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Cary Grant's LSD Trips, His Mother's Secret Mental Illness & More Revelations from New Documentary

  • PEOPLE.com
Cary Grant's LSD Trips, His Mother's Secret Mental Illness & More Revelations from New Documentary
Cary Grant, one of Hollywood’s greatest leading men, was always discomfited by the disconnect he felt between his public image — debonair, to the same degree that Napoleon could be called powerful — and a nagging internal emptiness. He alluded to it in his most famous comment (“Everyone wants to be Cary Grant. Even I want to be Cary Grant”), but the private unhappiness went a lot deeper — as you’ll learn from the fascinating new Showtime documentary Becoming Cary Grant.

“For many years I have cautiously peered from behind the face of a man known as Cary Grant. The protection
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The Definitive Romantic Comedies: 10-1

  • SoundOnSight
Well, we’ve finally reached the summit: the 10 most definitive romantic comedies of all time. Unlike the other sections of this list, there is not a movie here that approaches “bad.” As always, some are better than others, despite the order. But one thing is for sure: if you plan to have a rom-com binge-a-thon soon, this is where you start, no questions asked. In fact, after reading this, you should go do that and report back.

courtesy of reverseshot.com 10. Some Like It Hot (1959)

What’s funnier than men dressing in drag? Depends on who you ask. It’s Billy Wilder again with a fictional story of two musicians – Joe (Tony Curtis) and Jerry (Jack Lemmon) – who witness the St. Valentine’s Day massacre in Chicago and leave town. But, since the mob has ties everywhere, they need to disguise themselves as best they can: as women in an
See full article at SoundOnSight »

‘City Lights’: A Silent Movie Still Entertaining in the Era of Sound

Looking for any excuse, Landon Palmer and Scott Beggs are using the 2012 Sight & Sound poll results as a reason to take different angles on the best movies of all time. Every week, they’ll discuss another entry in the list, dissecting old favorites from odd angles, discovering movies they haven’t seen before and asking you to join in on the conversation. Of course it helps if you’ve seen the movie because there will be plenty of spoilers. This week, they revel in the unadulterated delight of City Lights and imagine it as an elderly film that still feels young at heart. In the #50 (tied) movie on the list, The Tramp (Charlie Chaplin) falls in love with a blind flower girl (Virginia Cherrill) and tries everything he can to earn money, even as life throws him repeatedly under the bus. But why is it one of the best movies of all time? Scott:
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

The Definitive Romantic Comedies: 10-1

  • SoundOnSight
Well, we’ve finally reached the summit: the 10 most definitive romantic comedies of all time. Unlike the other sections of this list, there is not a movie here that approaches “bad.” As always, some are better than others, despite the order. But one thing is for sure: if you plan to have a rom-com binge-a-thon soon, this is where you start, no questions asked. In fact, after reading this, you should go do that and report back.

courtesy of reverseshot.com

10. Some Like It Hot (1959)

What’s funnier than men dressing in drag? Depends on who you ask. It’s Billy Wilder again with a fictional story of two musicians – Joe (Tony Curtis) and Jerry (Jack Lemmon) – who witness the St. Valentine’s Day massacre in Chicago and leave town. But, since the mob has ties everywhere, they need to disguise themselves as best they can: as women in an
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Maureen O’Hara, Richard Dreyfuss, Mel Brooks and Margaret O’Brien Join Lineup for 2014 TCM Classic Film Festival

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) has added an exciting roster of screen legends and beloved titles to the 2014 TCM Classic Film Festival, including appearances by Maureen O’Hara, Mel Brooks and Margaret O’Brien, plus a two-film tribute to Academy Award®-winner Richard Dreyfuss. Marking its fifth year, the TCM Classic Film Festival will take place April 10-13, 2014, in Hollywood. The gathering will coincide with TCM’s 20th anniversary as a leading authority in classic film.

O’Hara will present the world premiere restoration of John Ford’s Oscar®-winning Best Picture How Green Was My Valley (1941), while Brooks will appear at a screening of his western comedy Blazing Saddles (1974). O’Brien will be on-hand for Vincente Minnelli’s perennial musical favorite Meet Me in St. Louis (1944), starring Judy Garland. The tribute to Dreyfuss will consist of a double feature of two of his most popular roles: his Oscar®-winning performance
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Rare footage of Charlie Chaplin directing City Lights

Rare footage of the legendary Charlie Chaplin directing a scene where The Tramp meets a blind flower girl in City Lights has been included on the new Criterion Collection edition of the classic 1931 movie. The footage was taken on set by Chaplin's friend Ralph Barton.  Historian Hooman Mehran narrates the footage, which shows Chaplin working with the untrained Virginia Cherrill to get the performance he had in mind. The scene apparently took hundreds of takes to get right. It's an interesting look at the man behind the scenes, and definitely something Chaplin fans will appreciate; check it out here...

The Criterion Collection edition of City Lights is available now.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Blu-ray Review: Chaplin Section of Criterion Collection Now Includes ‘City Lights’

  • HollywoodChicago.com
Chicago – Charlie Chaplin’s “City Lights” used to be more widely considered to be one of the best films ever made. In early editions of the Sight & Sound poll (the every-decade poll of film historians and critics), it appeared in the top ten regularly. Its esteem seems to have slipped a bit over the decades as some now prefer other Chaplin to “Lights” (me, I adore “Great Dictator” and “Gold Rush,” both available in Criterion Blu-ray editions as well) but the new Criterion edition reminds one why so many people consider this one of the best. It’s still a glorious gem.

Rating: 5.0/5.0

I think one of the reasons that “City Lights” maintained such esteemfor so long is the fact that it’s Undeniably one of the most influential films ever made. When one thinks of Chaplin, the mind first goes to his tramp character, who was arguably never more
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Criterion Collection: City Lights | Blu-ray Review

  • ioncinema
The biggest surprise about this month’s release of Charles Chaplin’s City Lights (1931) is that it wasn’t already a part of Criterion’s prestigious collection. Though several of his other masterworks have already been featured, it’s this 1931 title that many deem to be the quintessential of all his Little Tramp films, a light and breezy comedy that’s as effortlessly comical as it is undeniably moving. Credited as his last silent film, it stands as one of the most revered silent films ever made, famously released after the advent of sound due to Chaplin’s steadfast obsession with cinema as a silent art. And to make the Tramp speak would only have resulted in tantamount sacrilege, a magic and mystery that would have evaporated with the insistent new technology.

A tramp (Charles Chaplin) wanders the streets of Los Angeles, involved in a series of comic scenarios before
See full article at ioncinema »

Rare Home Movies Show Charlie Chaplin Directing a Scene That Took a Staggering 342 Takes to Get Right

  • Movies.com
Here's some rare 16 mm home-movie footage of Charlie Chaplin directing an actress he discovered when he sat next to her at a boxing match. The movie is City Lights, and the year is 1931. The actress is then-unknown Virginia Cherrill, who probably didn't know what she was getting into when Chaplin, an insane perfectionist, cast her to play the blind flower monger in his film. Chaplin was a maniac on set. A real ball buster. At one point during the making of City Lights, he actually fired Cherrill (who made about $150 a week) when she arrived late to set following an appointment. Chaplin attempted to replace her with Georgia Hale, but too much had already been shot, forcing Chaplin to complete the film with his original actress. Oh, and she wasn't the only one Chaplin...

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See full article at Movies.com »

'City Lights' (Criterion Collection) Blu-ray Review

Charlie Chaplin's films have stood the test of time not necessarily because they are funny, at least not in today's terms of what classifies a film as a "comedy", but because the best of them are amusing, clever, witty, smart, emotional and, most of all, simple. But don't let their simplicity deceive you. The level of simplicity a film such as Chaplin's 1931 feature City Lights is not easily achieved. In fact, making something look simple may in fact be the hardest thing to accomplish in cinema. Without sci-fi plotlines, outside forces or even additional characters having an effect on the plot, City Lights is the story of Chaplin's iconic Tramp and the love he finds for a blind woman selling flowers on a street corner. As much as comedy has changed in 80+ years, a story such as this could hardly be told in today's cinemas and garner any kind of attention.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

New on Video: ‘City Lights’ enters the Criterion Collection

  • SoundOnSight
City Lights

Written by Charles Chaplin

Directed by Charles Chaplin

USA, 1931

As they have with The Gold Rush, Modern Times, The Great Dictator, and Monsieur Verdoux, The Criterion Collection has released another stunning Blu-ray/DVD transfer of a Charlie Chaplin classic, rife with a surplus of features. City Lights (1931), which Criterion itself calls, “the most cherished film by Charlie Chaplin … his ultimate Little Tramp chronicle,” is certainly a film easy to love and admire; it’s The Tramp at his most endearingly hapless, his best of intentions always hilariously undermined, and it’s perhaps the most emotionally affecting Chaplin film.

The Kid has the unforgettable Jackie Coogan desperately reaching out for his newfound father figure, and throughout, the young boy and Chaplin tug at the heartstrings. But City Lights, especially with its transcendent final scene, trumps the more manipulatively straightforward sentiment in the earlier feature. Much has been made of this supremely effective conclusion,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

342 Takes: Chaplin, the Original Fincher

The idea of directors as perfectionists isn't new by any standard, but in today's terms it seems David Fincher is often cited as the perfectionist director most guilty of several takes. Even recently a Missouri newspaper quoted Fincher's Gone Girl producer Cean Chaffin saying Fincher was averaging something like 50 takes per scene. Of course you also have the Guinness Book of World Records saying it took Stanley Kubrick 127 takes to get the scene where Shelley Duvall swings a bat at Jack Nicholson just right in The Shining, of course the factual reality of that is in question as it's said a two-shot scene between Danny Lloyd and Scatman Crothers took 140 takes. Then you have the likes of Akira Kurosawa's perfectionism and Jackie Chan's multiple takes due to a lot of stunt work and countless others. However, when it comes to a lot of takes nothing beats the
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

New DVD Blu-ray: 'Man of Steel,' 'Turbo,' 'Frances Ha'

  • Moviefone
Moviefone's Top DVD of the Week:

"Man of Steel"

What's It About? In Zack Snyder's Superman reboot, "Man of Steel," the young Clark Kent (Henry Cavill) goes on a journey to discover his origin and to better understand his super-human powers. However, when the Kryptonian military leader, General Zod (Michael Shannon), threatens the fate of earth, Clark must face his past to save his planet.

Why We're In: "Man of Steel" is full of spectacular action sequences that will quench any superhero junkie or comic book fiend's appetite. However, Snyder's film was ranked as one of Moviefone's Best Movies of 2013 (So Far) primarily because it successfully rebooted the Superman story after previous failed attempts. It may be your typical Blockbuster fare, but it's undoubtedly a thrilling ride.

Watch: A special feature from the "Man of Steel" Blu-ray (Video)

Moviefone's Top Blu-ray of the Week:

"Noseferatu"

What's It About? F.W. Murnau's 1922 silent "Nosferatu,
See full article at Moviefone »

Hitchcock Week in Sf: Watch the Movie, Listen to Live Orchestral Accompaniment

San Francisco Symphony salutes Alfred Hitchcock: Halloween movies and Hitchcock movie music (photo: San Francisco Symphony and Cary Grant in ’North by Northwest’) The San Francisco Symphony will celebrate Alfred Hitchcock movies and their music scores beginning at 8 p.m. on Halloween eve, October 30, 2013, at Davies Symphony Hall. During Hitchcock Film Week, the San Francisco Symphony will perform the scores for Hitchcock’s Psycho, The Lodger: A Tale of the London Fog, and the world premiere presentation of Vertigo’s full score performed live, in addition to excerpts from To Catch a Thief, Strangers on a Train, Dial M for Murder, and North by Northwest. Alfred Hitchcock’s granddaughter Tere Carrubba will introduce the Psycho presentation on October 30. Hitchcock received his fifth and final Best Director Academy Award nomination for this cheaply made — but highly successful — 1960 thriller starring Anthony Perkins, Vera Miles, John Gavin, and Best Supporting Actress Oscar nominee Janet Leigh.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: City Lights

  • Disc Dish
Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Nov. 12, 2013

Price: Blu-ray/DVD Combo $39.95

Studio: Criterion

The 1931 silent comedy-drama City Lights, one of the most cherished films by Charlie Chaplin (Modern Times), is also his ultimate Little Tramp chronicle.

Writer-director-star Chaplin achieved new levels of grace, in both physical comedy and dramatic poignancy, with this silent tale of a lovable vagrant falling for a young blind woman who sells flowers on the street (Virginia Cherrill) and mistakes him for a millionaire.

Though this Depression-era smash was made after the advent of sound, Chaplin remained steadfast in his love for the expressive beauty of the pre-talkie form. The result was the epitome of his art and the crowning achievement of silent comedy.

Criterion’s Blu-ray/DVD Combo of the classic movie includes the following features:

• New, restored 4K digital film transfer, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray

• New audio commentary by Charlie Chaplin biographer Jeffrey Vance

Chaplin Today: “City Lights,
See full article at Disc Dish »

The Dildo That Never Was and Grant Quote: 'Expect the Biographical Worst'

Cary Grant and Randolph Scott marriages (See previous post: “Randolph Scott and Cary Grant: Gay Lovers?“) The English-born Cary Grant was married five times: Charles Chaplin’s City Lights leading lady Virginia Cherrill (1934-1935), Woolworth heiress Barbara Hutton (1942-1945), Grant’s Every Girl Should Be Married and Room for One More co-star Betsy Drake (1949-1962), Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice and Heaven Can Wait Best Supporting Actress Oscar nominee Dyan Cannon (1965-1968), and Barbara Harris (1981-1986). Note: Cary Grant’s last wife was not the Barbara Harris of Nashville, Family Plot, and A Thousand Clowns fame. Cary Grant died at age 82 after suffering a stroke on November 29, 1986, while preparing for a performance of his one-man show, A Conversation with Cary Grant, in Davenport, Iowa. (Photo: Cary Grant and Randolph Scott ca. 1933.) The Virginia-born Randolph Scott was married twice: wealthy socialite Mariana duPont Somerville (1936-1939) and Patricia Stillman, from 1943 to his
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Under The Radar: Chaplin’s Girl

The first movie book I ever purchased was a discarded library copy of Theodore Huff’s landmark biography of my cinematic hero, Charlie Chaplin. (The price was ten cents.) In the years since then I’ve amassed more volumes about Chaplin than any other individual…and apparently there’s no end in sight. But had I not read Laura Wagner’s review of Chaplin’s Girl: The Life and Loves of Virginia Cherrill in a recent issue of Classic Images I wouldn’t have known it existed. This unusual biography was published in London by Simon & Schuster, but so far as I can tell it was never officially issued in the U.S. (I had no trouble finding a copy at...

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See full article at Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy »

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