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Hillary Rodham Clinton Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (4) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trade Mark (1) | Trivia (36) | Personal Quotes (15)

Overview (4)

Date of Birth 26 October 1947Chicago, Illinois, USA
Birth NameHillary Diane Rodham
Nickname Hill
Height 5' 6½" (1.69 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Oldest of 3 children born to Hugh and Dorothy Rodham. She grew up in Illinois, and attended Wellesley College. After graduating in 1969, she attended Yale Law School. She practiced law in Little Rock, while working on behalf of children as Arkansas First Lady. Since becoming First Lady in 1993, she has continued her work in children's issues and human rights. She is expected to run for the U. S. Senate from New York in 2000.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: anon-14

Spouse (1)

Bill Clinton (11 October 1975 - present) (1 child)

Trade Mark (1)

Headbands and pantsuits

Trivia (36)

Used to be a Republican and volunteered for Barry Goldwater when she was younger. She became a Democrat when she attended Wellesley and later on met Bill Clinton while they were attending Yale University.
Loves art, especially sculpture.
Gave birth to her daughter Chelsea Clinton on 27 February 1980.
Sister-in-law of Roger Clinton.
Honorary President of the Girl Scouts of America.
Raised in a United Methodist family.
Graduate of Wellesley College and Yale University Law School.
Kept her maiden name until 1982, when she changed it to help her husband get elected governor of Arkansas.
1984 Arkansas Mother of the Year.
Was the first First Lady in US history to seek and win a political office, while still being First Lady.
Is the first female U.S. Senator from the state of New York.
Portrayed by Ana Gasteyer and Amy Poehler on Saturday Night Live (1975).
Born at the stroke of midnight (12 AM CST).
Grew up in the suburb of Park Ridge, Illinois.
She ranked #22 in Celebrity Sleuth 25 Sexiest Women of 1997.
Wanted to be an astronaut until she learned that NASA did not accept women in the 1950s and 1960s.
Attended two high schools in Park Ridge, Illinois: Maine East High School, where a classmate was Steve Goodman, and Maine South High School, from which she graduated.
Daughter-in-law of Virginia Clinton Kelley.
Shares the same birthday (and was born in the same city) as Pat Sajak and is one year his junior.
Met her husband Bill Clinton, when she smiled at him in the Yale University library.
"Living History", her 2003 memoir of her life with President Bill Clinton, including his relationship with Monica Lewinsky, is the fastest selling non-fiction book ever.
Received the "Best Spoken Word Album" Grammy Award in 1997 for the recording of her book "It Takes A Village: And Other Lessons Children Teach Us".
Arkansas Woman of the Year in 1983.
Was reelected as United States Senator from New York with 67% of the vote (7 November 2006).
Born to Hugh Ellsworth Rodham (1911-1993), an executive in the textile industry, and Dorothy Emma Howell Rodham (born in 1919), a homemaker, she has two brothers, Hugh and Tony.
Announced her intentions to run for President of the United States on 20 January 2007 by forming a exploratory committee.
Is a fan of the TV show Most Extreme Elimination Challenge (2003).
Pardodied the closing scene of "Made in America", the series finale of The Sopranos (1999), for her presidential campaign, entering a diner followed by her husband and daughter (June 2007).
Between 1992 and 2008, the former First Lady appeared on 24 covers of Time magazine setting a record unmatched by any other woman.
Sir Elton John raised $2.5m for her 2008 presidential campaign with a concert at New York's Radio City Music Hall.
On June 7, 2008, she suspended her run for president and endorsed Senator Barack Obama.
When she was a young girl, was the president of Fabian's fan club.
Is sworn in as a US Senator from the state of New York (3 January 2001) and will serve until 3 January 2007. [January 2001]
Announced her candidacy for U.S. Senator from the state of New York. Is the first First Lady to seek political office. [February 2000]
Has announced she will be doing an exploratory for presidency [January 2007]

Personal Quotes (15)

[during her 60 Minutes (1968) interview in 1992 with her husband by Mike Wallace in response to how she feels about her husband's infidelity] I am not going to be some Tammy Wynette "Stand By Your Man..."
[speech, June 28, 2004] We're going to take things away from you on behalf of the common good."
[Interview on Today (1952), 1998] There is a story out there, for those who care to report it, and that is the vast, right-wing conspiracy that's been conspiring against my husband since the day he announced for President.
[July 3, 2007] I believe that presidential pardon authority is available to any president, and almost all presidents have exercised it. This [George W. Bush's quick commutation of the sentence of convicted perjurer Lewis Libby, aka "Scooter", former Chief of Staff of Vice President Dick Cheney] was clearly an effort to protect the White House . . . There isn't any doubt now, what we know is that Libby was carrying out the implicit or explicit wishes of the Vice President or maybe the President as well, in the further effort to stifle dissent.
I always take time to worship God in as evangelical a way as is feasible, given time and location constraints. As you know, I consider myself an evangelical Christian, really a Christian conservative, if you want to know the truth, so it's nice to be home again in the South, which I really consider my quote-unquote home even though I live in New York most of the time. Well, Washington D.C. most of the time, actually, but if I'm not there I'm in New York, of course, but always thinking about being here, in the South, my spiritual home.
Some people think elections are a game: who's up or who's down. It's about our country. It's about our kids' future. It's about all of us together. Some of us put ourselves out there and do this against some difficult odds. We do it, each one of us, against difficult odds. We do it because we care about our country. Some of us are right, and some of us are not. Some of us are ready, and some of us are not. Some of us know what we will do on day one, and some of us haven't thought that through.
[Washington D.C. speech, June 2008] Although we weren't able to shatter that highest, hardest glass ceiling this time, thanks to you, it's got about 18 million cracks in it. And the light is shining through like never before, filling us all with the hope and the sure knowledge that the path will be a little easier next time. That has always been the history of progress in America.
[Beijing Conference 1995] Tragically, women are most often the ones whose human rights are violated. Even in the late 20th century, the rape of women continues to be used as an instrument of armed conflict. Women and children make up a large majority of the world's refugees. When women are excluded from the political process, they become even more vulnerable to abuse.

I believe that, on the eve of a new millennium, it is time to break our silence. It is time for us to say here in Beijing, and the world to hear, that it is no longer acceptable to discuss women's rights as separate from human rights.

These abuses have continued because, for too long, the history of women has been a history of silence. Even today, there are those who are trying to silence our words.
[on personal power] Women are always being tested . . . but ultimately, each of us has to define who were are individually and then do the very best job we can to grow into that.
If Hollywood and Bollywood were how we all lived our lives, that would surprise me. And yet it's often the way our cultures are conveyed, isn't it?

People watching a Bollywood movie in some other part of Asia think everybody in India is beautiful and they have dramatic lives and happy endings. And if you were to watch American TV and our movies you'd think that we don't wear clothes and we spend all our time fighting with each other.
[on 10 August 2009, on being asked by an African student about President Bill Clinton's thoughts on Chinese economic policy] Wait. You want me to tell you what my husband thinks? My husband is not the Secretary of State -- I am. So you ask my opinion, I will tell you my opinion. I'm not going to be channeling my husband.
I the middle of the next crises, I'm cutting may hair. Believe me, we won't be reading about what war is going on.
[on Jason Segel's request that she appear in an upcoming project] I am a little occupied at the moment, but perhaps I can help you forget Sarah Marshall...again.
[on the murder of the U.S. Ambassador to Libya] He risked his life to stop a tyrant, then gave his life trying to help build a better Libya. The world needs more Chris Stevenses.
Anyone who says that racial discrimination is not a problem in American elections must not be paying attention.

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