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1-20 of 141 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Blake Lively Continues Her Commitment to the ‘Girl, Get Out of There’ Genre in Her New All I See Is You Trailer

13 hours ago | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

If your husband Jason Clarke can’t psychologically handle your corneal surgery, that’s a deal-breaker, ladies. »

- Halle Kiefer

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Blake Lively Goes Blind & Back Again in ‘All I See Is You’ Trailer

14 hours ago | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Love is blind. Because if you can see your spouse, you'll probably end up hating them... or something like that. That's how I'm choosing to interpret the new trailer for All I See Is You, the upcoming dramatic thriller from Monster's Ball and World War Z director Marc Forster. The film stars Blake Lively as Gina, a blind woman in an "ideal marriage" with her husband (Jason Clarke), who she depends on to be her eyes in the world. But when Gina has a corneal transplant and regains her sight, the trust between them starts to … »

- Haleigh Foutch

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‘All I See Is You’ Trailer: Blake Lively Struggles With Her Newly Reclaimed Sight in Upcoming Thriller — Watch

15 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Blake Lively stars in the upcoming thriller “All I See Is You” as Gina, a woman who regains her sight after a tragic car accident that took place in her youth. The wonder of sight quickly fades when Lively’s character realizes she’s been blind in more ways than one. The task of discovering her newfound self and the world around her begins as a fairytale, until the fantasy she’s lived inside stops holding up in the hard light of day.

Directed and co-written by Marc Foster (“World War Z”), “All I See Is You” also features actor Jason Clarke as Gina’s husband, who she can now see for the first time. Forster toyed with the use of our five senses while filming, experimenting ways to portray Gina’s life before surgery. Using only sight and sound, the audience is intimately invited into a unique viewing experience. »

- Raelyn Giansanti

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‘All I See Is You’ Trailer: Blake Lively Regains Sight In Open Road’s Upcoming Thriller

16 hours ago | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Blake Lively is gaining a new perspective in the trailer for Open Road Film’s All I See Is You, where she stars as a blind woman who regains her vision as well as her independence. Marc Forster directed the thriller, which co-stars Jason Clarke, Yvonne Strahovski, Danny Huston, Ahna O’Reilly and Wes Chatham. Open Road will release the film October 27. Co-written by Forster and Sean Conway, the pic follows Gina (Lively) who, blinded as a child in a nearly fatal car… »

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‘Chappaquiddick’ Review: Jason Clarke Plays Ted Kennedy in an Absorbing, Maddening Drama [Tiff]

16 September 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

“I could stand in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn’t lose any voters,” declared then-candidate Donald Trump in the middle of the 2016 Republican primaries. Perhaps he was well acquainted with the chapter in the life of Ted Kennedy, the legendary “lion of the Senate,” chronicled in John Curran’s Chappaquiddick […]

The post ‘Chappaquiddick’ Review: Jason Clarke Plays Ted Kennedy in an Absorbing, Maddening Drama [Tiff] appeared first on /Film. »

- Marshall Shaffer

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‘Mudbound’ Director Dee Rees On “The Interconnectedness Of Humanity” – Toronto Studio

15 September 2017 2:30 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Selling for a pricey £12.5m at Sundance this year, Dee Rees's Mudbound received a hearty welcome at the Toronto film festival in advance of its November 17 debut on Netflix. Adapted from Hilary Jordan's 2008 novel, with a cast including Carey Mulligan, Jason Clarke, Jason Mitchell, Rob Morgan, Garrett Hedlund and singer-songwriter Mary J. Blige, Rees' film tells the intertwining stories of a white family and an African-American family in rural Mississippi after the Second… »

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Tiff 2017: Here’s the Winners and Losers of the Festival

15 September 2017 9:43 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

At 255 titles, the Toronto International Film Festival’s smorgasbord is 20 percent smaller than last year — and still overwhelming. A number of filmmakers took creative risks that paid off with exuberant praise, from Darren Aronofsky’s outrageous “mother!” to Guillermo del Toro’s inimitable “The Shape of Water,” but many others found themselves in the doghouse, or worse, utterly ignored.

Buyers were unhappy that there wasn’t much to choose from at this sellers’ market, because many distributors cherry-picked the more promising titles ahead of time — which is its own risk, as when The Orchard’s La riot drama “Kings” didn’t meet high expectations.

Here’s how the festival shook out.

Best of the Fest

Top Tier Oscar Contenders

Guillermo del Toro’s gorgeously mounted fantasy thriller “The Shape of Water” (Fox Searchlight), shot in Toronto, was so popular that it’s vying for Tiff’s audience award (often an »

- Anne Thompson

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Tiff 2017: Here’s the Winners and Losers of the Festival

15 September 2017 9:43 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

At 255 titles, the Toronto International Film Festival’s smorgasbord is 20 percent smaller than last year — and still overwhelming. A number of filmmakers took creative risks that paid off with exuberant praise, from Darren Aronofsky’s outrageous “mother!” to Guillermo del Toro’s inimitable “The Shape of Water,” but many others found themselves in the doghouse, or worse, utterly ignored.

Buyers were unhappy that there wasn’t much to choose from at this sellers’ market, because many distributors cherry-picked the more promising titles ahead of time — which is its own risk, as when The Orchard’s La riot drama “Kings” didn’t meet high expectations.

Here’s how the festival shook out.

Best of the Fest

Top Tier Oscar Contenders

Guillermo del Toro’s gorgeously mounted fantasy thriller “The Shape of Water” (Fox Searchlight), shot in Toronto, was so popular that it’s vying for Tiff’s audience award (often an »

- Anne Thompson

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‘Chappaquiddick’: Jason Clarke’s Ted Kennedy Drives Into A Scandal [Tiff Review]

15 September 2017 8:04 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

It’s the summer of ’69, but Senator Ted Kennedy (Jason Clarke) didn’t buy his first real six-string or start a band with the guys from school, as the Bryan Adams song goes. Instead, he’s still mourning the tragic killing of his brother Bobby Kennedy a year earlier, while mulling his own possible presidential run. To the latter end, he’s gathered together six of the “boiler-room girls” who worked on behalf of Robert Kennedy’s presidential campaign for a party.

Continue reading ‘Chappaquiddick’: Jason Clarke’s Ted Kennedy Drives Into A Scandal [Tiff Review] at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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‘Mary Shelley’ Review: Elle Fanning Sparkles Inside a Lifeless Biopic — Tiff

14 September 2017 2:14 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

For a film that chronicles the rise of a creator obsessed with reanimating the dead, “Mary Shelley” is utterly lifeless. It contains a sparkling and startlingly raw performance by Elle Fanning, but Haifaa Al-Mansour’s disappointing followup to her remarkable “Wadjda” doesn’t push beyond paint-by-numbers biopic posturing, with revelations as insightful as the “Frankenstein” author’s Wikipedia page. The film documents the portion of Shelley’s life dominated by her romance with poet Percy Bysshe Shelley and meanders toward the subsequent creation of her signature novel. As the budding writer hammers away at her craft, the film’s own structure and style weaken into nothing more than a thin fever dream.

Heightened emotions rule “Mary Shelley”; even the earliest moments of Shelley’s life saw tremendous tragedy. We first meet young Mary (then Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin) as she dawdles by her long-dead mother’s gravesite, her lone place of respite and calm — entirely weird, »

- Kate Erbland

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‘Kodachrome’ Review: Another Road Trip Dramedy, But Jason Sudeikis Goes Deeper — Tiff

14 September 2017 10:21 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Ryder men are relics. Son Matt (Jason Sudeikis) is the kind of A&R dude who believes in the purity of music and his ability to just know when he hears something great, while his dad Ben (Ed Harris) is a lauded photographer who cherishes the look and feel of Kodachrome color reversal film and demands that his life remain “strictly analogue.” Despite their mutually affirmed dinosaur status, they are a long-estranged pair — and then a series of hinky contrivances shove them together in Mark Raso’s amiable “Kodachrome.” The conventional road trip dramedy mines that father-son dynamic for all its worth, but Sudeikis and Harris are very much up to the task, and their chemistry helps the film rise above its tropes.

The film draws from A.G. Sulzberger’s 2010 New York Times article about Kodachrome obsessives who made pilgrimages to small-town Kansas, where there’s one shop that »

- Kate Erbland

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‘Kings’ Review: Halle Berry and Daniel Craig Star in Another Misbegotten Movie About Race in America — Tiff

13 September 2017 5:02 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The last thing the world needs right now is another star-studded movie about the race riots that scarred 20th Century America. Okay, that’s not entirely true — past trauma can be an indispensable lens through which to see present tragedies, and we sure have plenty of both — but anyone who suffered through this summer’s “Detroit” would certainly be forgiven for thinking otherwise. The halos of celebrity and commercialism tend to obfuscate the potential value of exhuming such terrible events, and that blockage is only compounded by the insistent whiteness that always makes it possible. These films may be made with the best of intentions (and the most humanistic of ideals), but something is invariably lost in translation.

Consider the differences between Justin Chon’s “Gook,” which came out late this summer, and Deniz Gamze Ergüven’s “Kings,” which is slated for release this fall. Both films are about the L. »

- David Ehrlich

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‘Chappaquiddick’ Review: Jason Clarke Excels in Compelling Teddy Kennedy Biopic That Pulls No Punches — Tiff

13 September 2017 2:10 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Playing a public figure is always a big gamble, and a Kennedy — with those faces, those jaws, that peculiar accent that’s so easy to exaggerate — has long been a waystation for actors looking to prove their chops. In John Curran’s “Chappaquiddick,” Jason Clarke opts for a more low-key approach to Teddy Kennedy, eschewing a big accent or showy mannerisms, and fully disappears into the role. It’s his finest work yet, and proof of his ability to excel given the right material.

And what material he’s got, thanks to a tight script from Taylor Allen and Andrew Logan that dramatizes the events surrounding the fatal 1969 event that took place on the Martha Vineyard’s peninsula from which the film derives its title. Compellingly directed by Curran, “Chappaquiddick” takes place over the course of a single week, following a young Senator Kennedy before, during, and after the car »

- Kate Erbland

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‘American Assassin’ Review: Michael Keaton Shines in Predictable ‘John Wick’ Clone

13 September 2017 10:58 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In “American Assassin,” the violence is surprising and brutal. However, its impact is stymied by a predictable script and action sequences that feel like a watered-down version of “John Wick.” And while Dylan O’Brien is a compelling and charming lead, and Michael Keaton unleashes a welcome degree of cantankerousness, this is one mission that should have been aborted.

Still, “American Assassin” kicks off with a bang that sets the tone for several more. While on vacation on the beach in Spain, Mitch Rapp (Dylan O’Brien) proposes to his girlfriend, Katrina (Charlotte Vega), recording the tender event on his smart phone, unaware of the bloodshed that’s about to break out around them. Viewers, however, will be one step ahead of them — thanks in part to the cheesy setup, and to the film’s telling tagline: “Assassins aren’t born, they’re made.”

For Mitch, the undercover CIA counter-terrorism »

- Jamie Righetti

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‘A Worthy Companion’ Review: Evan Rachel Wood Is a Manipulative Lesbian With a Mommy Complex in This Taut Debut — Tiff

13 September 2017 7:50 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

For a long time, female characters had to earn the tedious badge of “likable.” In the last decade, however, actresses like Charlize Theron in “Monster” or Charlotte Gainsbourg in “Nymphomaniac” have paved the way for more complicated women to take center stage — flaws and all. Evan Rachel Wood’s frighteningly troubled character in “A Worthy Companion” is the next welcome addition to this messy bunch.

An unnerving portrait of a kinetically adrift sociopath, “A Worthy Companion” is the feature filmmaking debut from Montreal-based photographers Carlos and Jason Sanchez. Sporting shortly cropped hair and a serious choker, Wood’s disquieting Laura uses extreme manipulation tactics to get the attention and affection she craves. Tightly written and sensitively rendered, the devastating film is propelled by masterful performances, led by a bewitching Wood in the role she was born to play.

Read More:‘The Third Murder’ Review: Legal Thriller Is a Rare Misfire »

- Jude Dry

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Can American Assassin End It's Reign of Terror at the Box Office?

12 September 2017 10:56 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

New Line Cinema's It remake gave the sagging box office a much-needed jolt after the worst summer season in 11 years, pulling in a massive $123.4 million, which even came in $6 million higher than the original estimate of $117.1 million. The tally easily set a new record for the highest September opening weekend in history, along with the highest debut for any horror movie in history, and provided even more proof that audiences are hungry for edgy R-rated fare. This weekend, Pennywise and The Losers Club will go up against three new movies opening in wide release, Lionsgate's action-packed adaptation American Assassin, Paramount's bizarre drama mother! and Open Road Films' thriller All I See Is You. None of these movies are expected to give It a serious run for the box office crown, with the movie easily expected to repeat atop the box office with $66.2 million.

What's ironic about that projection is, »

- MovieWeb

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Livestream: Carey Mulligan, Garrett Hedlund, Mary J. Blige Premiere ‘Mudbound’ At Tiff

12 September 2017 7:26 AM, PDT | ET Canada | See recent ET Canada news »

After its acclaimed premiere at Sundance, the stars of the tense racial drama “Mudbound” are ready to take on Tiff. One of the Festival’s most buzzed-about movies, the ensemble period drama “Mudbound” stars Oscar-nominee Carey Mulligan, Garrett Hedlund, Jason Mitchell, Jason Clarke and Mary J. Blige and is directed by Dee Rees. Rees, a former […] »

- Rachel West

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Chappaquiddick review – tragedy and trauma reign in Ted Kennedy biopic

11 September 2017 11:40 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Jason Clarke impresses as the last Kennedy brother, whose reputation never recovered following the death of a young supporter in murky circumstances

By the end of his life, Senator Edward M Kennedy was “the lion of the Senate”, a sturdy marble column of American liberalism for close to 50 years. His final substantive act was giving the Obama daughters their pet dog. But in 1969, though he was a powerful man on paper and next in line for the presidency, family insiders knew he was a joke.

Joe Kennedy Jr, who died a war hero, was the favorite. John F Kennedy, the martyred president, had the charm. Robert Kennedy, who was supposed to be president, was the brilliant one. All this landed on the shoulders of Ted, the last living Kennedy son. He never had the respect of his father, but still lived in the glow reflected by admirers of his brothers, »

- Jordan Hoffman in Toronto

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Toronto Film Review: ‘Chappaquiddick’

10 September 2017 5:07 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Over the years, a great many actors have taken a turn at playing one of the Kennedy brothers (in made-for-tv movies, on “Saturday Night Live,” in big-screen historical dramas). The vast majority of these performances have been mediocre, a handful have been quite good, and a few have been memorable — like Bruce Greenwood’s cuttingly terse and commanding JFK in the Cuban Missile Crisis drama “Thirteen Days,” or Peter Sarsgaard’s tender and battle-scarred Robert F. Kennedy in “Jackie.” To that short list of singular and superb Kennedy performances, we can now add the Australian actor Jason Clarke’s portrayal of Edward M. Kennedy in “Chappaquiddick.”

Clarke, with a bit of makeup, looks the part to an astonishing degree: the squint, the hawkish profile, the wedge of hair combed gently over from the left side, the lips that hang slightly open as if pondering a question, giving Kennedy an aura that’s more tentative, less »

- Owen Gleiberman

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‘Chappaquiddick’ Toronto Review: A Morality Tale About Ted Kennedy

10 September 2017 3:53 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

For those who expect a hatchet job against the Kennedy clan in “Chappaquiddick,” which premiered on Sunday at the Toronto Film Festival, they’ll have to keep waiting. “Chappaquiddick” takes a hard look at the lowest point in Ted Kennedy’s life — when he walked away from the fatal car accident on Martha’s Vineyard in which a young Mary Jo Kopechne drowned after he drove his car off a bridge and into a tidal channel in 1969. Kennedy, at the time a newly-minted senator from Massachusetts, is played with taut egoism and convincing self-loathing by Jason Clark. He is flawed and behaves. »

- Sharon Waxman

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004

1-20 of 141 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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