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1-20 of 29 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Cinema’s Greatest Manhunt Movies

22 February 2017 4:53 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Manhunt movies have taken a shift over the years. Gone are the days of prohibition gangster heroism, liberating the common folk from the great depression with free flowing liquor. Times have changed and as Patriots Day shows us, heroes come in many forms and are often right under our noses.

Patriots Day exposes the stories of the everyday heroes involved in the manhunt for the Tsarnaev brothers following the devastating Boston Marathon attack in 2013. To celebrate the release of Peter Berg’s latest ‘based on true events’ film we’ve pulled together a list of the best manhunt movies currently at large.

Zero Dark Thirty

The exhausting hunt for Osama bin Laden was something the world was certainly aware of, but the cloak and dagger operation kept things under wraps until the evening of 1st May 2011 when in a seemingly sudden move, at least to the general population, bin Laden »

- The Hollywood News

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Jim Gaffigan to Star in Movie Comedy ‘You Can Choose Your Family’ (Exclusive)

6 February 2017 12:33 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Jim Gaffigan is starring in the movie comedy “You Can Choose Your Family” for Miranda Bailey’s Cold Iron Pictures and Imagine Entertainment.

Production will begin in May with Bailey making her feature directing debut. “You Can Choose Your Family” is a project developed in the Imagine/Reliance Big Entertainment Writers’ Lab written by Glen Lakin that was further developed by Bailey. Ron Howard, Brian Grazer, and Karen Kehela Sherwood of Imagine Entertainment and Amanda Marshall of Cold Iron Pictures will produce.

Gaffigan, who will star in Season 3 of FX’s “Fargo,” will play the seemingly normal father of a loving family. However, his home life is hilariously turned upside down when his 17-year-old son discovers that his dad has a second family.

Related

The Jim Gaffigan Show’ to End After Season 2

Bailey directed the upcoming documentary “The Pathological Optimist” and the 2010 documentary “Greenlight,” which premiered at SXSW. Cinematographer Yaron Scharf, »

- Dave McNary

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Sundance 2017 Breakouts: Here Are The Movies You Can Expect To See In Next Year’s Oscar Race

30 January 2017 11:54 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

On January 24, halfway through the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, Sundance received its annual reconfirmation of its long-legged success: The Oscar nominations. This year it’s Kenneth Lonergan’s “Manchester by the Sea,” and documentaries “Life, Animated” and “Oj: Made in America.” (Another five docs were shortlisted.)

Among its many other achievements, Sundance breaks out new talent. Agents, casting directors, producers, and filmmakers trawl screening rooms, looking for their next find. They network and party and pass buzz as they go, even when they must plow through blizzards to do it.

Here’s a look at what we might be celebrating this time next year. But remember, it’s a long long way from January to January.

Call Me By Your Name

The most obvious Oscar movie stood out from a sea of aspiring American indies, which is likely what Sony Pictures Classics had in mind when they scooped up the film »

- Anne Thompson

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Sundance 2017 Breakouts: Here Are The Movies You Can Expect To See In Next Year’s Oscar Race

30 January 2017 11:54 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

On January 24, halfway through the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, Sundance received its annual reconfirmation of its long-legged success: The Oscar nominations. This year it’s Kenneth Lonergan’s “Manchester by the Sea,” and documentaries “Life, Animated” and “Oj: Made in America.” (Another five docs were shortlisted.)

Among its many other achievements, Sundance breaks out new talent. Agents, casting directors, producers, and filmmakers trawl screening rooms, looking for their next find. They network and party and pass buzz as they go, even when they must plow through blizzards to do it.

Here’s a look at what we might be celebrating this time next year. But remember, it’s a long long way from January to January.

Call Me By Your Name

The most obvious Oscar movie stood out from a sea of aspiring American indies, which is likely what Sony Pictures Classics had in mind when they scooped up the film »

- Anne Thompson

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Sundance: The 10 Very Best Films from the 2017 Film Festival

30 January 2017 9:00 AM, PST | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

The Sundance Film Festival is officially over and the awards have already been handed out, both the official ones and our own Unconventional Awards, and out of the roughly thirty films I saw during my time in Park City, Utah, I’ve put together a list of the ten very best movies I had a chance to see. Many of them will be coming to theaters across the country later in the year, and a few of them may even be in the Oscar conversation a year from now.

10. The Big Sick

Silicon Valley’s Kumail Nanjiani made his triumphant debut as a leading man with this movie produced by Judd Apatow, directed by Michael Showalter (Hello, My Name is Doris) and co-written with wife Emily V. Gordon. Based on their own experiences in courting and how Emily (played by Zoe Kazan) being put into a medically-induced coma affected it, »

- Edward Douglas

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Netflix picks up Sundance hit 'Mudbound'

29 January 2017 8:44 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive Update: The streaming platform has acquired Us and multiple territory rights at the end of the festival in what was reportedly the biggest deal of Park City.

Screen understands the acquisition was for the Us and Canada, the UK, Italy, Benelux, Japan, China, South Korea, India and southeast Asia, Eastern Europe, South Africa, Iceland, Baltics and the Cis.

Early reports indicated the deal was for $12.5m however that number was not confirmed to Screen at time of writing.

If it is accurate, Mudbound becomes the biggest deal so far of Sundance 2017, overtaking the $12m Amazon Studios paid for the Us and select territories on The Big Sick.

The film made waves when it debuted last Saturday in Premieres and a deal percolated throughout the remainder of the festival.

Dee Rees directed the story of two Second World War veterans – one black, one white – who return to the Deep South where they face battles of a different »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Netflix Buys Sundance Drama ‘Mudbound’ for $12.5 Million

29 January 2017 6:36 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Netflix has closed on multi-territory rights to “Mudbound,” a drama about life in the segregated South starring Carey Mulligan, Jason Mitchell and Mary J. Blige.

The film premiered to an enthusiastic standing ovation at the Sundance Film Festival last weekend. But the movie’s substantial budget (north of $10 million) made a sale close slowly, after a bidding war failed to materialize. Even so, Netflix spend $12.5 million on the film, making it the largest deal to come out of Sundance 2017.

The streaming service will release “Mudbound” in theaters and online simultaneously in the United States. It plans to give the film an awards push, as the film’s Park City debut already sparked buzz for next year’s Oscars.

Mudbound” stars Mulligan and Jason Clarke as a couple who relocate to rural Mississippi. Their lives become intertwined with a family of black sharecroppers, headed by Blige and Rob MorganGarrett Hedlund »

- Brent Lang and Ramin Setoodeh

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Netflix Buys ‘Mudbound’ for $12.5 Million — Sundance 2017

29 January 2017 4:21 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Netflix has acquired the drama “Mudbound,” which premiered on January 21 in the Sundance Film Festival’s Premieres section. Netflix paid $12.5 million for the U.S. rights and other select rights to the film, Deadline reports. Good Universe previously sold the rights to multiple territories for the film.

Read More: ‘Mudbound’ Review: Dee Rees Enters the Big Leagues With Sweeping Period Epic — Sundance 2017

Directed by Dee Rees and set in the post-World War II rural Mississippi, “Mudbound” tells the story of two families pitted against the social hierarchy of 1940’s American south. When Ronsel (Jason Mitchell) and Jamie (Garrett Hedlund) return from war to life on a farm, their unique friendship challenges the already strained relationship between the two families. “Mudbound” is based on author Hillary Jordan’s 2009 novel of the same name, and features an ensemble cast that includes Jason Clarke, Carey Mulligan, Rob Morgan, and Mary J. Blige.

Rees »

- Graham Winfrey

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Netflix Paying $12.5M For Dee Rees-Directed ‘Mudbound’ – Sundance

29 January 2017 3:59 PM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Exclusive: While the Sundance Film Festival prizes were awarded yesterday, they’ve saved the biggest sale for last. Netflix has paid $12.5 million for Mudbound, the Dee Rees-directed drama that stars Carey Mulligan, Jason Clarke, Jason Mitchell, Mary J. Blige, Rob Morgan, Garrett Hedlund, and Jonathan Banks. The deal closing is for U.S. rights and select other territories, after Good Universe sold other territories around the world. That exceeds slightly the $12 million… »

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2017’s Sundance Sales Are In Overdrive: Here’s Why, Plus See Our Full Deal Scorecard

27 January 2017 8:38 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The Sundance Festival reveals the state of the indie film market, and 2017 will be remembered as the year of Amazon Studios and Netflix. And given the festival’s robust TV and Vr programs,, which were dominated by Google and Facebook/Oculus, there’s further digital disruption ahead.

According to one indie distributor, Sundance 2017’s valuations and sales are almost a third higher than last year. Put the same titles into the Sundance market two years ago, and they would have sold for far less. That’s because Netflix and Amazon Studios on the narrative side are dramatically driving up prices. “It’s just ridiculous what the digital guys are doing to the marketplace,” said one veteran indie CEO. “‘The Big Sick’ is a great little movie but it’s a $4 million -$6 million buy. There’s no logic to this model.”

However, Sundance has always been about the haves and the have-nots. »

- Anne Thompson

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2017’s Sundance Sales Are In Overdrive: Here’s Why, Plus See Our Full Deal Scorecard

27 January 2017 8:38 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Sundance Festival reveals the state of the indie film market, and 2017 will be remembered as the year of Amazon Studios and Netflix. And given the festival’s robust TV and Vr programs, which were dominated by Google and Facebook/Oculus, there’s further digital disruption ahead.

According to one indie distributor, Sundance 2017’s valuations and sales are almost a third higher than last year. Put the same titles into the Sundance market two years ago, and they would have sold for far less. That’s because Netflix and Amazon Studios on the narrative side are dramatically driving up prices. “It’s just ridiculous what the digital guys are doing to the marketplace,” said one veteran indie CEO. “‘The Big Sick’ is a great little movie but it’s a $4 million -$6 million buy. There’s no logic to this model.”

However, Sundance has always been about the haves and the have-nots. »

- Anne Thompson

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Sundance ’17: The Horizon Award Supports Emerging Women Filmmakers

26 January 2017 4:22 PM, PST | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

The Horizon Award Co-Founders — Christine Vachon, Lynette Howell Tayler, Cassian Elwes, and CEO of ShivHans Pictures — Shivani Rawat

(Photo by: Dan Campbell / Horizon Award)The Horizon Award heads back to Sundance Film Festival for its third year and cofounders Cassien Elwes, Lynette Howell Taylor and Christine Vachon bring new and returning sponsors.

The Wme Lounge in Park City, Utah during the 2017 Sundance Film Festival hosted the crowded celebratory event where everyone freely mixed and met each other.

Six directors judged the final 53 films to select the two winners. Catherine Hardwicke (“Thirteen”, “Twilight”), Kimberly Peirce (“Boys Don’t Cry”, “Carrie”), Jamie Babbit (“But I’m a Cheerleader”, “Addicted to Fresno”), Karyn Kusama (“Jennifer’s Body”, “Æon Flux”), Tina Mabry (“Mississippi Damned”, “Queen Sugar”), and Vicky Jenson (“Shrek”, “Shark Tale”) chose. Brittany “B Monét” Fennell and Andy Villanueva whose self-directed short films of two minutes or less were submitted through the website (www. »

- Sydney Levine

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Arnold Schwarzenegger, A Career In Crisis: Why the ’80s Action Icon Can’t Mount a Comeback

26 January 2017 8:30 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

This can’t be what Arnold Schwarzenegger imagined 2017 to look like: Sure, there’s a reality star in the White House, the Chicago Cubs are World Series champions, and his arch-rival (/best celebrity friend), Sylvester Stallone, is a recent Academy Award nominee. Yet for the ex-governor of California, far more confounding is how he became an ex-celebrity.

Schwarzenegger spent his acting life amassing a domestic box office of more than $1.8 billion. That haul came from comedies, like “Twins” ($111 million); science fiction, like “Total Recall” ($119 million) and “Terminator 2” ($204 million); or — his bread and butter — action flicks a la “True Lies” ($146 million) and “Eraser” ($101 million). But one unfortunate connection for all of Schwarzenegger’s films grossing $100 million-plus: They were all made before the year 2000.

Since the dawn of the new millennium, Schwarzenegger’s name above the title has carried less weight at the box office, resulting in drastically lower figures. How he »

- Ben Travers

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Arnold Schwarzenegger, A Career In Crisis: Why the ’80s Action Icon Can’t Mount a Comeback

26 January 2017 8:30 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

This can’t be what Arnold Schwarzenegger imagined 2017 to look like: Sure, there’s a reality star in the White House, the Chicago Cubs are World Series champions, and his arch-rival (/best celebrity friend), Sylvester Stallone, is a recent Academy Award nominee. Yet for the ex-governor of California, far more confounding is how he became an ex-celebrity.

Schwarzenegger spent his acting life amassing a domestic box office of more than $1.8 billion. That haul came from comedies, like “Twins” ($111 million); science fiction, like “Total Recall” ($119 million) and “Terminator 2” ($204 million); or — his bread and butter — action flicks a la “True Lies” ($146 million) and “Eraser” ($101 million). But one unfortunate connection for all of Schwarzenegger’s films grossing $100 million-plus: They were all made before the year 2000.

Since the dawn of the new millennium, Schwarzenegger’s name above the title has carried less weight at the box office, resulting in drastically lower figures. How he »

- Ben Travers

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Sundance Review: ‘Mudbound’ is an Old-Fashioned, Ultimately Poignant Drama

26 January 2017 6:27 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Expanding her narrative scope but still retaining a level of aesthetic intimacy, Dee ReesPariah follow-up Mudbound has the old-fashioned storytelling feel of a grand American novel. Based on Hillary Jordan’s 2008 book, the story takes place during World War II, and while it shows glimpses of the horrors of war, its larger aim is concerned with the racial divide of two families in the American south. Shifting point-of-views result in the drama taking a bit to find its footing, but after the groundwork is set, Rees is able to burrow deeper into the injustices — both piercingly subtle and horrifyingly grotesque — to create a powerful exploration of cyclical racism, with a touch of hope.

Transplanted from an upper class life in Memphis to muddy farm country, the McAllan family is made up of the head-strong Henry (Jason Clarke), Laura (Carey Mulligan), who still wants to hang onto a sliver of refined life through their piano, »

- Jordan Raup

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Scott Reviews Dee Rees’ Mudbound [Sundance 2017]

25 January 2017 6:09 PM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Mudbound is both intimate and epic; both small production and huge. A period piece centered around two families who live on a farmland in rural Mississippi – one tenant farmers, the other the farm owners – it also has to contend with members of each family going off to fight in World War II. At times, the production, organized through eight different companies, strains to meet its demands. But its limitations reflect those the characters face. While one might prefer to see an airplane dogfight from some vantage other than the pilot’s, well…so too would the pilot. The families are trapped on their farm, with little view of the world around them. This claustrophobia is their central conflict. For some, it’s an inability to escape. For others, it’s an inability to see beyond their bubble. And these factions brew a harsh world.

Because of this sort of scope, »

- Scott Nye

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Sundance 2017. Correspondences #3

25 January 2017 11:22 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

A Ghost StoryDear Lawrence,Almost every major festival has a hidden holy grail, the one film that will justify trudging through thick snow, the one film that will sustain us through less than ideal conditions, and the one film that will remain in our memory long after the festival is over. But because of how Sundance is programmed, marketed and covered, finding that film is impossible without trial and error, as you probably know all too well by now. Almost everything is positioned as the next something-or-other: the next all-timer, the next Best Picture winner, or the next Juno, Little Miss Sunshine or what have you. Have you been checking Twitter, reading the press releases, keeping up with all the “takes”? When I was here last year, there was the big hoopla over Birth of a Nation, which garnered universal acclaim and was the most expensive acquisition of the festival’s history. »

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Review: Mudbound (Sundance) starring Garett Hedlund & Carey Mulligan

24 January 2017 7:16 AM, PST | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

Plot: A woman (Carey Mulligan) is forced to relocate when her husband (Jason Clarke) buys a farm in rural Mississippi circa WW2. Once there, they get to know a family of tenant farmers working on their property, whose son (Jason Mitchell) has gone to war. Review: Sundance is a very tricky festival when it comes to predicting what will break out and what won’t. Coinciding with the Oscar... Read More »

- Chris Bumbray

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‘Mudbound’ Review: Dee Rees Enters the Big Leagues With Sweeping Period Epic — Sundance 2017

22 January 2017 12:59 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Six years have passed since director Dee Rees’ taut Brooklyn coming-of-age drama “Pariah,” and she’s been long overdue for tackling more ambitious material. As if making up for lost time, Rees returns with a sweeping period epic that operates on a far grander level.

With “Mudbound,” a dynamic post-wwii tale of racial tension and squandered opportunities in the deep south, Rees juggles a complex ensemble and heavy material with the confidence of a veteran storyteller. While not every aspect of this massive tapestry justifies its place in the 132-minute running time, Rees nevertheless delivers a complex look at social boundaries and the fragile efforts to correct the prejudices that define them.

Based on Hillary Jordan’s 2008 novel (which draws from her own troubled family history), “Mudbound” explores its setting with an epic sweep. It’s a somber portrait of two families, one black and the other white, both struggling »

- Eric Kohn

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Sundance Film Review: ‘Mudbound’

21 January 2017 10:48 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Some folks look out on the world, and all they see are the differences between people, the things that set us apart. “Mudbound” is a hymn to what we all share — the human struggle, the mutual desire to succeed and create a better world for our children — and it is a damning indictment of those who stand in the way of such progress. Set deep in the Mississippi Delta, it’s the epic story of two families, one white, the other black, who’ve each sown hope among fields too sodden to be much use — and though the sheer scope of the material overwhelms “Pariah” director Dee Rees at times, she finds shoots of optimism among the mire that couldn’t be more welcome at a moment when the country seems more divided than ever.

Adapted by Rees and co-writer Virgil Williams from Hillary Jordan’s remarkable debut novel, “Mudbound »

- Peter Debruge

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004

1-20 of 29 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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