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Crypt of Curiosities: Peter Cushing as Dr. Who

  • DailyDead
In the realm of quintessentially British pop culture staples, few have quite the sheer amount of content as Doctor Who. For over fifty years, the escapades of the time-traveling Doctor and his many companions have delighted audiences the world over, spanning countless serials, TV episodes, audio dramas, comic books, and novels. Unfortunately, when it comes to cinema, the good Doctor is a lot less prolific.

Despite many, many studio attempts (covered in the wonderful Now on the Big Screen by Charles Norton), only three adaptations of Doctor Who ever made it to film. The Canadian TV movie Doctor Who in the ’90s, starring Paul McGann as the 8th Doctor, is commonly agreed to be a weak oddity, but that’s not what this article is about. Because in the mid-60s, the British horror studio Amicus Pictures got Peter Cushing, one of the greatest horror actors ever, to step in
See full article at DailyDead »

Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors

Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing costar in a worthwhile horror attraction -- and for once even share some scenes. Amicus gives us five tales of the uncanny, each with a clever twist or sting in its tail. Creepy mountebank Cushing deals the Tarot cards that spell out the grim fates in store; Chris Lee is a pompous art critic wih a handy problem. Also with Michael Gough and introducing a young Donald Sutherland. Dr. Terror's House of Horrors Blu-ray Olive Films 1965 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 98 min. / Street Date October 27, 2015 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98 <Starring Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing, Michael Gough, Donald Sutherland, Alan Freeman, Max Adrian, Roy Castle, Ursula Howells, Neil McCallum, Bernard Lee, Jennifer Jayne, Jeremy Kemp, Harold Lang, Katy Wild, Isla Blair, Al Mulock. Cinematography Alan Hume Film Editor Thelma Cornell Original Music Elizabeth Lutyens Written by Milton Subotsky Produced by Max Rosenberg, Milton Subotsky Directed by
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘The Calling’ – Donald Sutherland’s Tales Of Terror

The Calling sees Susan Sarandon investigate a string of peculiar murders, the victims’ faces manipulated into gruesome expressions. Assisting her in the process is fellow acting stalwart Donald Sutherland, playing a staple movie role, that of the priest in the presence of evil. It’s the latest in a long line of meaty supporting parts played by this versatile and highly-regarded actor, whose distinctive hangdog face can appear haunted, affable, wily or just plain saucy. With The Calling bringing a chill to cinemas this month, let’s take a look at some of Sutherland’s other characters from his intense and often skin-crawling back catalogue.

A good place to start is one of his first film appearances, in an unlikely project from the fledgling British horror producer Amicus. A simple train journey becomes a descent into darkness in…

Doctor Terror’S House Of Horrors (1965)

Would you talk to a man
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Doctor Who Re-Viewed: Peter Cushing's 'Dalekmania' movies

Digital Spy presents Doctor Who Week - seven days of special features celebrating the return of the world's favourite sci-fi series, and the arrival of a brand new Doctor on August 23.

"Allow me to introduce myself. I am Dr. Who."

Dr Who. Daleks - Invasion Earth: 2150 Ad (1966)

As far as odd surnames go, 'Who' has to be up there. But that's just one of many examples where the treatment of the subject matter differs between the two 1960s Doctor Who movie spinoffs and their original TV counterparts. Made to capitalise on the rampant 'Dalekmania' and starring Peter Cushing as the time traveller, a contemporary re-viewing provides a fascinating trip back to a comparatively innocent era where the draw of seeing "motorised dustbins" from Skaro in widescreen Technicolor was a big selling point.

William Hartnell's grouchy alien and his maladjusted granddaughter Susan from the BBC series have been replaced by
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Doctor Who Re-Viewed: Peter Cushing's 'Dalekmania' movies

Doctor Who Re-Viewed: Peter Cushing's 'Dalekmania' movies
Digital Spy presents Doctor Who Week - seven days of special features celebrating the return of the world's favourite sci-fi series, and the arrival of a brand new Doctor on August 23.

"Allow me to introduce myself. I am Dr. Who."

Dr Who. Daleks - Invasion Earth: 2150 Ad (1966)

As far as odd surnames go, 'Who' has to be up there. But that's just one of many examples where the treatment of the subject matter differs between the two 1960s Doctor Who movie spinoffs and their original TV counterparts. Made to capitalise on the rampant 'Dalekmania' and starring Peter Cushing as the time traveller, a contemporary re-viewing provides a fascinating trip back to a comparatively innocent era where the draw of seeing "motorised dustbins" from Skaro in widescreen Technicolor was a big selling point.

William Hartnell's grouchy alien and his maladjusted granddaughter Susan from the BBC series have been replaced by
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Tyburn Films: British Horror’s last line of Defence

1976 saw the publication of John Brosnan’s excellent book The Horror People. Written during the summer of 1975, it makes interesting reading 40 years down the line. Those who feature prominently in the book – Peter Cushing, Vincent Price, Jack Arnold, Michael Carreras, Sam Arkoff, Roy Ward Baker, Freddie Francis, Robert Bloch, Richard Matheson and Milton Subotsky – were still alive, as were Ralph Bates, Mario Bava, Jimmy Carreras, John Carradine, Dan Curtis, John Gilling, Robert Fuest, Michael Gough, Val Guest, Ray Milland, Robert Quarry and Michael Ripper, all of whom were given a mention. Boris Karloff, Lon Chaney Junior, Michael Reeves and James H Nicholson were not long dead. Hammer, Amicus and American International Pictures were still in existence. George A Romero had yet to achieve his prominence and Stephen King wasn’t even heard of!

Brosnan devoted a chapter to a new British company called Tyburn Films. Founded by the charismatic and ambitious Kevin Francis,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Eli Woods obituary

Comedian in the music-hall tradition who was a stuttering stooge to the great Jimmy James

Eli Woods, who has died aged 91, was one of the last links to the great era of twice-nightly British variety theatre. A stooped and gangling figure with a long, lugubrious face and permanently gaping mouth, clad in flapping trousers, too-tight jacket and deerstalker hat, he had a stammer which he exaggerated to tremendous comic effect. Woods spent his early career as a stooge for his uncle, Jimmy James, the innovative music-hall comedian who eschewed traditional jokes in favour of elaborate and surreal flights of fancy and was revered in the business as "the comedian's comedian".

James, too unusual and often unpredictable to reach the highest pinnacle of stardom, but cherished by discerning audiences as well as fellow pros, mostly improvised around two or three basic sketches, supported by a pair of grotesque individuals the belligerent Hutton Conyers,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Doctor Who: the film careers of Patrick Troughton & Tom Baker

Feature Alex Westthorp 9 Apr 2014 - 07:00

In the next part of his series, Alex talks us through the film careers of the second and fourth Doctors, Patrick Troughton and Tom Baker...

Read Alex's retrospective on the film careers of William Hartnell and Jon Pertwee, here.

Like their fellow Time Lord actors, William Hartnell and Jon Pertwee, Patrick Troughton and Tom Baker also shared certain genres of film. Both appeared, before and after their time as the Doctor, in horror movies and both worked on Ray Harryhausen Sinbad films.

Patrick George Troughton was born in Mill Hill, London on March 25th 1920. He made his film debut aged 28 in the 1948 B-Movie The Escape. Troughton's was a very minor role. Among the better known cast was William Hartnell, though even Hartnell's role was small and the two didn't share any scenes together. From the late Forties, Troughton found more success on the small screen,
See full article at Den of Geek »

The 1978 Radio Times: Christmas TV, before Thatcherism ruined it

Highbrow lectures, arthouse films and a spot of Steptoe and Son – the Christmas TV and radio schedules of the 1970s were smarter, kinder and more varied than today's

"The holiday starts here. And to put you in party mood some of your favourite comedians bring the spirit of pantomime to these pages. Mike Yarwood, on our cover, opens the festivities, followed by a host of BBC TV comedians – Michael Crawford, Ronnies Corbett and Barker, John Inman, Larry Grayson (with Isla St Clair, of course), Little and Large, and last, but not least, a villainous Peter Cook."

And so begins the bumper 118-page edition of the Christmas and New Year Radio Times for 1978. The 26-page guide to BBC television and radio for 23 December 1978 to 5 January 1979 is more than just a list of programmes: it's a fascinating historical document, revealing much about the country we were that last Christmas before Thatcherism arrived and changed everything.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Dr Who and the Daleks recap: the non-canon version with doddery Doctor

It may be the Day of the Doctor, but over on Channel 5, at 10.05am on Saturday, they are giving Peter Cushing's 1965 film an airing. Was it as bad as we remember?

'I don't know where we are' – Dr Who

Today, as you might have noticed, is the Day of the Doctor. Doctor Who's 50th anniversary is here, and it's an event on an unprecedented scale. A special episode – an extended, all-star, 3D special episode – is being shown around the world tonight, on TV and in cinemas, as the cherry on top of an almighty celebration. The Doctor, in all his incarnations, has become a true treasure.

Well, almost all his incarnations. While we're all gasping and cheering and hiding behind our sofas at whatever Steven Moffat has planned for us tonight, Dr Who and the Daleks – the non-canon Peter Cushing feature film from 1965 – is kicking its heels over
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Dr Who and the Daleks recap: the non-canon version with doddery Doctor

It may be the Day of the Doctor, but over on Channel 5, at 10.05am on Saturday, they are giving Peter Cushing's 1965 film an airing. Was it as bad as we remember?

'I don't know where we are' – Dr Who

Today, as you might have noticed, is the Day of the Doctor. Doctor Who's 50th anniversary is here, and it's an event on an unprecedented scale. A special episode – an extended, all-star, 3D special episode – is being shown around the world tonight, on TV and in cinemas, as the cherry on top of an almighty celebration. The Doctor, in all his incarnations, has become a true treasure.

Well, almost all his incarnations. While we're all gasping and cheering and hiding behind our sofas at whatever Steven Moffat has planned for us tonight, Dr Who and the Daleks – the non-canon Peter Cushing feature film from 1965 – is kicking its heels over
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Blu-ray Review - Dr. Who and the Daleks (1965)

Dr. Who and the Daleks, 1965.

Directed by Gordon Flemyng.

Starring Peter Cushing, Roy Castle, Jennie Linden and Roberta Tovey.

Synopsis:

The Doctor (Peter Cushing) discovers the planet of Skaro. A primitive world devasted by nuclear war and populated by two warring species, a peaceful tribe known as the Thrals and a life form heavily mutated by radiation, encased in protective machines. A merciless force of destruction known as The Daleks!

For my reviews of the Blu-ray releases of both Dr. Who and the Daleks and its sequel Daleks' Invasion Earth: 2150 A.D., I have enlisted the aid of my two youngest daughters (R - 8, B - 10) for I have clear memories of the films and they were yet to see either. The films were aimed at the youth of the day so I thought I’d see how today’s youth of HD Kindles, XBoxs and a new fast-paced Doctor Who
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Bernard Cribbins on 'Doctor Who': 'Daleks are dustbins with attitude'

Actor, comedian, musician and all-round legend Bernard Cribbins OBE has the unique distinction of being the only actor to have faced Doctor Who's most enduring villains the Daleks on the big and small screen...

His first brush with the fearsome pepper-pots - 1966 film Daleks - Invasion Earth: 2150 A.D. - is available to enjoy on DVD and Blu-ray from today (May 27), alongside its predecessor, 1965's Dr Who and the Daleks.

To mark the release, Digital Spy spoke with Cribbins about his movie co-star Peter Cushing, Aussie Daleks and his return to the show alongside David Tennant's Time Lord...

How did you first get involved with the world of Doctor Who in Daleks - Invasion Earth: 2150 A.D.?

"I honestly can't remember! The connection, as far as I recall, was probably Peter Cushing himself - he'd done one Dalek film with Roy Castle and I'd worked with Peter on another film,
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Bernard Cribbins on 'Doctor Who': 'Daleks are dustbins with attitude'

Bernard Cribbins on 'Doctor Who': 'Daleks are dustbins with attitude'
Actor, comedian, musician and all-round legend Bernard Cribbins OBE has the unique distinction of being the only actor to have faced Doctor Who's most enduring villains the Daleks on the big and small screen...

His first brush with the fearsome pepper-pots - 1966 film Daleks - Invasion Earth: 2150 A.D. - is available to enjoy on DVD and Blu-ray from today (May 27), alongside its predecessor, 1965's Dr Who and the Daleks.

To mark the release, Digital Spy spoke with Cribbins about his movie co-star Peter Cushing, Aussie Daleks and his return to the show alongside David Tennant's Time Lord...

How did you first get involved with the world of Doctor Who in Daleks - Invasion Earth: 2150 A.D.?

"I honestly can't remember! The connection, as far as I recall, was probably Peter Cushing himself - he'd done one Dalek film with Roy Castle and I'd worked with Peter on another film,
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Farewell, BBC TV Centre. You were Britain's very own Disneyland | Stewart Lee

Having been home to everyone from Roy Castle to Richard Stilgoe, the closure of the BBC TV's old magical headquarters is a sad day for British culture

Last week I attended the ceremonial destruction of BBC TV Centre, which was enthusiastically blown to pieces in a controlled nuclear explosion by a delighted David Cameron. With one hand on the detonator and the other jiggling in his pocket, David Cameron was flanked by representatives of the principal faith groups, as well as leading commercial broadcasters, free-market economists, wealthy pornographers, and a child who had won a hopping competition. The prime minister triumphantly flobbed a final Green Ernie into the crater, before it was filled with a celebratory cocktail of toxic waste, liquid concrete and dogs' messes.

A Red Arrows flypast drowned out the band of the Coldstream Guards, playing a rousing rendition of Phyllis Dillon's Don't Touch Me Tomato, a personal
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

From the archive, 14 June 1975: Booking the cabaret for the Titanic

Not even showbiz royalty is spared as Guardian critic Stanley Reynolds casts his acerbic eye over the entertainment industry

For years now we have been playing a game called Booking the Cabaret for the Titanic. I think we first booked Shirley Bassey, of the fluttering fingers and shimmering gowns, and that must have been a dozen years ago at least, and the damned boat hasn't sailed yet. Roy Castle of the desperate mateyness and the sub-Sammy Davis Junior, look-at-me-i'm-Mr-Showbiz-too-tap-dancing-and-blowing-the-bugle, was on the Titanic's bill in those days. That was when we had Sunday Night at the London Palladium and he was never off it. But Roy is no longer booked for the Titanic Cabaret. Shirley is, though, and just in case you've got doubts about her worthiness watch her tomorrow night on BBC 2. "I who have nothing," Shirley sings. Not true Shirley. You've got a booking on the Titanic.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Retro Review: Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors

  • DailyDead
Five strangers board a train and are joined by a mysterious fortune teller who offers to read their tarot cards. Each man has a different story to tell including an architect who returns to his ancestral home to find a werewolf out for revenge, a doctor who finds out his wife is a vampire, a huge plant which traps the occupants of a house inside, a musician who gets involved in voodoo and an art critic who is tormented by the severed hand of a famous artist.

As with many of my other reviews for Amicus films, I always start off with the point that they tried to rival Hammer as far as British horror went but never really managed to compete consistently with them. However they did find their niche in the genre, in particular the horror anthology. Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors is their best one and
See full article at DailyDead »

Dench Backs Lung Cancer Awareness Drive

  • WENN
Dench Backs Lung Cancer Awareness Drive
Dame Judi Dench has teamed up with a U.K. charity to warn about the dangers of smoking, after losing her husband to lung cancer.

The veteran actress was left devastated when her partner of 30 years, Michael Williams, died of the disease in 2001.

And Dench is backing The Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation's Women Against Lung Cancer campaign to raise awareness of symptoms associated with the illness.

She says, "As a woman who has lost her husband to lung cancer, this is a campaign close to my heart.

"I would urge women who smoke to consider giving up or to be vigilant to the symptoms and see their doctor as early as possible if they have any concerns."

Tweeting advice for Gwyneth Paltrow

Unleash your funny side, listen to Mike Tyson and, most importantly, get typing...

Well, you've only gone and got yourself a Twitter account, Gwyneth Paltrow (@gwynethpaltrow). Obviously not content with being a mere Oscar-winner, internet lifestyle impresario, celebrity chef, Cee Lo Green tribute act, and queen of all things mung bean, you have decided to add "Twitter guru" to your CV. Sadly your first tweet ("This is my first Tweet!") didn't exactly set the world alight. You need to knuckle down, Gwynie.

More one-liners

Keep the serious stuff for your lifestyle blog, Goop, Twitter is all about the jokes. Luckily you seem to have a handle on this. When it was reported that you were looking for a tutor for your children who could teach Ancient Greek, Latin, French, Japanese and Mandarin, on top of giving sailing and tennis lessons, you responded with: "Looking for tutor for kids. $195K per day.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Gays of our Lives (February 09, 2009)

Degrassi: The Next Generation has a long history of prominent gay characters and this season is no exception. Earlier this year we met Riley Stavros, a teenager struggling with his sexuality, unable to accept that he is gay. With an episode featuring Riley set to air this week on The N, we decided to chat via e-mail with Argiris Karras, who plays the troubled young man, to get his thoughts on his role.

Argiris Karras

AfterElton.com: Tell us something about yourself. How old are you? Where are you from? What do you do for fun? What kind of music do you listen to?

Argiris Karras: I'm 19 years old and I was born in Toronto, Ontario, one of the greatest cities around!

For fun I often chill with my friends and do a whole bunch of random things such as play soccer and video games, watch movies and listen to music.
See full article at The Backlot »
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