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1-20 of 30 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


12 Worst TV Shows of All Time

26 September 2016 7:30 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Too much quality TV got you down? All that art and introspection making you pine for the long-gone age of junk? Here’s a companion to our list of the 100 Greatest TV Shows of All Time – a few of our picks for the worst. Remember: For every bad show that claws its way to the airwaves, there are hundreds of even worse ones that never made it that far. Respect!

Duck Dynasty

2012-present

Congratulations, Robertson family – you are officially the worst anything ever! A dipshit sitcom passed off as a reality show, »

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Watch 'Sopranos' Actors Remember James Gandolfini

23 September 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

There was TV before The Sopranos, and there was TV after The Sopranos. David Chase's Mafia saga kicked off the current Golden Age of TV, put HBO on the map, and made a star out of a bearlike character actor named James Gandolfini with a role most actors would strangle a degenerate gambler to get. (Not for nothing did our TV critic Rob Sheffield name it the single greatest TV show of all time in our current cover story.) In a new video interview exclusive to Rolling Stone, two »

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‘Gomorrah’ Review: Italian Drama is a Darker, Grown-Up Version of ‘The Sopranos’

24 August 2016 2:54 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Gomorrah,” an Italian crime series imported by SundanceTV after finding much success overseas, is largely set at night. That darkness may be the first — and possibly most significant — change that fans of the 2008 film notice.

Matteo Garrone’s original feature used light to boldly depict the violence overwhelming his home country. But the series from Leonardo Fasoli, Giovanni Bianconi, Stefano Bises, Ludovica Rampoldi and Roberto Saviano (yes, they’re all credited as creators) uses shadows to its advantage, providing stark contrast between the hidden lifestyle of a mafia family and the stark realities of its results.

It’s not the only change from the Cannes Grand Jury Prize winner, but the shift affects more than just the challenge of watching in daylight. The serialized take on “Gomorrah” — which has aired two seasons already in Italy, with two more on the way — feels like a much more straightforward crime story; one »

- Ben Travers

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‘Gomorrah’ Review: Italian Drama is a Darker, Grown-Up Version of ‘The Sopranos’

24 August 2016 2:54 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Gomorrah,” an Italian crime series imported by SundanceTV after finding much success overseas, is largely set at night. That darkness may be the first — and possibly most significant — change that fans of the 2008 film notice.

Matteo Garrone’s original feature used light to boldly depict the violence overwhelming his home country. But the series from Leonardo Fasoli, Giovanni Bianconi, Stefano Bises, Ludovica Rampoldi and Roberto Saviano (yes, they’re all credited as creators) uses shadows to its advantage, providing stark contrast between the hidden lifestyle of a mafia family and the stark realities of its results.

It’s not the only change from the Cannes Grand Jury Prize winner, but the shift affects more than just the challenge of watching in daylight. The serialized take on “Gomorrah” — which has aired two seasons already in Italy, with two more on the way — feels like a much more straightforward crime story; one »

- Ben Travers

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Mr Robot recap: season two, episode six – laughter tracks and panic attacks

12 August 2016 4:56 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

By creating a vivid fantasy of a 90s sitcom for this week’s episode, showrunner Sam Esmail is pitching himself alongside Vince Gilligan and David Chase

Sam Esmail is the eminence gris behind Mr Robot. Though the word “behind” undersells it. He’s more the man right in the middle: producing, directing and writing the show. That he has been able to create suspense and relatable characters at the same time as immersing his audience into the technical murk of hacking has delivered kudos enough. But now, with this week’s episode, Esmail is taking the mickey. Not content with creating a complex drama, he’s knocked off a note-perfect pastiche of one of those sunny 90s sitcoms. And played it for shivers.

Related: UnREAL, Mr Robot, True Detective: why great shows have bad second seasons

Related: Mr Robot recap: season two, episode five – big trouble in China

Continue reading. »

- Paul MacInnes

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Andrew Haigh’s ‘Lean on Pete’ Finds Its Lead in Charlie Plummer

11 July 2016 10:14 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Now that the “Looking” movie has premiered at Outfest and is set to play on HBO later this month, Andrew Haigh is moving on to his next endeavor: an adaptation of Willy Vlautin’s novel “Lean on Pete.” The project, apparently one that the filmmaker has long desired to make, has just found its lead in Charlie Plummer. The young actor will play Charley Thompson, a wayward teenager whose mother abandoned him as a newborn and whose father has just died.

Read More: Steve Buscemi Joins Andrew Haigh’s Passion Project ‘Lean On Pete

Deadline first announced the casting, which puts Plummer alongside Steve Buscemi as Del and a to-be-announced horse as the film’s namesake/Charley’s traveling companion as he sets out in search of an estranged family member. Plummer was most recently seen in this summer’s “King Jack” and also appeared in David Chase’s “Not Fade Away. »

- Michael Nordine

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The 20 Best TV Dramas of the Last 20 Years

16 June 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Like it or not, TV dramas often set the standard for how television eras are remembered. Be it awards attention or Top 10 lists, dramas are looked to as a guide post for where we are, where we’re headed and what’s worth revisiting from the past. Series like “The Americans” and “Mad Men” look back to break down where we are now, while iconic moments in time are captured in series “of the now” like “The Wire” and “The O.C.” Eras matter, in your life and in all our lives, and these 20 series, all premiering in the last 20 years, have defined the past two decades in every aspect imaginable.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer” (1997-2003)

Joss Whedon may have traded the supernatural for superheroes in recent years, but his first series remains his crowning achievement as King of the Nerds. “Buffy” was strong as a whole, with a well-rounded cast, top-notch writing, and a healthy dose of classic Whedon humor, but it’s in examining the series’ most famous episodes that the true genius shines through. Three “Buffy” episodes are widely regarded as some of the best in TV history: the eerily silent “Hush,” featuring only 14 minutes of dialogue and the scariest villains in the entire show; the genuinely catchy musical numbers of “Once More With Feeling,” which combined Buffy’s existential crisis with a musical-inducing demon; and “The Body,” a study in overwhelming grief as Buffy and her friends deal with the death of her mother. While “Buffy” may not be as critically acclaimed as other shows on this list, it redefined the supernatural genre, paving the way for countless other shows — none of which have lived up to to the original vampiric cult favorite. – Kate Halliwell

“Oz” (1997-2003)

Given how much attention is given to early HBO dramas “The Sopranos” and “The Wire,” it’s almost criminal just how overlooked “Oz” has become. Critics adore it, but you’ll be hard-pressed to find any “Game Of Thrones” or “Breaking Bad” fans who have seen a single episode. Ironically, “Oz” paved the way for nearly every Golden Age TV drama in its path. So much of what we’ve come to expect from TV drama — antiheroes, brutal violence, moral ambiguities, the fearless disposal of main characters — was born at the Oswald State Correctional Facility, where racial, sexual, and economic conflicts within the prison system gave way to some of the most complex characters TV has ever seen. Each episode, co-written by creator Tom Fontana, dynamically weaves a single theme through both the present storyline and flashbacks revealing inmates’ unspeakable crimes, all narrated by Harold Perrineau Jr.’s Augustus Hill with a lyrical slam pulse. “Orange Is The New Black” has used this format in recent years to create its own memorable world, but it could only dream of hitting as viscerally as “Oz.” At times brutally grounded and surreally poetic, the show uses its fictional environment as a microcosm for our society at large, showing how the divides and conflicts manifested in prison first start in the neighborhoods we live in. “Oz” has a burdensome power that you have to reckon with. – Zack Shark

Queer as Folk” (UK) (1999-2000)

With this intimate look at gay life in Manchester, England, creator Russell T. Davies brought joy, wit and pathos to the stories of Stuart (Aiden Gillen), Vince (Craig Kelly) and Nathan (Charlie Hunnam) as they struggled to find love in the city’s vibrant club scene. Balancing “Doctor Who” references with surprisingly explicit love scenes (yeah, look at that cast list again — some of the show’s hottest sex features “Game of Thrones'” Littlefinger and baby Jax Teller from “Sons of Anarchy), the original “Queer as Folk” was groundbreaking for British television and even game-changing for the U.S., when Showtime created an American adaptation that ran from 2000-2005. While short-lived in comparison to the remake, the original version remains singular and iconic. – Liz Shannon Miller

The West Wing” (1999-2006)

Here’s the pitch: A young, close knit group of Presidential staffers fight the good fight, with episodes centering around wonky debates over sexy topics like the census, foreign aid, and nuclear energy. Hard to believe, but it was a formula that that led Aaron Sorkin’s NBC drama to capture an audience of over 20 million weekly viewers and four consecutive Emmys for Outstanding Drama Series. Mixing the hard realities of modern politics and Sorkin’s romantic belief that a dedicated group of passionate people can bring about positive change, the show was equal parts entertaining and educational. Predictably, the show teetered after its fourth season, when Sorkin and his playful dialogue moved on, but under the leadership of showrunner John Wells the “West Wing” successfully reinvented itself with longer, more sober story arcs centered around characters’ existential/career crises and an oddly prescient election to replace President Jed Bartlet (Martin Sheen), which predicted so many real-life political stories, including the 2008 match-up between Senators Obama and McCain. – Chris O’Falt

Read More: ‘The West Wing’ Reunion: Aaron Sorkin and Cast Remember How the Internet Saved the Series

The Sopranos” (1999-2007)

The greatness of “The Sopranos” cannot be overstated. Its lavish praise will never be hyperbolic. HBO, for all its excellent offerings, will never do anything better. David Chase’s six-season mob drama is equal parts American opus and Shakespearean drama, one that encompasses the grand spectrum of human emotion and experience (especially as it applies to strip club-loving tough guys) through the tight lens of what could be a slightly alienating focus. Mobsters have long entertained American audiences, but to distill the crime drama down to a series that is just as concerned with domestic troubles as it is with Mafia-related violence is bold indeed. Or, in other words: It’s just really, really good (and super entertaining). “The Sopranos” never shied away from its roots as a show about the mob, but it also fully embraced the kind suburban ennui that made Tony Soprano — a larger than life character — feel oddly relatable and often even kind of lovable. While Chase’s series is hardly in danger of being forgotten or maligned, its divisive final shot is often the subject of close reads that forget to acknowledge the kind of subtlety and power that ran through the entire series. It’s not just Tony’s last meal (maybe) that deserves a deep dive. It’s the entire series. – Kate Erbland

Related stories'The West Wing' Reunion: Aaron Sorkin and Cast Remember How the Internet Saved the Series'Friday Night Lights' Reunion: Connie Britton Thrills Fans & More Cast Highlights From Atx TV FestEven Indie Directors Who Make Great TV Can't Get Female-Driven Films Made (Consider This) »

- Ben Travers, Liz Shannon Miller, Kate Erbland, Michael Schneider, Zack Sharf, Chris O'Falt, David Ehrlich, Russell Goldman and Kate Halliwell

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The 20 Best TV Dramas of the Last 20 Years

16 June 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Like it or not, TV dramas often set the standard for how television eras are remembered. Be it awards attention or Top 10 lists, dramas are looked to as a guide post for where we are, where we’re headed and what’s worth revisiting from the past. Series like “The Americans” and “Mad Men” look back to break down where we are now, while iconic moments in time are captured in series “of the now” like “The Wire” and “The O.C.” Eras matter, in your life and in all our lives, and these 20 series, all premiering in the last 20 years, have defined the past two decades in every aspect imaginable.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer” (1997-2003)

Joss Whedon may have traded the supernatural for superheroes in recent years, but his first series remains his crowning achievement as King of the Nerds. “Buffy” was strong as a whole, with a well-rounded cast, »

- Ben Travers, Liz Shannon Miller, Kate Erbland, Michael Schneider, Zack Sharf, Chris O'Falt, David Ehrlich, Russell Goldman and Kate Halliwell

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Louis C.K., Damon Lindelof, Peter Gould Talk TV’s New Era of Dark Drama

6 June 2016 12:59 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Darkness has been a core facet of storytelling in television’s prestige dramas since long before even “Hill Street Blues” premiered in 1981, but today’s television leans into the darkness in ways ’80s audiences never would’ve imagined.

From the graphic violence and rape in Westeros on HBO’s “Game of Thrones” to the constant (and frequently unsuccessful) battle to survive on AMC’s “The Walking Dead,” TV’s biggest hits are more brutal than ever. And even a series as heavily comedic as Netflix’s “Orange Is the New Black” is classified as a drama by the TV Academy surely due in no small part to the way it touches on harsh realities in America’s prison system.

Talk to some of today’s top showrunners and you’ll hear why it seems that today’s dramas are darker than ever before. Hint: the emergence of digital outlets to »

- Brandon Shaw

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The Sopranos: David Chase Still Gets "Choked Up" Over the Last Episode

23 May 2016 7:40 PM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

Sopranos creator, David Chase, still gets all choked up just thinking about the end of his long-running HBO series, starring the late James Gandolfini, pictured above with Edie Falco.

The Sopranos controversial TV series finale, "Made in America," first aired on June 10, 2007. Gandolfini passed away on June 19, 2013, in Italy. Speaking at Vulture Fest, Chase said, "I’ll tell you this about it. I’m filled with sadness when I see that ending. I get all choked up — just thinking about it, I get all choked up."

Read More… »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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The Sopranos Creator David Chase Admits the Finale Still Chokes Him Up and Praises Star James Gandolfini: 'He Just Laid Himself Bare'

23 May 2016 10:30 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

A version of this article originally appeared on EW.com."David Chase has some strong feelings about the ending of The Sopranos. Speaking at Vulture Fest on Sunday in New York, Chase revealed he gets "choked up" thinking about the show's denouement. "It's always been this way for me," Chase said of the final moments. "I'm filled with sadness when I see that ending. I get all choked up - just thinking about it, I get all choked up. That's the dominant emotion I have." According to the Sopranos creator, 70, that reaction comes from the way the scene is put »

- CHRISTOPHER ROSEN, @CHRISJROSEN

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'The Sopranos' Ending Still Makes Creator David Chase "Want to Cry"

22 May 2016 7:49 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

David Chase won’t explain the controversial end of The Sopranos, but after nine years since the HBO series went to black, the finale still makes the show’s creator sad. “I’ll tell you this about it,” Chase said, responding to an audience question at Vulture Fest in New York City on Sunday night. “I’m filled with sadness when I see that ending. I get all choked up — just thinking about it, I get all choked up.” And Chase was quick to clarify what he meant: “The way the thing builds and the music, to me, it gets me; it

read more

»

- Suzy Evans

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Paramedic Who Treated James Gandolfini Allegedly Stole Actor's Watch

18 May 2016 | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

A paramedic who treated James Gandolfini in Rome shortly before his death is on trial for allegedly stealing from the actor. According to NBC News, Claudio Bevilacqua, who was one of the attending paramedics when the actor suffered a fatal heart attack in 2013, is being accused of swiping the Sopranos star's Rolex Submariner, which is worth $3,000. Bevilacqua, 43, went on trial on Monday, but the judge decided to push the start of the trial back to November. It has not been confirmed if the watch taken from Gandolfini's hotel room or if it was still on his wrist we he collapsed, »

- Naja Rayne, @najarayne

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Paramedic Who Treated James Gandolfini Allegedly Stole Actor's Watch

18 May 2016 | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

A paramedic who treated James Gandolfini in Rome shortly before his death is on trial for allegedly stealing from the actor. According to NBC News, Claudio Bevilacqua, who was one of the attending paramedics when the actor suffered a fatal heart attack in 2013, is being accused of swiping the Sopranos star's Rolex Submariner, which is worth $3,000. Bevilacqua, 43, went on trial on Monday, but the judge decided to push the start of the trial back to November. It has not been confirmed if the watch taken from Gandolfini's hotel room or if it was still on his wrist we he collapsed, »

- Naja Rayne, @najarayne

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Watch: Supercut Of The First & Final Scenes Of Iconic TV Shows

5 May 2016 2:37 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

David Chase has had to explain the ending of “The Sopranos” far too many times, but a common theory posited among fans is that the show’s opening sequence – in which New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano suffers a panic attack and faints after witnessing a family of ducks congregating in his backyard pool – […]

The post Watch: Supercut Of The First & Final Scenes Of Iconic TV Shows appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Nicholas Laskin

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Watch: 90-Minute Career Spanning Talk With 'The Sopranos' Creator David Chase

26 April 2016 1:26 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

With TV shows more often finding their way into the lineups of various film festivals, it's only fitting that the medium should have its own major event. The Series Mania festival in Paris aims to do just that, hoping to do for television, what the Cannes Film Festival does for movies. And in their seventh year, they landed some big gets, including the world premiere of AMC's upcoming "Feed The Beast," a work-in-progress screening of Netflix's "Marseilles," and much more. Organizers also landed "The Sopranos" creator David Chase to sit on the jury, and he also participated in a career spanning talk. Read More: 'The Sopranos' Creator David Chase Talks The Changing Creative Culture At HBO And for fans, it's a treat, as Chase discusses his life making television and movies, and is quite candid about his experiences. He shares that HBO initially wanted him to make a »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Series Mania: Argentine Drama ‘El Marginal’ Wins Grand Prix

25 April 2016 12:37 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Paris — Perched high up in his towering armchair, the excitable Seriesmaniac – Series Mania’s new festival trophy, as created by Parisian design studio Hartland Villa – certainly seemed to have his extremely wide eyes on shows from all over the globe.

Voted for by an eclectic jury led by “The Sopranos” showrunner David Chase and comprising Israeli actress Yaël Abecassis, Anglo-Irish-French actress Amira Casar, British screenwriter Tony Grisoni and French screenwriter Fanny Herrero, Series Mania’s top Grand Prix went to gritty crime series “El Marginal” from Argentina, created by Sebastian Ortega and produced by Underground Producciones, in which an ex-cop goes undercover at a California jail to infiltrate a gang that was responsible for the kidnapping of the daughter of a senior judge.

“El Marginal’s” top Series Mania adds to the statute trove of Underground, the company behind some of Telefe’s biggest critical and ratings hits, such as »

- Damon Wise and John Hopewell

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Can 'Vinyl' be fixed after such a disappointing first season?

17 April 2016 7:00 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

The year's still young, but it's safe to call HBO's Vinyl one of its biggest TV disappointments. Whether you're looking at ratings (where viewership for the initial Sunday night airing keeps coming in at well under 1 million), reviews (my lukewarm initial appraisal was kinder than many), or buzz, the show hasn't remotely been what either viewers or HBO executives might have hoped for from the team-up of Martin Scorsese, Mick Jagger, and Terence Winter, who was fired as showrunner after this season wrapped. (He'll be replaced by The informant! and Bourne Ultimatum writer Scott Z. Burns, in his first real TV job.) For HBO to take such an aggressive move with Winter, who created Boardwalk Empire and was David Chase's top lieutenant for virtually all of The Sopranos, speaks both to a tenuous moment for the pay cable giant — which hasn't been able to turn a drama other than »

- Alan Sepinwall

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Series Mania: David Chase – ‘The Sopranos’ Was a Middle Finger at the TV Establishment’

17 April 2016 6:19 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Paris — The head of the jury at the 7th Series Mania, “The Sopranos” showrunner David Chase took to the stage for an extended interview, reflecting on a long and varied career that very nearly took some very different turns. Beginning with his childhood in New Jersey, he revealed that his youth was vital to his later career as a writer, but not for the reasons many expected. “We were one of the last families to get a television set,” he said. “My father didn’t want to do it. He thought I would spend all my time watching television. Which is what I did do once we got the television. He said he was going to put a lock on it, and he never did do that. But I did watch quite a bit on it.”

Describing post-war New Jersey as “sauvage,” painting a picture of an outgoing, outdoorsy child, »

- Damon Wise

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Series Mania: 10 Highlights or Trends to Track

16 April 2016 12:24 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

10 highlights, or trends, at this year’s 7th Series Mania, which kicked off Friday in Paris:

1.The Cup Runneth Over

From the U.S., David Chase, Cuba Gooding Jr. Harlan Coben, Frank Spotnitz and “Dexter” showrunner Clyde Phillips attend the Paris TV fest. Series Mania also showcases a clutch of Variety’s best-reviewed U.S. series of the year: “Mr. Robot,” “The Man in the High Castle,” “The People v. O.J. Simpson,” and “American Crime,” Season 2, which proves that Season One, Variety wrote, was no one-trick pony. One hell of a U.S. TV fix.

2.The Shape Of Things To Come: ‘Midnight Sun’

“Midnight Sun,” unveiling in world premiere its two first episodes at Series Mania April 19. A high-end crime thriller backed by Canal Plus and Sweden’s Svt packing a singular setting, high-concept – Sami ritual killings in Arctic Circle Sweden – and a high-end budget. After Vivendi’s purchase of Mediaset Premium, »

- John Hopewell and Damon Wise

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 30 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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