benyamina (Director’s Fortnight).

The jury defended the choice of Best Actress Jaclyn Jose for “Ma’ Rosa,” from Philippine director Brillante Mendoza, which some critics had suggested was a supporting role in a sprawling ensemble. “The critics were wrong,” said Donald Sutherland. “It’s a big-time leading role.”

“She’s the film,” said Arnaud Desplechin. “She broke my heart.”

The jury admitted that there were many strong actress contenders including “I, Daniel Blake”‘s Hayley Squires and Romanian actress Maria Dragus (“Graduation”), but they couldn’t award more than one prize for winners of the top three awards.

Asghar Farhadi’s “The Salesman” (Amazon/Cohen Media) was another surprise winner, taking home two prizes, for Best Actor and Best Screenplay. Shahab Hosseini plays an actor who is in the midst of moving apartments and starring in Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman” when his wife (Taraneh Alidoosti) is assaulted in the shower of their new domicile by a man who assumes that she is the former tenant, a prostitute. When the door buzzes, the wife thinks she is letting in her husband, but winds up in the hospital with more than wounds to her head and psyche — her husband is hellbent on revenge.

The Honorary Palme d’Or went to Jean-Pierre Leaud, who came to the festival with his first film “The 400 Blows” in 1959 when he was 14 years old, and was hugged by Jean Cocteau. Juror Arnaud Desplechin presented the award. Leaud said this was the most joy he had felt since Francois Truffaut told him to take the script for “The 400 Blows.”

Among those who did not need to attend the closing ceremony were Isabelle Huppert, who earned raves for Paul Verhoeven’s provocative thriller “Elle” (Sony Pictures Classics), in which she plays a videogame entrepreneur who refuses to allow her violent rape in her own home to ruin her life. Verhoeven’s first French-language film is likely to play better in North America.

Read More: Cannes 2016: Complete List of This Year’s Winners

Also left out of the awards were “Paterson” (Amazon), American auteur Jim Jarmusch’s spare and austere portrait of a bus driver poet (Adam Driver) and his wife and muse (Golshifteh Farahani), as well as Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardennes’ “The Unknown Girl” (Sundance Selects), starring Adèle Haenel as an empathetic doctor who ignores a late-hour doorbell at her private practice and finds out that the young woman was murdered nearby. She embarks on a mission to identify the girl and inform her family of her death. Park Chan-Wook’s gorgeously wrought erotic drama “The Handmaiden” (Amazon) starring Kim Min-hee and newcomer Kim Tae-ri as secret lesbian lovers was also overlooked.

Among the anticipated films that disappointed the critics at Cannes (not to mention the jury) were Sean Penn’s aid worker romance “The Last Face,” starring Javier Bardem and Charlize Theron, which was seeking a North American buyer, and Nicolas Winding Refn’s “Neon Demon” (Amazon), starring Elle Fanning, who discovers that starving models in the Los Angeles fashion world literally eat each other alive. In one memorable scene, when one x-ray model known as the bionic woman (because she has altered so much of her body) throws up an eyeball, her best friend pops it into her own mouth. (With five films at the festival, Amazon won no awards.)

At the “Neon Demon” party, when I asked Cannes director Thierry Fremaux why so many movies wound up in Competition that the critics did not like, he said that the festival was not set up for the critics, although they clearly play an important role. He said that how movies played for audiences was important too. Clearly that included the Cannes jury.

Stay on top of the all the latest headlines! Sign up for our Daily Headlines email newsletter here.  Related storiesCannes Film Festival Awards 2016Cannes Today: New Talent EmergesHow Will the Cannes Film Festival Impact the Rest of the Year in Film? (Podcast) »

- Anne Thompson

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Criterion’s July 2016 Line-Up as Joachim Trier Visits Closet, Sound of ‘No Country For Old Men,’ and More

18 April 2016 4:01 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Dailies is a round-up of essential film writing, news bits, videos, and other highlights from across the Internet. If you’d like to submit a piece for consideration, get in touch with us in the comments below or on Twitter at @TheFilmStage.

The Criterion Collection has unveiled its July 2016 line-up (click covers for more details):

Speaking of Criterion, Joachim Trier visits the closet:

The New Yorker‘s Richard Brody on when the Maysles filmed the Beatles:

The birthplace of the modern American documentary is Wisconsin, where Robert Drew brought a crew in early 1960 to film the campaigns of John F. Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey in that state’s Democratic Presidential primary. Albert Maysles was the cinematographer of its most iconic sequence, a long hand-held tracking shot following Kennedy from backstage to a lectern. There, Maysles caught Kennedy in the magic moment—the transformation from private to public, from casual manner to stage manner. »

- Jordan Raup

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Film Review: Shining Restoration of Jean Cocteau’s ‘Beauty and the Beast’

9 April 2016 7:54 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – One of the legendary films in cinema history is Jean Cocteau’s “La Belle et La Bete,” also known to generations as “Beauty and the Beast.” The restored re-release is touring the country, and in Chicago it’s currently at the Gene Siskel Film Center, and Patrick McDonald of HollywoodChicago.com will lead a discussion of the film there on Monday, April 11, 2016.

Rating: 4.5/5.0

The story is adapted from a traditional fairy tale, but in Cocteau’s hand is more adult-like, even more so than the sophisticated Disney animated version. The “Beauty” is about sexual blossoming, and the “Beast” is willing to accommodate, but first some trials must be had. What makes the film so unusual is the palette on which this multi-textured story takes place, an expressly creative landscape of dreams, with a production design (by Christian Bérard and Lucien Carré) that uses every inch of the ‘Academy Aspect »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Film News: 7 Films Announced For 2016 Chicago Critics Film Festival

9 March 2016 3:38 PM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – The Chicago Film Critics Association (Ccfa) has announced the first wave of films that will be presented at the 4th Annual Chicago Critics Film Festival (Ccff). The fest dates are May 20th to the 26th, 2016, will it will take place at the historic Music Box Theatre in Chicago.

The 2016 Chicago Critics Film Festival is scheduled for May 20 through May 26, 2016.

Photo credit: Cfca

The Ccff is the first film festival curated by film critics, and features a selection of films comprised of recent festival favorites and as-yet-undistributed works from a wide variety of filmmakers. Passes are now on sale (information below), and the following seven films are just a sampling of over 25 films that will screen during the festival.

Beauty and the Beast: Christophe Gans, the director of such films as “Brotherhood of the Wolf” and “Silent Hill,” unites two of France’s biggest stars, Vincent Cassel and Lea Seydoux, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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How New York's New Indie Movie Theater, The Metrograph, Plans to Be a Hit

1 March 2016 8:53 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: New York's Downtown Indie Movie Theater Unveils First Season of Programming New York City has been a focal point for arthouse theaters ever since they existed, but in recent years, the very concept of a well-programmed venue showcasing work from around the world has become a challenging proposition. As both independent venues and multiplexes battle the onslaught of home viewing opportunities, movie theaters must work harder than ever to validate their existence. Enter the Metrograph. The boutique two-screen theater — which also features a restaurant, a bookstore and a lounge — officially opens its doors at 7 Ludlow Street in downtown Manhattan on Wednesday with many reasons to pay a visit. The initial programming is a cinephile's dream, with retrospectives including a Jean Eustache series and "Welcome to Metrograph: A-f," which contains films ranging from Robert Bresson's "The Devil Probably" to Jean Cocteau's "Blood of a Poet" and Andy. »

- Eric Kohn

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Examining Hollywood Remakes: Beauty and the Beast

14 February 2016 5:55 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 Welcome to another look at Hollywood remakes, where we dissect a cinematic re-do and determine whether it’s a gem or a joke. We’ll be tackling Disney again for this entry in our series. This week, Cinelinx looks at Beauty and the Beast (1991).

 Disney had been trying to make a film version of Beauty and the Beast since the 1940s but for various reasons, it took 50 years for it to finally hit the screen. The well-known story was based on the fairy tale “Beauty and the Beast”, written by Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont. It was published in 1757 as part of the fairy tale anthology Le Magasin des Enfants. 

 Everyone loves Disney’s animated musical version of Beauty and the Beast. It was not only a huge hit, it was also the first animated film in America to be nominated for the Best Picture Oscar. It’s beloved by fans »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Gimme Shelter,’ ‘Beauty and the Beast,’ ‘The Insider’ & More

11 February 2016 8:57 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of the Moving Image

“See It Big! Documentary” has an amazing weekend, starting with The Last Waltz on Friday. Following that are a new restoration of Vertov‘s Man with a Movie Camera (with live musical accompaniment) and a Maysles double-feature of Salesman and Gimme Shelter on Saturday. Sunday offers Errol Morris‘ Fast, Cheap & Out of Control, »

- Nick Newman

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Metrograph, New York City’s Newest Indie Theater, Unveils Impressive First Slate of Programming

20 January 2016 8:54 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Each weekend we highlight the best repertory programming that New York City has to offer, and it’s about to get even better. Opening on February 19th at 7 Ludlow Street on the Lower East Side is Metrograph, the city’s newest indie movie theater. Sporting two screens, they’ve announced their first slate, which includes retrospectives for Fassbinder, Wiseman, Eustache, and more, special programs such as an ode to the moviegoing experience, and new independent features that we’ve admired on the festival circuit (including Afternoon, Office 3D, and Measure of a Man).

Artistic and Programming Director Jacob Perlin says in a press release, “Jean Eustache in a Rocky t-shirt. This is the image we had in mind while making this first calendar. Great cinema is there, wherever you can find it. The dismissed film now recognized as a classic, the forgotten box-office hit newly resurrected, the high and the low, »

- Jordan Raup

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003

9 items from 2016


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