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‘Columbus’ Trailer: John Cho and Haley Lu Richardson Bond Over Architecture in a Gorgeous, Quiet Drama

5 hours ago | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

John Cho has long deserved a romantic leading man role after paying his dues for years in the broad comedy of Harold and Kumar and as second fiddle in action franchises like Star Trek. He even gave an underrated performance in Selfie, a surprisingly charming TV show with a terrible title. But now it seems like […]

The post ‘Columbus’ Trailer: John Cho and Haley Lu Richardson Bond Over Architecture in a Gorgeous, Quiet Drama appeared first on /Film. »

- Hoai-Tran Bui

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Here Are The 555 Times Michael Bay Has Used Product Placement — Watch

8 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

You’re going to need to sit down for this one.

The supercut geniuses over at ScreenCrush have debuted their latest compilation, “Every Single Product Placement in the Films of Michael Bay,” and it’s 11 minutes of non-stop Bayhem that proves this madman never met an action scene, dialogue scene or establishing shot he couldn’t cram product placement into.

Read More: ‘Transformers: The Last Knight’ Review: Here’s the Most Ridiculous Hollywood Movie of the Year

The video arrives on the opening weekend of Bay’s latest CGI extravaganza, “Transformers: The Last Knight.” Critics have already hailed the film as the most ridiculous movie of the year, and because this latest outing is not included in the video below, it’s safe to say the product placement total has most likely skyrocketed above 600.

For now, you can watch all 555 instances of Michael Bay product placement in the video below. »

- Zack Sharf

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Karlovy Vary International Film Festival Celebrates Critics Choice Movies

9 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Variety Critics Choice celebrates its 20th anniversary as a key Karlovy Vary International Film Festival section.

Animals

Switzerland-Austria-Poland

If you can’t trust the talking cat, whom do you trust? Such are brain-frying quandaries viewers may face deep into the darkness of this deliciously unhinged, blood-laced adult fairy tale from Swiss-Polish writer-director Greg Zglinski. Setting out with real-world levels of macabre nastiness as it wittily probes the marital faultlines between a bourgeois Viennese couple attempting a restorative Alpine getaway, the film takes a smooth, almost imperceptible left turn into David Lynch-worthy realms of illogic that will leave adventurous audiences both rapt and dazed, dreamily uncertain of where exactly they lost the plot. Unraveling this cat’s-cradle isn’t half as important or pleasurable as getting entangled in it to begin with. Zglinski’s espresso-dark humor and icy formal precision may nod to a host of expert cinematic mind-gamers, from Roman Polanski to Lars von Trier, but “Animals” gleefully cultivates its very own kind of crazy.

Guy Lodge

Columbus

U.S.

There’s an old saying, often attributed to Martin Mull: “Writing about music is like dancing about architecture.” In many ways first-time writer-director Kogonada’s “Columbus” treats architecture like music, as its protagonists write, talk, bicker and dance about an extraordinary collection of modernist structures in the unassuming Midwest town of Columbus, Ind. The hypnotically paced drama carried by the serendipitous odd-couple pairing of John Cho and Haley Lu Richardson is lovely and tender, marking the mono-monikered Kogonada as an auteur to watch. The relationships between each of the characters are imbued with warmth and humanity, and the filmmaking — like the city’s structures designed by the likes of Eero Saarinen and I.M. Pei — are gorgeous. In this unconventional American film, Kogonada is less interested in romance than in the characters’ overlapping and divergent worldviews and dreams, based on culture, environment, and upbringing.

— Geoff Berkshire

The Distinguished Citizen

Argentina-Spain

Taciturn novelist Daniel Mantovani (Argentine star Oscar Martínez, who won the best actor prize at the Venice film festival for his performance) has an ambivalent relationship to fame: It has brought him the kind of wealth few authors can ever imagine, yet he’s concerned such success means he’s not the challenging writer he was at one time — an idea that’s amusingly conveyed in the opening scene, when he voices his fears while receiving the Nobel prize. Five years later, the Barcelona-based author remains too much in demand, politely declining most offers, until he gets a letter from his hometown of Salas, Argentina. It’s been four decades since he’s been back, despite using Salas as the setting for all his stories, and his return provides not only humor, but poignant insights into such themes as the burden of success, lost ideals, and whether artists truly give back to the communities they’ve creatively mined for decades.

— Jay Weissberg

God’s Own Country

U.K.

In case it didn’t court “Brokeback Mountain” comparisons directly enough with its tale of two young sheep farmers finding love in a hopeless place, “God’s Own Country” seals the deal with one winkingly quoted shot: a work shirt draped on a wire hanger, poignantly removed from its wearer. Twelve years on, Ang Lee’s film has proven enough of a cultural milestone to merit such affectionate homage; luckily, Francis Lee’s tender, muscular Yorkshire romance has enough of an individual voice to get away with it, depicting a tentative romance between coarse English farmboy Johnny (Josh O’Connor) and the Romanian migrant worker Gheorghe (Alec Secareanu) who comes to work for the season. Intimacy doesn’t come naturally to a man who has been raised in a household where caring is expressed through work, but rather than over-exerting well-worn clichés about rural homophobia, the film reveals pockets of tolerance in unexpected places.

Guy Lodge

Heal the Living

France

A 17-year-old car crash victim lies brain-dead in a hospital, as doctors urgently pitch the virtues of organ donation to his distraught parents; over in another town, a middle-aged mother of two with a severely degenerative heart condition goes on the waiting list for a transplant. What sounds like fodder for a routinely gripping episode of “ER” is complicated with rare depths of personal and sensual detail in French director Katell Quillévéré’s sublimely compassionate, heart-crushing third feature. More polished but no less authentically humane than her previous works “Suzanne” and “Love Like Poison,” this spidering ensemble piece — adapted from Maylis de Kerangal’s internationally acclaimed 2014 novel — boasts beautifully pitched performances from the likes of Tahar Rahim and Emmanuelle Seigner. But it’s Quillévéré’s soaring visual and sonic acumen that suffuses this sad, potentially familiar hospital drama with true grace.

Guy Lodge

Hounds of Love

Australia

An outwardly normal suburban Perth couple who abduct, torture, and murder schoolgirls must face their funny games in this genre-bending powerhouse thriller from first-time director Ben Young. Brave audiences will be rewarded, if that’s the word, with a harrowing ride that morphs from discrete horror to probing character study and back again in a vivid yet admirably restrained 108 minutes. Far from Michael Haneke-level lurid, the film generates a coiled depravity and almost unbearable tension from the determined tracking shots of cinematographer Michael McDermott and Dan Luscombe’s trance-like, Tangerine Dream-inspired score. Clayton Jauncey’s production design is detailed and evocative, keyed around kitchen knives. For such a bold film to work, the performances must be all-in, and the three leads are committed to Young’s vision: Ashleigh Cummings is fearless as the would-be victim, while Emma Booth is terrifyingly skittish and Stephen Curry (who is, believe it or not, a popular Australian comedian) redolent of pure evil.

— Eddie Cockrell

Lost in Paris

Belgium-France

As anyone who has seen “L’Iceberg” and “The Fairy” knows, Abel and Gordon are quite possibly the two funniest clowns working in cinema today. No, really: Dominique Abel is a Belgian-born, burlesque-trained human pretzel and gifted physical comic on par with Chaplin or Keaton, while real-life Australian wife Fiona Gordon is a Tilda Swinton-tall redhead with Olive Oyl elbows and an Easter Island profile. With their latest film, they take audiences to Paris, where she plays a shy librarian desperate to find her missing Aunt Martha (the final role of “Amour” star Emmanuelle Riva), while he plays a harmless hobo who pops up practically everywhere she goes. Let the comic situations begin as this duo travels from one corner of the city to another (nearly getting incinerated at Père Lachaise cemetery one moment, dangling from the rafters of the Eiffel Tower the next), creating some of the funniest moments you’ll see on screen all year.

— Peter Debruge

Merry Christmas Mr. Mo

South Korea

A droll comic drama filmed in glorious widescreen black-and-white, “Merry Christmas Mr. Mo” follows a terminally ill barber (played by distinguished character actor Ki Joo-bong) whose dying wish is to make a short film directed by his distant son. What might have been a mawkish exercise in implausibility is instead fashioned into a consistently amusing and frequently touching tale of love, family and reconciliation with the past. Played to deadpan perfection by an appealing cast and directed with impressive assurance by first-time feature helmer Lim Dae-hyung, this lovely tale channels the spirit of early Jim Jarmusch films such as “Stranger Than Paradise” into its ultra low-key humor, dialogue non-sequiturs and loving monochrome photography of notionally unremarkable locations. Without ever succumbing to sentimentality, this offbeat crowd-pleaser will also move many viewers to tears by the time Mr. Mo’s task is completed.

Richard Kuipers

Strawberry Days

Sweden

Every summer, the Polish workers come to the Swedish countryside and pick strawberries. They tend the fields all day and keep to themselves at night, while the landowners hardly bother to learn their names. It’s a cycle as sure as the seasons themselves, though this year is different as one of the foreign fruit-pickers’ kids is old enough to take an interest in the host family’s daughter, and there among the strawberries a case of young love blossoms for the first time, complicating the entire arrangement, for the migrant workers are expected to make themselves invisible. In this sensitive, sun-kissed teenage romance, Swedish director Wiktor Ericsson invites us to recognize and identify with these faceless outsiders, asking for equality on the simplest terms. Though the setting may be specific, its appeal is universal, boasting a texture so rich, you can practically smell the ripe strawberries in the air.

— Peter Debruge

Those Who Make Revolution Halfway Only Dig Their Own Graves

Canada

With its multiple aspect ratios, on-screen quotes, and cutaways to news broadcasts and documentary footage — not to mention a musical overture and interlude — this three-hour Quebecois political epic unfurls with a bravado as outsized as its title. Inspired by the student demonstrations that sparked the Maple Spring in 2012, co-directors Mathieu Denis and Simon Lavoie apply the language of radical cinema to a tense, mournful and profoundly ambivalent portrait of radicalism. Following four far-left activists as they commit acts of vandalism and terror to foment an uprising against the capitalist system, the film channels their passion while insistently questioning their methods and perspective. Politics aside, the dynamics at the film’s heart are practically universal among youth movements, resulting in a bold portrait that pulses with the vitality of four young people who, however flawed or foolhardy, sincerely want to change the world.

Scott Tobias

Related storiesKarlovy Vary Film Festival Honors Talent Working in Front of and Behind the CameraFuture Frames Showcase at Karlovy Vary Casts the Spotlight on Promising Creative TalentKarlovy Vary International Film Festival Showcases Stories of Social Turmoil »

- Variety Staff

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‘Columbus’ Trailer: Discover Why This John Cho Drama Is One of the Great Indie Debuts of 2017

10 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Kogonada is one of the most well known video essayists on the internet, but he’s about to become one of the best new voices in indie film. “Columbus,” which premiered to acclaim at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, is a hypnotic and intimate debut that’s bound to leave an impression on anyone who sees it.

Read More: Supercut Guru Kogonada: How He Leapt from Small Screens to Sundance Next with the Mysterious ‘Columbus

Kogonada’s debut stars John Cho as Jin, a man who finds himself stranded in the titular Indiana town after his father falls gravely ill. It’s here where he strikes up a friendship with an architectural enthusiast (Haley Lu Richardson) struggling with her own parental issues. The pair spark a connection rooted in soul-searching.

Entertainment Weekly has debuted the official trailer for the movie, and to say it looks visually striking would be the understatement of the year. Working with cinematographer Elisha Christian, Kogonada draws your attention to architecture and blocking like a master filmmaker.

Columbus” opens in select theaters August 4. Watch the trailer below.

Related storiesHere Are The 555 Times Michael Bay Has Used Product Placement -- Watch'The Untamed': Amat Escalante's Insane Alien-Centric Erotic Horror Film Gets a Wild New Trailer -- Watch'Person to Person' Trailer: Michael Cera Stars In A Summer Indie That Evokes the Best of Woody Allen »

- Zack Sharf

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‘The Untamed’: Amat Escalante’s Insane Alien-Centric Erotic Horror Film Gets a Wild New Trailer — Watch

11 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“Untamed” is an appropriate description of Amat Escalante’s latest film, which uses a relatively benign plotline — an unhappy couple have secrets to spare, and then a compelling newcomer arrives in their town — to frame up one of the most wild films of the year.

The Untamed” follows married couple Alejandra and Angel, who are struggling to connect thanks to both petty domestic squabbles and a massive mystery that could upend not just their relationship, but their entire family and their provincial city. When the mysterious Veronica arrives and befriends Alejandra’s brother Fabian, she introduces some unexpected new elements into everyone’s lives, and no one will be the same. Sounds standard, right? Hardly.

Read More: 10 Great Erotic Thrillers to Stream on Netflix and Amazon Prime Right Now

Soon, Veronica and her new acquaintances are trotting off into the nearby woods — where, not to worry, a meteorite has recently landed — to meet a mysterious creature that offers up both pleasure (yes, that kind) and pain to the various people who come to interact with it, including Alejandra, Angel, and Fabian. Part horror story, part sci-fi outing, and part “wait, what the hell is that thing?,” the film deftly blends relatable problems with some very out of the box solutions.

The film was a hit on the festival circuit, where it earned Escalante accolades at events as diverse as Fantastic Fest (so you know it’s insane) and Venice (where the director won the Silver Lion and was nominated for both the Golden Lion and the Queer Lion), and it’s now bound for a limited release, all the better to hit more audiences right in the ol’ shock and awe.

Put it this way: you’re guaranteed to gasp at least once — a big one, borne of shock and maybe fear — during this trailer, and this is just two minutes of the entire film. Check it out below, and prepare yourself.

The Untamed” will hit limited release on Friday, July 21.

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Related storiesHere Are The 555 Times Michael Bay Has Used Product Placement -- Watch'Columbus' Trailer: Discover Why This John Cho Drama Is One of the Great Indie Debuts of 2017'Person to Person' Trailer: Michael Cera Stars In A Summer Indie That Evokes the Best of Woody Allen »

- Kate Erbland

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John Cho and Haley Lu Richardson Form a Bond in Trailer for kogonada’s ‘Columbus’

13 hours ago | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

The path to becoming a director is one generally accompanied by a profound knowledge of film history, but that passion is rarely more public then when it comes to kogonada. After years of working on visually detailed video essays for The Criterion Collection, Sight & Sound, and more, he’s now made his directorial debut with Columbus, an impeccably composed drama of quiet humanity and curiosity. If his nickname wasn’t enough of a hint, traces of Yasujirō Ozu’s influence can be found, but this first-time director has created something distinctly his own. Ahead of an August release, the first trailer has now been released.

“As these two parallel stories are told, and eventually converge in a wonderfully blocked sequence, Columbus unfolds with a patient rhythm, comprised of characters who are resistant to wearing their emotions on their sleeves,” I said in my review. “This leads to making their interactions all the more genuine as we first must acquaint ourselves with the location and history before peeling back layers. Richardson, who recently made an indelible impression in The Edge of Seventeen, is the stand-out here, playing Casey with both an independent streak (especially when it comes to the advances of her library co-worker played by (Rory Culkin) and a longing for resolution as it pertains with letting go of her burden with her mother.”

Check out the trailer below via EW and we’ll update when a not-so-terrible player is available.

When his father, a renowned architecture scholar, falls suddenly ill during a speaking tour, Jin (John Cho) finds himself stranded in Columbus, Indiana – a small Midwestern city that is celebrated for its many significant modernist buildings. Jin strikes up a friendship with Casey (Haley Lu Richardson), a young architecture enthusiast who works at the local library. As their intimacy develops, Jin and Casey explore both the town and their conflicted emotions: Jin’s estranged relationship with his father and Casey’s reluctance to leave Columbus and her mother. With its naturalistic rhythms and empathy for the complexities of families, debut director Kogonada’s Columbus unfolds as a gently drifting, deeply absorbing conversation. With strong supporting turns from Parker Posey, Rory Culkin, and Michelle Forbes, Columbus is a showcase for its director’s striking eye for the way physical space can affect emotions.

Columbus opens on August 4. »

- Jordan Raup

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New Trailer For ‘Columbus’ Finds John Cho & Haley Lu Richardson Doing Some Soul Searching

14 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

John Cho has been on edges of being a big name for a while now, possessing the talents and the looks to conceivably have a huge, Hollywood career but never quite landing similar roles as say, his “Star Trek” co-stars. He’s shown throughout the years that his range is big, going from broad comedy in the “Harold & Kumar” series, to understated, leading man smoldering in short lived TV series “Selfie” to action hero as Hikaru Sulu.

Continue reading New Trailer For ‘Columbus’ Finds John Cho & Haley Lu Richardson Doing Some Soul Searching at The Playlist. »

- Ally Johnson

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Haley Lu Richardson in First Trailer for Outstanding Film 'Columbus'

22 June 2017 4:06 PM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

"Suddenly the place I'd lived my whole life felt different." A trailer has finally arrived for one of the best films from the Sundance Film Festival this year. Columbus is the feature directorial debut of a filmmaker known as "Kogonada", a Korean cinephile who previously made video essays that achieved quite a bit of acclaim online. Columbus stars Haley Lu Richardson as a young woman from the town of Columbus, Indiana, a small place known for its remarkable and innovative architecture (and it's all actually real). Her story intertwines with a Korean man played by John Cho who visits because his father, an architect, is in a coma. The cast also includes Parker Posey, Erin Allegretti, Rory Culkin, and Jim Dougherty. We published a glowing review of this from Sundance, and it's definitely worth your time to discover. See below. Here's the first official trailer (+ poster) for Kogonada's Columbus, originally from EW.com: A Korean-born man (John Cho) finds himself stuck in »

- Alex Billington

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YouTube Red to Launch New Comedy Shows from Rob Huebel, Ryan Hansen

22 June 2017 1:13 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

YouTube Red has ordered two new comedy series from Rob Huebel and Ryan Hansen.

“Do You Want to See a Dead Body?” is an eight-episode comedy series that follows Huebel–who has previously starred on “Childrens Hospital” and “Transparent”–and his celebrity friends who join him on adventures that see them frolicking at the beach, getting tacos, and yes, seeing a dead body. Celebrity guest stars include Adam Scott, Judy Greer, Terry Crews, Craig Robinson, and John Cho along with many more. Huebel, Owen Burke, Nick Jasenovec, and Jonathan Stern serve as executive producers. The series is being produced by »

- Joe Otterson

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BAMcinemaFest Review: ‘Gemini’ is a Fantastic Neo-Noir

14 June 2017 11:13 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

There is a moment in Aaron Katz’s Gemini when Jill LeBeau (Lola Kirke), who has become the prime suspect in a murder, needs to hide from the police and find a disguise. Out of every possible option, she goes for a blonde wig with bangs, something that makes her look like Barbara Stanwyck in Double Indemnity. She looks perhaps even more conspicuous in her costume than in her daily look, but she manages to slink from law enforcement time and again because Gemini is the kind of film that exists in “movie universe,” a self-referential place where characters, unbeknownst to them, move according to the whims of their creators.

Gemini is also a fantastic neo-noir set in the Thief-inspired Los Angeles of Drive, an upside-down city, as captured in the surrealistic opening credits by cinematographer Andrew Reed, where morals have all but vanished, leaving behind only a group of »

- Jose Solís

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Tender Idiosyncrasies: BAMcinemaFEST 2017

14 June 2017 5:27 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Princess CydNow in its ninth season, BAMcinemaFest has become New York’s premiere festival for gems of American indie cinema, expertly culled from the best of the fests thus far this year.  While hosting works from numerous local Brooklynites like Alex Ross Perry, whose Golden Exits will close the event, the intimate festival also boasts an exceptional assortment of films from across the country, this year no short on mysteries, overt and clandestine. The selection’s varying styles are all a testament to the diversity of independent filmmaking that is alive and well in America today.Director Aaron Katz returns with Gemini, a lo-fi L.A.-set noir circling around a movie starlet Heather (Zoe Kravitz) and her devoted assistant Jill (Lola Kirke). Always the expert examiner of relationships in miniature, Katz plumbs beyond the quandary of the employer-employee transactional one here to capture the fragile peculiarities and tender idiosyncrasies of a female friendship. »

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Summer TV Preview: 20 New and Returning Comedies Worth Watching

6 June 2017 8:53 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Television used to take a breather during the summer, letting audiences focus instead on intermittent relaxation, sun-drenched weekends, various fruit-based drinks and more life beyond the screen.

But there’s no such thing as summer vacation any more in TV land. Not only are plenty of spring series continuing into the summer (or even the fall, in the case of “Twin Peaks”), but the broadcast and cable networks, plus the streaming services, have a jam-packed lineup of new shows waiting in the wings.

In other words, put away your swimsuit. You won’t be needing it — there’s too much to watch. As part of IndieWire’s annual tradition to highlight the best of what television has to offer in the summer months, our team has lined up highlights of the best new and returning programs. Crank up the AC, pull down the blinds and dig in.

First up: A »

- Steve Greene, Liz Shannon Miller, Ben Travers, Michael Schneider and Hanh Nguyen

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Summer TV Preview: 20 New and Returning Comedies Worth Watching

6 June 2017 8:53 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Television used to take a breather during the summer, letting audiences focus instead on intermittent relaxation, sun-drenched weekends, various fruit-based drinks and more life beyond the screen.

But there’s no such thing as summer vacation any more in TV land. Not only are plenty of spring series continuing into the summer (or even the fall, in the case of “Twin Peaks”), but the broadcast and cable networks, plus the streaming services, have a jam-packed lineup of new shows waiting in the wings.

In other words, put away your swimsuit. You won’t be needing it — there’s too much to watch. As part of IndieWire’s annual tradition to highlight the best of what television has to offer in the summer months, our team has lined up highlights of the best new and returning programs. Crank up the AC, pull down the blinds and dig in.

First up: A »

- Steve Greene, Liz Shannon Miller, Ben Travers, Michael Schneider and Hanh Nguyen

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Kristen Stewart Is Now a Director, and Speaks For Herself: ‘Ask Me Anything!’ — Exclusive Video

31 May 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

When Kristen Stewart goes to Cannes, she’s usually promoting a movie directed by someone else — like Olivier Assayas’ “Personal Shopper,” which debuted on the Riviera last year. The actress’s Cannes anxiety usually derives from wanting to represent her director correctly, to get out the right message. But this year’s different.

“I’m not working for anyone but myself,” she says, beaming. “Ask me anything!”

Stewart came to Cannes this year as the director of her first short, the 17-minute “Come Swim.” She and her producers at Starlight Studios pitched the film to women’s website Refinery29, which also backed her chum Chloe Sevigne’s short “Kitty: The Movie.” They helped Stewart to develop her rough outline, in which she described an image of a giant wave “getting bigger and bigger” that “never breaks.” Stewart already knew just the Australian underwater photographer to shoot it. Indeed, the film’s opening shot is a stunner.

The actress has been wanting to make movies since she was 10 years old, watching her show-business parents put in 16-hour days. Actress-director Jodie Foster, her co-star in David Fincher’s “Panic Room,” was surprised it took Stewart so long to take the directing helm. “You seemed like someone who wants to make something,” she told her recently.

Indeed she did. Stewart rallied her crew and cast (led by rookie Josh Kaye) around her pearl of an idea for an experimental, impressionistic essay on fear and water. They moved from asking her what she needed to becoming enthusiastic collaborators. “I’m a control freak,” she said. “I hate something I can’t wrestle down.” But on set, she got a kick out of watching her team get excited. “I saw them switch on,” she said. “I planted that seed!”

She was afraid that filming might present a question that she did not know how to answer. “I never ran into that wall,” she said. “It informed itself every day. It was like excavating this pearl and everyone could see it. I knew where we were going to be at any given moment.”

Like her Cannes sisters Jessica Chastain, Nicole Kidman, and Isabelle Huppert, Stewart enthusiastically supports encouraging more women directors like Kelly Reichardt (“Certain Women”). “Nobody can tell the stories she tells,” said Stewart.

And she’d rather talk about her films than many of the silly questions that come her way. “Anything that takes focus away from the work is usually media and money,” she said.

While Stewart is developing material for herself to direct, she has no interest in taking on the arduous job of producing; she’d rather let someone else help her to realize her goals as a director and actress.

Since Stewart debuted “Come Swim” at Sundance, she has already directed a Chvrches music video, and wants to turn political for a short about gun control. As an actress, she’s wrapped indie biopic “Lizzie,” in which she stars as 19th-century murderess Lizzie Borden; action feature “Underwater” (Twentieth Century Fox); and is now prepping her role as Savannah Knoop in Justin Kelly’s movie about the infamous fictional persona Jt Leroy, opposite Laura Dern as writer and con artist Laura Albert.

At a Cinema Francais dinner, I asked Juliette Binoche if she’d like to join Stewart on another Assayas film. “Of course!” she replied. Stewart says they just have to wait to see what Assayas dreams up for them.

Related storiesHere Are The 555 Times Michael Bay Has Used Product Placement -- Watch'Columbus' Trailer: Discover Why This John Cho Drama Is One of the Great Indie Debuts of 2017'The Untamed': Amat Escalante's Insane Alien-Centric Erotic Horror Film Gets a Wild New Trailer -- Watch »

- Anne Thompson

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Film Acquisition Rundown: Focus Buys ‘The Little Stranger,’ Oscilloscope Picks Up ‘Brimstone & Glory’ and More

26 May 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Keep up with the wild and wooly world of indie film acquisitions with our weekly Rundown of everything that’s been picked up around the globe. Check out last week’s Rundown here.

Focus Features has acquired the worldwide rights to “The Little Stranger,” excluding the U.K., France and Switzerland, where it will be distributed by Pathé. Academy Award nominee Lenny Abrahamson (“Room”) will direct the film, a chilling ghost story, which will begin production in the U.K. this summer for release in 2018. “The Little Stranger” will star Academy Award nominee Charlotte Rampling, Domhnall Gleeson, Ruth Wilson and Will Poulter. Lucinda Coxon, who wrote the screenplay adaptation of Focus’ “The Danish Girl,” has adapted “The Little Stranger” from Sarah Waters’ acclaimed 2009 novel of the same name.

In a remote English village after the close of World War II, a local practitioner, Dr. Faraday (Gleeson), is called to the »

- Graham Winfrey

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GLAAD Report: Major Film Studios Fail to Increase Lgbt Representation

25 May 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Major film studios broadly fell short last year of increasing the number of characters in their movies that are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (Lgbtq), according to a new analysis issued Thursday by GLAAD.

Only 23 of the 125 films counted by the New York-based media advocacy group featured an Lgbtq character last year, accounting for less than 20 percent of films produced by the seven studios GLAAD rated in its report. The organization rates studios’ efforts as excellent, good, insufficient, poor, or failing.

No film studio has earned an “excellent” rating in the five years GLAAD has tracked Lgbtq representation. Universal Studios earned the highest mark, rating “insufficient” but it drew praise for films like “Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising,” which featured an “unexpectedly well-handled subplot” involving a gay fraternity brother’s wedding engagement and how the pending nuptials strained his friendship with his former fraternity brother, Teddy, played by Zac Efron. »

- Ricardo Lopez

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Screen Media Films acquires 'Literally, Right Before Aaron'

24 May 2017 2:06 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The film had its world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival last month.

Screen Media Films has acquired North American rights for Ryan Eggold’s Literally, Right Before Aaron and plans a theatrical release later this year. 

Literally, Right Before Aaron centres on Adam who gets a call from his ex-girlfriend Allison telling him she’s getting married, Adam realises he is just not ready to say goodbye.

Against the advice of his best friend Mark, Adam decides to drive back home to San Francisco to attend the wedding in hopes of convincing himself and everyone else, including her fiancé Aaron, that he is truly happy for her.

After a series of embarrassing, hilarious, and humbling situations, Adam discovers the comedy in romance, the tragedy of letting go and the hard truth about growing up.

The film from Rizk Pictures and Is This Reel, stars Justin Long, Cobie Smulders, Ryan Hansen, John Cho, [link »

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Screen Media Nabs Rights to Ryan Eggold’s ‘Literally, Right Before Aaron’

24 May 2017 1:11 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Screen Media Films has acquired the North American rights to Ryan Eggold’s new comedy-drama “Literally, Right Before Aaron,” slated for a theatrical release later this year. The film, which had its world premiere at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival last month, stars Justin Long, Cobie Smulders, Ryan Hansen, John Cho, Kristen Schaal, Peter Gallagher, Dana Delany, Lea Thompson and Luis Guzman.

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The seriocomic “Literally, Right Before Aaron” follows the aftermath of a love affair between Adam (Long) and his ex-girlfriend Allison (Smulders), when Adam gets word of Allison’s upcoming wedding. Realizing that he’s not quite ready to bid farewell to their relationship, Adam decides to attend the wedding in an embarrassing attempt to convince himself, and those around him, that he has moved on.

The movie marks the directorial feature film debut for Eggold (best known for his work as »

- Emily Mae Czachor

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Ryan Eggold’s Tribeca Film ‘Literally, Right Before Aaron’ Lands At Screen Media

24 May 2017 11:35 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Screen Media Films has secured the North American rights to Ryan Eggold directorial debut film Literally, Right Before Aaron, which had its world premiere at last month’s Tribeca Film fest.  Starring Justin Long, Cobie Smulders, Ryan Hansen, John Cho, Kristen Schaal, Peter Gallagher, Dana Delany, Lea Thompson, and Luis Guzmán, the film will bow in theaters later this year. The comedy follows Adam (Long) who, not ready to let his engaged ex-girlfriend Allison (Smulders)… »

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Justin Long's Wedding Comedy 'Literally, Right Before Aaron' Goes to Screen Media

24 May 2017 10:18 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Screen Media Films has acquired the North American rights to Cobie Smulders and Justin Long's wedding comedy Literally, Right Before Aaron

John Cho, Kristen Schaal, Peter Gallagher, Dana Delany and Lea Thompson are also among the cast of the film, which debuted at the Tribeca Film Festival last month and will be released in theaters later this year. It marked the feature directorial debut of The Blacklist actor Ryan Eggold who also wrote and edited the film. Eggold also produced with Cassandra Kulukundis, Alexandra Rizk Keane, Nancy Leopardi and Ross Kohn.

Literally, Right Before Aaron stars Long as a heartbroken man who returns home to attend the wedding »

- Ashley Lee

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