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Emma Caulfield Ford Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trivia (14) | Personal Quotes (12)

Overview (3)

Born in San Diego, California, USA
Birth NameEmma Chukker
Height 5' 3½" (1.61 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Born and raised in San Diego, Emma Caulfield began studying drama in at the La Jolla Playhouse and the Old Globe Theatre where she won the distinguished honor of "Excellence in Theatre Arts." She picked up her drama studies once again at The American School in Switzerland (TASIS) in London, all before finishing high school.

Emma is an award winning actress known for her starring role as the young and beautiful demon-turned-mortal, "Anya" on the hit series Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997) starting in 1999. Caulfield's role originally started out as a guest, demon-of-the-week, appearance in a December 1998 episode. She was called back for a few more guest spots for plot reasons, which is when Joss Whedon, the creator of Buffy, realized her talent. She appeared in most of the episodes the following season, and after that, was promoted to a full time series regular. Caulfield's humor and levity was a favorite among critics and added a comedic dimension to the show, which made its final bow in May 2003.

Emma has starred in numerous films including the hit indi sci-fi/rom-com film Timer(2010), starring alongside Michelle Borth, John Patrick Amedori and Desmond Harrington. Emma plays the films central character Oona Leary, a woman on the verge of 30th birthday who trusts that an implanted timer devise will tell her the exact moment she will meet her true love. Emma also starred in the ensemble indi film, The Telling of the Shoes, playing a woman named Alex who is a quietly suffering wife of a man with a deep secret. The film is set for a 2012 release. She also won praise for the highly decorated short film Hollow(2007), where she picked up a best actress award at the Beverly Hills Short Film Festival, playing a neglectful mother named Sarah. She also starred as "Caitlin Green" in the Revolution Studios thriller, Darkness Falls (2003), which opened as the number one film at the box office. Caulfield starred alongside newcomer Chaney Kley as a young woman attempting to take care of her troubled 8-year old brother who is plagued by night terrors. Left to her own resources, Caitlin must tackle the legendary evil that haunts their small town in the dark.

Emma spent 2010 juggling two shows, Gigantic(2010) and Life Unexpected(2009), in heavily recurring arcs. Emma is also a writer and producer. In August of 2009, Emma and her writing partner Camilla Ransten launched the successful web comic Contropussy. A decidedly female driven satire that showcases human behavior through the eyes of animals. That web comic was acquired by IDW, to be published as a book and will be in stores in 2011. She is also the co-creator, executive producer and star of the hit web-series Bandwagon. In it's second season she stars opposite Tracie Thoms, Yvette Nichole Brown and Paul Adelstein, as "Emma Caulfield" a noble, self serving and slightly dim witted actress determined to make a difference for the world and more importantly for herself.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Anonymous

Spouse (1)

Cornelius Grobbelaar (23 August 2006 - present) (filed for divorce)

Trivia (14)

Attended San Francisco State University.
Her mother was a professional singer.
She was number 98 in a list of the worlds 100 sexiest women in 2003.
She is good friends with fellow thespian Karri V. Bowman.
26 May 2001 - Attended a two-day Armaggedon Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997) event with co-star James Marsters in Auckland, New Zealand
On the 6th season Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997) DVD, Joss Whedon says that her singing and dancing talents in the musical episode "Once More With Feeling" most surprised him over everyone else's talents in the cast. He gave Emma an additional singing number later in the series.
Attended the wedding of Alyson Hannigan and Alexis Denisof.
Is good friends with and keeps in touch with Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997) cast mates Alyson Hannigan, Anthony Head, Seth Green and Tom Lenk.
She was number 86 in a list of the worlds 100 sexiest women in 2002.
Filed for divorce from her husband Cornelius Grobbelaar after 3 years of marriage [May 13, 2010].
She has Luxembourgian (from her paternal grandmother), German, English, and Portuguese ancestry.
Her portrayal of DC Comics character Cameron Chase on Supergirl (2015) is the live action debut of the character.
(March 24, 2016) Expecting her 1st child, a daughter, with her boyfriend Mark Leslie Ford.
Is in a relationship with Mark Leslie Ford.

Personal Quotes (12)

I don't know that I want to act 15 years from now. I mean, I love the process of acting, but not the masochism. No matter how successful you get in Hollywood, you cannot rest. Your new movie doesn't open well; they're looking for the next person to replace you; it's always something. You never have true peace.
I'm a ridiculous sci-fi fan. In fact, I admit it freely; my manager is horrified. I just recently bought seasons two through five of Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) on DVD. And I've watched all the episodes, half on the plane and a few of them as I was going to sleep last night. There's something about sci-fi that's comforting. [February 2, 2003]
I was in London during my first sci-fi convention for Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997) and I was at the local bar, having a drink, writing in my journal, and this woman came up to me and said, "Do you want a drink? I said, "No, thank you. She pushed it a couple of times, and each time I said, "No, really I'm fine. Then she turned really cold, looked at me and said, "Someday these conventions will be your only outlet. I was like, wow, thanks, peace out, OK. [February 2, 2003]
[asked to name her most prized possession:] My cats. Bjorn and Brian Dennehy. They're Abyssinian. They're amazing, they're really like dogs. I actually went to a psychic once, and she said, 'You have two cats.' And I said, 'Yes, I do.' And she said, 'Yeah, there's one in particular, he's brown, he's a deep thinker, that cat.' So every time I see Bjorn staring into the fire, I'm like, 'Are you having deep thoughts, Bjorn?'" [February 2, 2003]
[about her last day on the Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997) set:] It was that sense that everything is coming to an end, like high school when you're about to graduate -- you really start taking notice of everyone, and noticing your surroundings. Especially when they start destroying sets that are no longer in use. Like, 'Oh my God, that used to be Xander's apartment, now it's just floors and a wall!' The last day, I really didn't think I was gonna cry at all. But as soon as they said: 'That's a show wrap for Emma Caulfield Ford!', I cried. I cried once, and that was it. I woke up the next morning like, 'OK, what's next?'" [May 21, 2003]
[about the character she played in Darkness Falls (2003)] She's the complete opposite of Anya. She's a sexually repressed, small-town schoolteacher
  • with a bombshell body, but you wouldn't know it because she hides it
with layers. It's symptomatic of what's going on in her life. [February 2, 2003]
I don't think I will ever get to play a character like Anya ever again. It was such a cultural phenomenon, and so well written.
[H]aving been on "Buffy" for many years I cannot escape the "bunny thing," it's ridiculous. I think it was maybe four episodes where it was referenced and now I'm synonymous with this bunny. For the record, no, I don't hate them - it was just my character.
My favorite role is not one I did on a show; I played a woman named Oona in a film called Timer, which was released earlier this year [2009]. I loved the character and everything about the film. Of everything I've done, that's the one I'm most proud of.
[on Buffy the Vampire Slayer] That was a period of my life that I am grateful to have had and it helped shape me in many ways. But it's over and anything creative that I had to give I gave it then.
[on her character of Anya in "Buffy the Vampire Slayer"] Anya was one of the most effortless jobs, but also the most challenging because she had so many layers. I was constantly walking a fine line in order to keep her real and funny.
[on Anya's death in "Chosen," the series finale of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer"] [Anya's death] was so abrupt and so sad. But I think that it made the whole journey that much more poignant that she did die that way. She didn't get a big maudlin send-off, it was just quick and to the point -- very Anya in that respect.

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