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Cine-Sunday: ‘Young Bruce Lee’ Review

Stars: Aarif Rahman, Tony Leung, Christy Chung | Written by Robert Lee, Manfred Wong | Directed by Raymond Yip, Manfred Wong

Review by Baron Fortnightly

“Known as ‘The Little Dragon’ to legions of adoring fans, Bruce Lee is regarded by many as the greatest martial arts legend who ever lived. From his birth on November 27th 1940 to his departure for San Francisco in 1959, discover how Bruce Lee lived through war and persecution and survived the brutal street-gangs of 1950′s Hong Kong before going on to live his dreams.”

Young Bruce Lee is a Hong Kong biopic based on the recollections of Bruce Lee’s siblings, mainly the first-hand experiences of his younger brother Robert Lee, author of the book “Bruce Lee: My Brother”. From the opening credits you can tell this film has high production values, and why not, it’s an incredible look at the world’s most famous martial
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

China 3D unveils $13m crime thriller 'The Death Notice'

China 3D unveils $13m crime thriller 'The Death Notice'
Port Of Call director Philip Yung to helm detective thriller.

Hong Kong-based China 3D Digital Entertainment launched a new slate of six titles at Hong Kong Filmart, including $13m (Hk$100m) detective crime thriller The Death Notice (working title).

Directed by Philip Yung, whose last film Port Of Call is a multiple award-winning crime thriller, the new picture is a co-production with Chinese streamlining platform iQiyi. A-list actors are expected to be cast.

The Death Notice was originally published as an Internet novel. It has subsequently been adapted into a highly popular Internet drama with reportedly a billion click-throughs.

Also on China 3D’s new slate is The Menu, which is the big screen adaptation of Hktv’s series and reunites the series director Pun Man Hung with his cast Gregory Wong, Catherine Chau and Kate Yeung; 29+1, which is based on actress-director-playwright Kearen Pang’s theatre production of the same name and stars Chrissie Chau and Joyce
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘Lost In Hong Kong’ Heading For $100 Million China Opening Weekend

‘Lost In Hong Kong’ Heading For $100 Million China Opening Weekend
Lost In Hong Kong,” has got off to a screaming start at the Chinese box office. It clocked up $70.6 million in its first two days of release, putting it on course for a $100 million weekend.

The comedy opened on Friday (Sept. 25) with a $31.1 million opening day, which was topped up by $1.6 million of midnight screenings. That made it the largest opening day for a Chinese movie, and the third largest opening in Chinese history, behind “Furious 7” and “Avengers: Age of Ultron.”

Preliminary Saturday (Sept. 26) figures from Ent Group, show the film hauling in a further $38.4 million on its second day.

Those numbers were achieved on a colossal number of screens, some 20,000, producing 94,000 screenings on Friday and some 95,000 on Saturday.

The second placed film, another new opener “The Third Way of Love,” starring Liu Yifei and Bai Beier (who also appears in “Lost in Hong Kong”), managed only $5.31 million in its first two days.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: ‘Lost in Hong Kong’

Like Ashley Madison subscribers, a bra designer pursues an elusive transgression in “Lost in Hong Kong,” a tamer but still agreeable follow-up to helmer-thesp Xu Zheng’s directorial debut, the road-trip comedy “Lost in Thailand,” which made history as China’s highest-grossing domestic film until this past July. Trading the earlier film’s goofy fish-out-of-water gags for robust action acrobatics and fail-safe family drama, the laffer induces the warm-and-fuzzies as an ode to Hong Kong cinema and its role in mainland Gen-Xers’ sentimental coming of age. Although it’ll take a miracle to dethrone reigning B.O. champ “Monster Hunt,” the pic will still be heartily embraced at home and find a fair response abroad via day-and-date openings Stateside, in Blighty and Oz.

The pic completes a trilogy of road movies originating with “Lost on Journey” (2010), written and directed by the Hong Kong duo of Raymond Yip and Manfred Wong
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Hong Kong’s Tvb Says Shaw Bros To Make Movie Comeback

Shaw Brothers, once the largest film production company in Asia, is poised to make a comeback under a new plan unveiled by Hong Kong’s leading TV broadcaster to spread its tentacles in filmmaking.

Television Broadcasts Limited (Tvb), which owns Shaw Brothers, last week revealed seven new film projects which it is to co-produce with Hong Kong and mainland Chinese film companies.

Partner firms include Media Asia and Mega-Vision Project Workshop. Hong Kong directors including Wong Jing and Lawrence Cheng Tan-shui will be involved in the projects.

At the event at FilMart, Tvb said filmmaking would be a core part of its business and it would “continue Shaw Brothers’ tradition of producing quality products.” Its combined investments in the seven pictures, was estimated by Tvb executive Virginia Lok Yee-ling as at least Hk$100 million (Us$13 million).

Founded in the 1920s, Shaw Brothers produced about 900 films before ceasing production in the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Media Asia touts Break Up 100, Triumph

  • ScreenDaily
Hong Kong’s Media Asia has unveiled a slate of new productions at Filmart, including Lawrence Cheng’s romantic comedy Break Up 100 and a big screen adaptation of hit TV series Triumph In The Sky.

Co-directed by Wilson Yip and Matt Chow, Triumph In The Sky is produced by Tommy Leung and will star Julian Cheung, Francis Ng and Louis Koo.

Starring Ekin Cheng and Chrissie Chau, Break Up 100 tells the story of couple who try to run a business together after breaking up and reuniting 99 times.

The slate also includes Johnnie To’s Don’t Go Breaking My Heart 2, starring Koo, Miriam Yeung and Vic Chou, along with romantic drama She Remembers, He Forgets, directed by Adam Wong (The Way We Dance) and produced by Teddy Robin and Saville Chan.

In addition, Leon Lai is making his directorial debut for Media Asia with action drama Wine War, in which he also stars. Lai is also
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Bends’

Driving Miss Daisy” this ain’t, but a wealthy Hong Kong woman and her mainland Chinese chauffeur do make a small, indefinable connection as they go through their own financial meltdowns in “Bends,” Hong Kong helmer Flora Lau’s observation of China-h.K. relations. Aesthetically, Lau’s debut is beautifully assembled by a top-pedigree production crew, but it remains a modest accomplishment in scope and impact. Although the film radiates festival appeal, its lack of strong dramatic incident will hinder it from making a dent in the domestic market, even with A-list leads Aloys Chen Kun and Carina Lau onboard.

Fai (Chen) is a mainland Chinese immigrant who has obtained Hong Kong citizenship. Due to the intricacies of Hong Kong law, however, his pregnant wife, Tingting (Tian Yuan), has no right of abode; she cannot live with him and is ineligible for healthcare. She and their young daughter, Haihai, shuttle
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Vulgaria (2012) Movie Review #2

Pang Ho Cheung, arguably the most talented writer and director working in Hong Kong today, swaps the gentle wit of his popular “Love in the Puff” and sequel for something considerably ruder in the aptly-titled “Vulgaria”. With Chapman To (“The Bounty”) leading an all-star cast as a producer struggling to get his film made while juggling various personal problems, “Vulgaria” is a hilariously vicious swipe at the Hong Kong industry, which earned a category III rating for its perverse themes and incredibly ripe and creative use of swearing. Local audiences certainly took to its brand of crudeness, the film emerging as one of the year’s biggest domestic hits, also notching up several nominations at the Golden Horse Awards as well as playing to acclaim at numerous international festivals. Chapman To plays film producer To Wai, the film opening with him being interviewed in front of a lecture theatre of
See full article at Beyond Hollywood »

The Allure of Tears (2011) Movie Review

Hong Kong film maker Barbara Wong, known for romantic comedies that tackle modern issues, such as the recent “The Perfect Marriage” and “The Break Up Club”, returns with something a little more bitter than sweet in “The Allure of Tears”. As its title suggests, the film is a tearjerker of the highest order, featuring 3 vaguely connected stories of love and loss, with the emphasis firmly on the latter. Seeing Wong working again with regular writer-producer Lawrence Cheng, the film features a fine cast made up of newcomers and industry veterans, including Richie Jen (“Punished”), Gigi Leung (“Marrying Mr Perfect”), Aarif Lee (“Bruce Lee, My Brother”) and popular television starlet Joe Chen (“You’re My Destiny”), plus Shawn Dou and Zhou Dongyu, stars of Zhang Yimou’s “Under the Hawthorn Tree”. The first of the film’s segments focuses on Zhou Dongyu as Xili Mei, a young woman suffering from leukaemia,
See full article at Beyond Hollywood »

DVD Review: Young Bruce Lee

Young Bruce Lee (aka Bruce Lee, My Brother)

Stars: Aarif Rahman, Tony Leung, Christy Chung | Written by Robert Lee & Manfred Wong | Directed by Raymond Yip & Manfred Wong

“Known as ‘The Little Dragon’ to legions of adoring fans, Bruce Lee is regarded by many as the greatest martial arts legend who ever lived. From his birth on November 27th 1940 to his departure for San Francisco in 1959, discover how Bruce Lee lived through war and persecution and survived the brutal street-gangs of 1950′s Hong Kong before going on to live his dreams.”

Young Bruce Lee is a Hong Kong biopic based on the recollections of Bruce Lee’s siblings, mainly the first-hand experiences of his younger brother Robert Lee, author of the book “Bruce Lee: My Brother”. From the opening credits you can tell this film has high production values, and why not, it’s an incredible look at the world
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Hong Kong Film Awards 2011: Winners: Gallants, Confucius, IP Man 2

Gallants, Confucius, Ip Man 2, and the other winners of the 2011 Hong Kong Film Awards have been announced. The 30th Annual Hong Kong Film Awards, “founded in 1982, are the most prestigious film awards in Hong Kong and among the most respected in mainland China and Taiwan. Award ceremonies are held annually, typically in April. The Awards recognize achievement in all aspects of filmmaking, such as directing, screenwriting, acting and cinematography. The awards are the Hong Kong equivalent to the American Oscars and the British Baftas.” The awards were handed out on April 17, 2011 at the Hong Kong Cultural Center. “The ceremony was hosted by Teresa Mo, Vincent Kuk, and Lawrence Cheng.” The full listing of the 2011 Hong Kong Film Award winners is below.

Best Film

(Gallants), produced by Lam Ka Tung

Best Director

Tsui Hark, (Detective Dee And The Mystery Of The Phantom Flame)

Best Screenplay

Pang Ho Cheung & Heiward Mak, (Love
See full article at Film-Book »

Break Up Club (2010) Movie Review

Barbara Wong, noted director of hip modern Hong Kong youth films returns with “Break Up Club”, teaming again with writer producer Lawrence Cheng, who she worked with back in 2003 on her first hit “Truth or Dare: 6th Floor Rear Flat”. For her latest feature, she returns to the same low key, documentary like style, using handheld cameras and a variety of techniques to chart the ups and downs of the turbulent relationship between a young, possibly mismatched couple. The film has an extra bit of spice due to the presence of rumoured real life pairing Fiona Sit and Jaycee Chan in the lead roles, who previously also played screen lovers in “2 Young”. It certainly managed to strike a chord with audiences, emerging as one of the biggest domestic box office hits of summer 2010. Jaycee Chan plays Joe, a twenty-something layabout whose lack of commitment in finding a job or
See full article at Beyond Hollywood »

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