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1-20 of 39 items from 2012   « Prev | Next »


Television in The Criterion Collection

20 December 2012 7:00 AM, PST | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

The Criterion Collection devotes itself to important classic and contemporary films. But cinema hardly exists in a vacuum. Moving image artists have often moved between media formats, and movies have had a history of influence from their many competitors. Would we have seen Nicholas Ray’s Bigger Than Life, for example, in widescreen Technicolor had 1950s cinema not competed with television? Therefore, even though The Criterion Collection is overwhelmingly devoted to the art of cinema, the Collection has recognized select important works of television. But the inevitable question arises: which works of great, influential television are justifiable to include in a cinema library? The Criterion Collection doesn’t include works of television that are great in television’s own terms, but instead recognizes works of television that are great for cinema. American TV The library’s release that’s most explicitly devoted to the medium of television is undoubtedly The Golden Age of Television, a »

- Landon Palmer

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Joshua Brand & John Falsey To Receive WGA Paddy Chayefsky Award For TV

19 December 2012 10:17 AM, PST | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Joshua Brand and John Falsey, who co-created hit TV series including Northern Exposure, St. Elsewhere and I’ll Fly Away, have been awarded the WGA West‘s 2013 Paddy Chayefsky Laurel Award for Television. The honor, the guild’s lifetime achievement award for outstanding television writing, will be bestowed February 17 during the WGA Awards‘ West Coast ceremony at the Jw Marriott Los Angeles L.A. Live. “Writers Joshua Brand and John Falsey’s have left an indelible imprint on the television landscape, co-creating some of TV’s most enduring, memorable series that have both entertained and moved a generation of viewers”, said Wgaw president Christopher Keyser. “Defined by an expert blend of sharp observation, dry wit, and honest emotion, their work is, like a singer with a five-octave range, breathtaking in its scope and its power. Together, Brand and Falsey have created an enviable legacy that both veteran and up-and-coming writers »

- THE DEADLINE TEAM

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Two and a Half Men's young star isn't the first to bite the hand that feeds

29 November 2012 5:36 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Angus T Jones has called his own programme 'filth' – joining a long line of show-sabotaging celebrities

Self-flagellation has become the fashion in broadcasting. Less than a month after the extraordinary Newsnight programme in which the whole show was devoted to apologising for the false Lord McAlpine report and questioning the programme's very right to exist, an American actor went even further – suggesting that the hit sitcom in which he appears may be the work of the devil.

As well as further confirming the difficulties of talent management in an age of social media, Angus T Jones's attack on Two and a Half Men as irreligious filth – for which he has since apologised – has attracted such attention because it breaks a law of product loyalty implicit in the industry and sometimes contractually stipulated.

Broadcasting encourages a form of patriotism, in which staff are expected to wave a flag for their programme. »

- Mark Lawson

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100 + Greatest Horror Movies (pt.3) 100-76

15 October 2012 2:29 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Throughout the month of October, Editor-in-Chief and resident Horror expert Ricky D, will be posting a list of his favorite Horror films of all time. The list will be posted in six parts. Click here to see every entry.

As with all lists, this is personal and nobody will agree with every choice – and if you do, that would be incredibly disturbing. It was almost impossible for me to rank them in order, but I tried and eventually gave up.

****

Special Mention: Gremlins

Directed by Joe Dante

Written by Chris Columbus

1984, USA

Gremlins gets a special mention because I’ve always considered it more of a comedy and a wholesome Christmas flick than an actual horror film. This tribute the 1950s matinee genre stands the test of time from a time when parents would take their children to family films that pushed the boundaries of the MPAA. Joe Dante is »

- Ricky

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'Medal of Honor: Warfighter' Marketing Continues To Be Weird, Enlists Linkin Park

12 October 2012 9:40 AM, PDT | MTV Multiplayer | See recent MTV Multiplayer news »

After announcing last month that maps from the upcoming shooter would be based on the film based on the Hunt for Bin Laden, EA hopping the line between gritty realism and action fantasy with... Linkin Park?

In this Machinima-exclusive video for the track "Castle of Glass," a young boy copes with his father's death while in active service, cut with clips and the band and footage from the Danger Close-developed game.

With the development of Warfighter, EA's been trading on the veracity of the game, from the detail in their weapons to the ripped-from-the-headlines missions. But this feels like a crossed line, a sickly mix of fake pathos, rah rah patriotism, and a little "come buy our game"-ism set to a pumping rock track.

In lieu of the mawkish Churchill quote, and as someone with quite a few veterans and active servicemen in my family, let me let screenwriter »

- Charles Webb

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Rom-Com 'The Big Wedding' Delayed Six Months To April 2013, 'Now You See Me' Moves To June 7th

10 September 2012 2:15 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Good news for awards contenders this year: the field just got a little thinner. Because the potential prestige juggernaut that was "The Big Wedding," an all-star rom-com starring Diane Keaton, Robert De Niro, Susan Sarandon, Katherine Heigl, Amanda Seyfried, Ben Barnes, Robin Williams and Topher Grace, the directorial debut of "The Bucket List" writer Justin Zackham (yes, that Paddy Chayefsky of the 21st century) is no longer a 2012 release, as parent studio Lionsgate have moved it from the so-close-you-can-almost-taste-it date of October 26th, to the far-off distant lands of April 26th, 2013, a date that it has all to itself (although "Iron Man 3" hits a week later), and exactly six months from the original release date. Whether it was to give awards hopefuls like "The Master" a fighting chanch or an attempt to work as early-summer counter programming is unclear, but those of you who were eagerly looking forward to the film are going to. »

- Oliver Lyttelton

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Get Ready for “The Possession” 2? Or “Re-Possession”?

4 September 2012 1:42 PM, PDT | FamousMonsters of Filmland | See recent Famous Monsters of Filmland news »

Following a first place finish at the box office, chatter has already begun on whether The Possession will garner an order for a sequel. This is hardly surprising, at this point. In an interview with MTV, Sam Raimi, the producer of the film, chatted about sequel possibilities:

”There are so many tales of the original Dybbuk box that never made it to the screen in this version. It’s really out there, that thing. People do have so many stories. Ghost House Pictures has gone ahead and purchased the rights to their stories to make into a film so [a sequel is] possible. But I think it will all depend on if Ole Bornedal was interested and if a very meaningful screenplay could be written from the remaining materials…I had read Paddy Chayefsky’s The Tenth Man. It was really scary. That was the only piece I had read about a Dybbuk, »

- Andy Greene

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DVD Playhouse: September 2012

3 September 2012 10:58 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Allen Gardner

Quadrophenia (Criterion) Franc Roddam’s 1979 film based on The Who’s classic rock opera tells the story of working class lad Jimmy (Phil Daniels) struggling to find his identity in a rapidly changing Britain, circa 1965. Jimmy is a “mod,” a youth movement dedicated to wearing snappy suits, driving Vespa motor scooters bedecked with side mirrors, popping amphetamines and obsessed with the new sound of bands like The Who and The Kinks. Their other pastime is engaging in bloody brawls with “rockers,” throwbacks to the 1950s, who listen to Elvis and Gene Vincent, wear leather biker gear, grease in their hair and drive massive motorcycles a la Marlon Brando in “The Wild One.” Often cited as a worthy successor to “Rebel Without a Cause” as the greatest angry youth picture ever made, it is that and more, including a first cousin to the “kitchen sink” dramas of scribes John Osborne, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Is a Re-Possession in Our Future? Sam Raimi Talks Possible Sequel(s) to The Possession

1 September 2012 9:58 PM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

With The Possession winning this weekend's box office, its producer, Sam Raimi, was asked about the possibility of further stories to be told in the universe of the film's antagonistic Dybbuk box, and it seems Ghost House Pictures is ready to proceed if all the right pieces come together.

Chatting with MTV, Raimi said, "There are so many tales of the original Dybbuk box that never made it to the screen in this version. It's really out there, that thing. People do have so many stories. Ghost House Pictures has gone ahead and purchased the rights to their stories to make into a film so [a sequel is] possible. But I think it will all depend on if Ole Bornedal was interested and if a very meaningful screenplay could be written from the remaining materials."

As for why he was interested in the Dybbuk myth in the first place, Raimi explained, "I had »

- The Woman In Black

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Woman in a Dressing Gown – review

28 July 2012 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

I saw this movie for the first and only time crossing the Atlantic in 1957, on the Mauritania, on the way to the States. My fellow English Speaking Union scholars and I, still in the grip of Look Back in Anger and seething from the moral and political debacle of Suez, regarded it with mirthful contempt. It was the kind of stilted, patronising British movie about working-class and lower-middle-class life we were in flight from after we'd just embraced Paddy Chayefsky's Marty, The Catered Affair and The Bachelor Party, and been thrilled by Ealing's Alexander Mackendrick making his American debut with Sweet Smell of Success. It's now being revived, or disinterred, as a major harbinger of British kitchen-sink realism, a term coined in the mid-1950s by my future mentor David Sylvester.

The movie turns upon a lower-middle-class clerk (stiff-upper-lip specialist Anthony Quayle) preparing to leave his loving, depressed, slatternly »

- Philip French

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Andy Griffith and Ernest Borgnine: Remembering each of their greatest performances. One of them may be the most startling Hollywood movie you've never seen

17 July 2012 8:59 PM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Andy Griffith and Ernest Borgnine were early, trend-setting examples of stars who made the transition from movies to television, often (in Borgnine’s case) oscillating between them. And because they both jumped mediums, Griffith and Borgnine, who died within a week of each other (Griffith on July 3, Borgnine on July 8), had fans of every phase of their career who didn’t necessarily overlap. Yet during this last week or so, as I thought back over the many, many decades of pleasure that both these actors had given us, I kept returning to what were, for me, their two greatest performances. »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Remember Me: Ernest Borgnine

11 July 2012 6:36 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

When the drama Marty won the Academy Award for the Best Picture of 1955, it was a win of many wins, and not just because the movie walked off with three other Oscars.

It signaled that the balance of creative power in Hollywood was shifting; that the monopoly of the major studios was fading, and that a new breed of independent companies – often formed with or by the stars who had, at one time, been held in bondage to the majors under long-term contracts – were serious player in the industry (Marty had been produced by Hecht-Lancaster which had been formed by Burt Lancaster and producer Harold Hecht).

It was a victory for a new kind of anti-Hollywood storytelling; unglamorous tales about unglamorous people, real people.  Postwar Italian neo-realism had demonstrated the power of the drama of everyday people just trying to get through a day, and Marty and other films like »

- Bill Mesce

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Blu-ray Review: Warner Bros. Releases Great Wave of Action, Sci-fi Flicks

11 July 2012 3:34 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Warner Brothers likes to pull handfuls of titles out of their immensely deep catalog and they’ve come back with a unique, interesting wave of releases at low prices to spice up your Summer this year. The films have little in common (although several could be classified as sci-fi) and vary wildly in quality but all are likely to have a fan or two out there wondering why they haven’t been released on Blu-ray. Now they have.

Altered States

Photo credit: Warner Bros.

Altered States

Rating: 4.0/5.0

Director Ken Russell passed away last year leaving critics and movie lovers to continue to debate his unique style and best pictures. Personally, I’ve always been a fan of his 1980 adaptation of the legendary Paddy Chayefsky novel “Altered States,” featuring one of William Hurt’s most fearless and interesting performances. It’s both classic Russell in its unique style and a »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Blu-ray Review: Flawed Satire ‘God Bless America’ Has Moments of Brilliance

11 July 2012 6:25 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – How does one attempt to review a picture that has a 5-star opening act, a 2-star finale and several flashes of brilliance amidst a middling midsection? Are the good parts worth savoring despite the overarching flaws? In the case of Bobcat Goldthwait’s scathing yet softhearted satire on American idiocy, the answer is a resounding yes..

God Bless America” is not as uproarious as Goldthwait’s 2006 effort, “Sleeping Dogs Lie,” nor as poignant as his 2009 Robin Williams vehicle, “World’s Greatest Dad,” but as a disgruntled liberal’s wet dream, the film is impossible to resist—at least during its first half-hour. What nearly holds the film together is the endearingly droll work from leading man Joel Murray (brother of Bill), who could easily attain cult status for this role.

Blu-ray Rating: 3.5/5.0

One of the criticisms routinely launched at this film is that it falls far short of its obvious cinematic inspiration, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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New on DVD and Blu-ray: 'American Reunion' and More

9 July 2012 12:00 PM, PDT | NextMovie | See recent NextMovie news »

This week: Stifler and the rest of his East Great Falls gang reunite for a wild weekend of MILFs and memories in "American Reunion," the third and final sequel in the theatrical "American Pie" comedy franchise.

Also new this week is a return to form for Robert De Niro in "Being Flynn," Anna Paquin in the long-delayed "Margaret," plus the Blu-ray debuts of "Altered States" and "Chariots of Fire."

'American Reunion'

Box Office: $57 million

Rotten Tomatoes: 43% Rotten

Storyline: The gang of East Great Falls reunites in this fourth and final theatrical "American Pie" movie. Twelve years after graduating from high school, Jim (Jason Biggs) and Michelle (Alyson Hannigan) have gotten married, Oz (Chris Klein) is an NFL sportscaster that grew apart from Heather (Mena Suvari), Kevin (Thomas Ian Nicholas) and Vicky (Tara Reid) have split, while Stifler (Seann William Scott) continues to suffer from prolonged arrested development. Meanwhile, »

- Robert DeSalvo

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Ernest Borgnine obituary

9 July 2012 10:05 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Stocky supporting actor who won an Oscar when he was cast against type as a lonely butcher in Marty

With his coarsely podgy features, bug eyes, gap-toothed grin and stocky build, Ernest Borgnine, who has died aged 95 of renal failure, seemed destined to remain one of nature's supporting actors in a string of sadistic and menacing parts. Instead he won an Oscar for a role which was the antithesis of all his previous characters.

In 1955, the producer Harold Hecht wanted to transfer Paddy Chayefsky's teleplay Marty to the big screen, with Rod Steiger in the title role, which he had created. But Steiger was filming Oklahoma! so was unavailable. Borgnine was offered the role after a female guest at a Hollywood reception quite disinterestedly remarked to Hecht that, ugly as he was, Borgnine possessed an oddly tender quality which made her yearn to mother him. "That," Hecht said later, »

- Ronald Bergan

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Ernest Borgnine obituary

9 July 2012 10:05 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Stocky supporting actor who won an Oscar when he was cast against type as a lonely butcher in Marty

With his coarsely podgy features, bug eyes, gap-toothed grin and stocky build, Ernest Borgnine, who has died aged 95 of renal failure, seemed destined to remain one of nature's supporting actors in a string of sadistic and menacing parts. Instead he won an Oscar for a role which was the antithesis of all his previous characters.

In 1955, the producer Harold Hecht wanted to transfer Paddy Chayefsky's teleplay Marty to the big screen, with Rod Steiger in the title role, which he had created. But Steiger was filming Oklahoma! so was unavailable. Borgnine was offered the role after a female guest at a Hollywood reception quite disinterestedly remarked to Hecht that, ugly as he was, Borgnine possessed an oddly tender quality which made her yearn to mother him. "That," Hecht said later, »

- Ronald Bergan

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Oscar Winner Ernest Borgnine Passes Away at 95

9 July 2012 5:15 AM, PDT | TooFab | See recent TooFab news »

Los Angeles (AP) -- He was a tubby tough guy with a pug of a mug, as unlikely a big-screen star or a romantic lead as could be imagined.Yet Ernest Borgnine won a woman's love and an Academy Award in one of the great lonelyhearts roles in "Marty," a highlight in a workhorse career that spanned nearly seven decades and more than 200 film and television parts.Borgnine, who died Sunday at 95, worked to the end. One of his final roles was a bit part as a CIA records-keeper in 2010's action comedy "Red" -- fittingly for his age, a story of retired spies who show that it's never too late to remain in the game when they're pulled back into action."I keep telling myself, `Damn it, you gotta go to work,"' Borgnine said in a 2007 interview with The Associated Press. "But there aren't many people who want »

- tooFab Staff

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Ernest Borgnine: 1917-2012

8 July 2012 3:13 PM, PDT | IMDb News

Ernest Borgnine, the rugged, stocky actor with a brassy voice and the face of the local butcher, died today in Los Angeles at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of renal failure. He was 95.

Borgnine was known for playing characters both brutal and gentle. On the brutal side was the cruel Sgt. "Fatso" Judson in From Here to Eternity, Coley Trimble, the right-hand goon in Bad Day at Black Rock, Dutch Engstrom, in the enduring classic The Wild Bunch and Shack, the train bull after Lee Marvin in Emperor of the North. On the gentle side he was known as the love-lorn Marty in the 1955 film of the same name (for which he earned an Oscar for Best Actor), Lt. Commander Quinton McHale from "McHale's Navy," Rogo, the cop with the prostitute-wife in The Poseidon Adventure and, to a whole new generation, as the voice of the starfish-donning, geriatric Mermaid Man on "SpongeBob SquarePants."

A first generation American Ernest Borgnine was born Ermes Effron Borgnino on January 24, 1917, in Hamden, Connecticut. His father was Camillo (later Charles) Borgnino of Ottiglio, in northern Italy and his mother was Anna Bosselli, from Capri, Italy.

Borgnine showed no real interest in acting until well after a ten-year stint in the Navy. He was 32 when his mother suggested that he become an actor, observing "you like to make a fool of yourself in front of other people" so Ernie enrolled in the Randall School of Drama in Hartford and then moved to Abingdon, Virginia for Robert Porterfield's famous Barter Theatre.

Times were lean for Borgnine. He had married for the first time and moved from the Barter to New York, quickly getting noticed for his role as a male nurse in a Broadway production of "Harvey" but he soon moved back to the Barter school again. He then returned to New York but the nascent medium of television, not the stage, sustained him for a while. Borgnine prided himself on not being picky. His original TV work included a stint in the action serial "Captain Video and His Video Rangers." He was noticed by Delbert Mann, himself a budding director, who encouraged Borgnine and gave him small roles.

Borgnine's true break came when he moved to Los Angeles and landed the role of Sergeant "Fatso" Judson in Eternity, a smash hit that, in addition to launching Borgnine's helped reinvigorate numerous careers including Frank Sinatra's and Deborah Kerr's. He played the bad guy again, though one of the goons this time, in Johnny Guitar. Borgnine then parlayed his new-found notoriety with the lead in a screenplay written by Paddy Chayefsky, that of Marty, in the film of the same name, slated to be directed by his mentor, Delbert Mann. The story was about an underdog named Marty, a self-avowed ugly man, who has to evolve beyond his dedication to his overbearing mother and his bonds with his best friend, when he falls in love with Clara, a woman who is also unpopular and unattractive, played by Betsy Blair.

Marty was a surprise hit, was nominated for eight Oscars (including Best Picture and Best Director for Mann) and won four, including Borgnine's unexpected win over a very crowded field which included his co-star in Bad Day at Black Rock,Spencer Tracy, and a posthumous nod to James Dean (who had died the previous September in a car crash) for his role in East of Eden.

The Oscar helped keep the actor in the game and the next seven years included a mix of TV and film work including A Catered Affair, Jubal, The Vikings and various "Playhouse" appearances on the small screen.

1962 brought "McHale's Navy," with Borgnine assaying the role of Lt. Commander Quinton McHale, the put-upon chief of PT boat 73. The cast included Joe Flynn and Tim Conway (Conway would, 35 years later, team up again with Borgnine as the voice of Mermaid Man's sidekick, Barnacle Boy, on "SpongeBob SquarePants"). "McHale's" had a healthy following for four years.

Borgnine had a mid-life Renaissance in the late '60s and early '70s. He played a small but pivotal role in The Dirty Dozen, was Boris Vaslov in Ice Station Zebra and was Dutch Engstrom, the taciturn but decisive bandit throwing in with Sam Peckinpah's Wild Bunch. He also joined the capsized cast of The Poseidon Adventure, played Shack, the train bull in The Emperor of the North Pole and was the simple-minded but helpful Cabbie in Escape from New York.

Borgnine was married five times. His second marriage was to the fiery actress Katy Jurado. It began in 1959 but was over four years later. Reports differ on when he met his third wife, Ethel Merman. She claimed it was in November of 1963, the same month that he was finalizing his divorce to Jurado. He insisted it wasn't until the next spring. Regardless they were married on June 24th, the following year. It lasted less than a month. In her autobiography entitled "Merman," the actress intimated that Borgnine was abusive stating, "I just feel lucky to have been able to 'walk' away from the marriage." She devoted an entire chapter to their union, entitled "My Marriage to Ernest Borgnine"--it consisted of one blank page.

His last marriage, to Tova Traesnaes, lasted over 35 years and until his death. Borgnine had four children: Gina Kemins-Borgnine, the child from his first marriage to Rhoda Kemins, and three from his fourth wife, Donna Rancourt, named Diana Rancourt-Borgnine (born December 29th 1970), Sharon (born 1965) and Cristofer (born 1969). Oddly, in his autobiography, "Ernie" Bornine only acknowledged the first three children, dropping Diana out entirely. »

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Remember Me: Andy Griffith (1926 – 2012) – The Yokel As Shrewdie

7 July 2012 8:20 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Andy Griffith was understandably defined by his most popular role: Sheriff Andy Taylor on the early 1960s series, The Andy Griffith Show.

Because of that, it sometimes seemed, in the years after – at least to those of us who’d grown up watching Sheriff Andy — Griffith was working awfully hard to show there was more to him than the genial, sage, small-town sheriff on what was easily one of the gentlest and most sweet-natured (without being saccharine) shows in TV history. I remember his racist murderer in the true crime-inspired Murder in Coweta County (1983), still defiant and unapologetic as he’s being strapped into an electric chair for execution; his caustic, hard-drinking, and ultimately thieving Hollywood cowboy extra in the overlooked cult favorite, Hearts of the West (1975); his neo-fascist general in the 1979 TV mini-series redo of From Here to Eternity.

This was, in fact, the reason he’d left Andy Griffith »

- Bill Mesce

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1-20 of 39 items from 2012   « Prev | Next »


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