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Robert Clampett Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trade Mark (2) | Trivia (9) | Personal Quotes (2)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 8 May 1913San Diego, California, USA
Date of Death 4 May 1984Detroit, Michigan, USA  (heart attack)
Birth NameRobert Emerson Clampett

Mini Bio (1)

Born in San Diego, California, the young Robert Clampett was monumentally moved as a child by the film The Lost World (1925), inspiring him to create a sea-serpent sock-puppet that he used in puppet shows to entertain the neighborhood kids. This led him to create a stuffed Mickey Mouse toy, which became a prototype for the first mass-produced Mickey Mouse doll.

Between 1931 and 1947 Clampett was an animator and later director for the legendary Leon Schlesinger Productions (later Warner Brothers Animation) where alongside his one time boss Tex Avery he became known as the wackiest and most archetypally cartoonish of all the directors.

During this time he also developed a test for a animated adaptation of 'John Carter of Mars' however, despite the support of the author Edgar Rice Burroughs it failed to materialize.

Amongst his famous fare was the Dalí inspired Porky in Wackyland (1938), his loving adaption of the Dr. Seuss book Horton Hatches the Egg (1942), the controversial all-black cast musical Snow White parody Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs (1943), the Fantasia (1940) parody A Corny Concerto (1943) and John Kricfalusis's favorite cartoon The Great Piggy Bank Robbery (1946) featuring the acerbic irreverence of Daffy Duck -- easily the most Clampett-esque of all his characters.

Clampett, at the time the longest serving employee at the animation studio, finally left in 1947. After a brief stint at Columbia, and a one-off cartoon at Republic It's a Grand Old Nag (1947) he was inspired by the new innovation of television to resurrect his old sea-serpent puppet, and created the phenomenally successful Time for Beany (1949)_ puppet television show, which was acclaimed by the likes of Albert Einstein and Groucho Marx, and even inspired the AC/DC line "Dirty Deeds, Done Dirt Cheap".

Clampett later returned to animation as a supervising producer on a cartoon series based on the characters of his puppet show Matty's Funnies with Beany and Cecil (1959).

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Constantine Ballis

Spouse (1)

Sody Clampett (25 June 1955 - 4 May 1984) (his death)

Trade Mark (2)

Wore black framed glasses and had thick black hair
[stretch animation] The characters in his animated films would stretch out double in body length whenever frighten, excited, or hurt.

Trivia (9)

Father of Bobby Clampett, Ruth Clampett and Cheri Clampett.
Animator John Kricfalusi notes Bob Clampett as one of his strongest influences.
An avid boater, he once rescued three men from a boating accident.
Based the original drawings of Tweety on his own baby pictures.
While most other Bugs Bunny cartoons portrayed Bugs as the generally clever and collected character who always wins, Clampett's cartoons sometimes portrayed Bugs as being on the losing end of things (e.g. Falling Hare (1943), Tortoise Wins by a Hare (1943)).
He started his career at Warners (Leon Schlesinger Studios) at the age of 17.
Was known to play pranks on the other directing units at Termite Terrace.
Supplied studio space to Arlene Klasky and Gabor Csupo early in their career.
Clampett used to spend his summers in the small (2.2 square miles!) Los Angeles County town of Hermosa Beach in the 1970's. He sometimes met science fiction writer Ray Bradbury there, and they and their wives spent time there during the mild summers Hermosa Beach and Redondo Beach were famous for since the 1920's.

Personal Quotes (2)

[When asked how he wanted to be remembered] I just want to be remembered. Period.
[Phil Monroe, an animator at Warner Bros., on working with Clampett] His strongest point would be that when you talked to him about the story, he'd get you enthused with his story points. He was always talking to you. He would get up and act out something; he was very descriptive.

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