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8 items from 2013


The rape of Anna Bates: what if Stieg Larsson had written Downton Abbey? | Holly Baxter

12 November 2013 3:27 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

It's a real shame that Downton treats Anna's rape as just another bothersome episode for her husband

In the realm of the small screen, another rapist is dead. Mr Green, who raped Anna Bates in Downton Abbey a few episodes ago, has been killed, somewhat mysteriously, in the series finale. The presumed murderer is the long-suffering Mr Bates, who has already undergone pretty much every injustice imaginable in pursuit of a quiet life. And now, of all things, his bloody wife went and got herself raped! Life, eh? Isn't it just a series of trials and tribulations?

The fact that Green became just another thing for Mr Bates to sort out is problematic for Downton. On the one hand, the programme was true to its time: it was, after all, unrealistic to imagine that Anna Bates might pop down to the police station, have her case handled sensitively, pursue her attacker in court, »

- Holly Baxter

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Ex-Time Warner CEO Richard Parsons Going The Jazz Restaurant Route In Harlem

3 September 2013 7:18 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Richard Parsons, the former chairman of Citigroup who was chairman/CEO of Time Warner until he stepped down in 2007, has resurfaced in Harlem. He and wife Laura are opening two new uptown restaurants in Minton’s and The Cecil. Minton’s is a restoration of the famed 1930s/1940s Harlem jazz club Minton’s Playhouse. It will reside in the original location, redesigned as a contemporary jazz supper club. Next-door sister restaurant The Cecil will be an Afro-Asian-American brasserie that integrates the culinary traditions of the African Diaspora with traditional Asian and American cuisines. The Parsons have appointed their long-time friend and Cafe Beulah restaurateur Alexander Smalls as Executive Chef of both eateries. The Cecil opens September 23rd and Minton’s opens the following month. The original Minton’s Playhouse opened in 1938 and became an outpost for good jazz from the likes of Thelonious Monk, Kenny Clarke, Charlie Christian, Charlie Parker »

- MIKE FLEMING JR

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Ex-Time Warner CEO Richard Parsons Going The Jazz Restaurant Route In Harlem

3 September 2013 7:18 AM, PDT | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

Richard Parsons, the former chairman of Citigroup who was chairman/CEO of Time Warner until he stepped down in 2007, has resurfaced in Harlem. He and wife Laura are opening two new uptown restaurants in Minton’s and The Cecil. Minton’s is a restoration of the famed 1930s/1940s Harlem jazz club Minton’s Playhouse. It will reside in the original location, redesigned as a contemporary jazz supper club. Next-door sister restaurant The Cecil will be an Afro-Asian-American brasserie that integrates the culinary traditions of the African Diaspora with traditional Asian and American cuisines. The Parsons have appointed their long-time friend and Cafe Beulah restaurateur Alexander Smalls as Executive Chef of both eateries. The Cecil opens September 23rd and Minton’s opens the following month. The original Minton’s Playhouse opened in 1938 and became an outpost for good jazz from the likes of Thelonious Monk, Kenny Clarke, Charlie Christian, Charlie Parker »

- MIKE FLEMING JR

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Strictly Ann: The Autobiography by Ann Widdecombe – review

10 June 2013 12:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Devoid of grace, humour or feeling, the former Conservative MP's autobiography serves as a corrective to her 'national treasure' status

When Ann Widdecombe appeared on Strictly Come Dancing in 2010, the judges were not complimentary, describing her variously as "a dancing hippo", "a Dalek in drag" and "the Ark Royal". Len Goodman, exasperated that she had somehow crept into the quarter finals, likened her to haemorrhoids: "You keep coming back more painful than ever," he said, in the dazed moments after she and her partner, Anton du Beke, had completed their Titanic-inspired interpretation of the rumba. Fortunately, a cure for Len's painful posterior was just around the corner. The following week, she finally made her exit, she and Anton having scored just 14 points out of 40. Widdy had been dragged across the Blackpool ballroom "like a Hoover or something" for the last time.

Is Widdecombe's writing any better than her dancing? No. »

- Rachel Cooke

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The Politician's Husband – TV review

26 April 2013 2:05 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Ambition, betrayal and battles in the bedroom – and that's just episode one of this follow-up to Paula Milne's The Politician's Wife

The Politician's Husband on iPlayer

I like to think of a few real politicians watching The Politician's Husband (BBC1). Yvette Cooper and Ed Balls, certainly; it might give her a few ideas. Ed Miliband, too, for the betrayal, though here the betrayal is not of a brother, but of a best friend, best man, godparent of children etc. And any number of politicians for dramatic resignations and/or leadership challengers – Geoffrey Howe, Michael Heseltine, John Redwood

In the belated follow-up to Paula Milne's 1995 drama The Politician's Wife, Westminster golden boy Aiden Hoynes (television's golden boy David Tennant, worryingly golden-haired here) resigns from the government, nominally in protest at the Pm's immigration policy, though really because he is challenging for the leadership himself. It backfires big time, mainly because his best mate, »

- Sam Wollaston

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Margaret Thatcher funeral: Dimbleby is stately on TV's near-state ocacasion

17 April 2013 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

ITV's Holly Willoughby and Phillip Schofield started too late and aimed too low to keep up with the BBC

David Dimbleby has some time to kill before the procession leaves the Palace of Westminster. Time to talk about the route, tell us about the undertakers and the horses – six black chargers led by Mr Twister – who'll pull the gun carriage after a pit stop at St Clement Danes.

And there are distinguished guests, mostly titled, in the studio overlooking St Paul's. Shirley Williams is generous, remembers the Iron Lady actually ironing, and praises her extraordinary single-mindedness and seriousness.

"What brings you here?" Dimbleby asks Terry Wogan. Sir T's not sure, he didn't know Lady T well, but he tells a story about her, Denis and a couple of gin and tonics I've heard before. Peter Hennessy, the historian, is on hand for pithiness. "She was a primary-colours politician who disturbed all the atoms in politics, »

- Sam Wollaston

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Rewind TV: Mad Men; Thatcher coverage; Off Their Rockers – review

13 April 2013 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The sun shone for the return of Mad Men, but the show's main man soon had sorrows to drown

Mad Men (Sky Atlantic)

Maggie and Me (C4) | 4oD

Off Their Rockers | ITV player

For years and for selfish, childish, reasons, I didn't really want to review Mad Men. It was about Madison Avenue in the 1960s, when there were slightly fewer colours in the world but those that there were were, somehow, more vibrant. The men got to wear properly cut suits, with shorter jackets and longer trousers, with pleats, creased just so. They wore slim, square watches that told you the time rather than sang to you to tell you it was raining, because they were grown-up men. They lived in impossibly sexy Bauhaus cartoon penthouses, with impossibly sexy Vargas cartoon wives. They said and thought clever things, often (and often even more cleverly) after having started in on »

- Euan Ferguson

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Europe is a ball and chain – we should unshackle ourselves | Terry Smith

1 March 2013 11:00 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

We have a negative balance of trade with the least competitive trading bloc in the world. Why would we want to stay part of it?

In deciding whether we want to be part of the EU we should ask ourselves whether or not it is advantageous to the UK to be part of that trading bloc. A trading bloc is advantageous if it enables us to access a larger free market for our goods and services. Economic theory from Adam Smith to David Ricardo shows that our prosperity is enhanced when we are able to focus on those goods and services that we are best at, and trade them with others who have different skills.

How is that going with our EU partners? Not very well judging by last year's Office for National Statistics figures. We have a negative balance of trade of £55.7bn with our EU partners: they sold »

- Terry Smith

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2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

8 items from 2013


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