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Overview (2)

Date of Birth 31 December 1938Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Date of Death 31 October 1995Los Angeles, California, USA  (cancer)

Mini Bio (2)

Rosalind Cash was an actress whose career endured and flourished on stage, screen, and television, despite her staunch refusal to portray stereotypical Black roles. Ms. Cash was nominated for an Emmy for her work on the Public Broadcasting Service production of American Playhouse: Go Tell It on the Mountain (1985). She was popular in other highly rated television productions, including the special King Lear (1983) and Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones (1980). She also guest starred on such popular television series as Barney Miller (1974), Police Story (1973), Kojak (1973), Mary Tyler Moore (1970), China Beach (1988), Thirtysomething (1987), Cagney & Lacey (1981), and Hill Street Blues (1981).

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Anonymous

Spunky and intelligent African-American actress who played strong female characters in a career that was arguably under appreciated by Hollywood, possibly for her refusal to play stereotypical Negro characters on screen. Cash's first film appearance was a minor role in the thriller Klute (1971), however she so impressed the right people that Cash was cast in the female lead in an inter-racial relationship with screen legend Charlton Heston in the post-apocalyptic horror of The Omega Man (1971). Plus, she was perfect as the sensitive nurse "Lorrie" falling in love with troubled rookie police officer Stacy Keach in The New Centurions (1972) and she made a wonderful "Goneril" in the critically praised TV production of Great Performances: King Lear (1974).

Strangely enough, Cash struggled to land meatier roles in feature films, but she was kept pretty busy guest starring in key TV shows of the 1970s and 1980s including Good Times (1974), Starsky and Hutch (1975), Barney Miller (1974), Hill Street Blues (1981) and many more. Sadly, Cash passed away from cancer on October 31st 1995.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: firehouse44@hotmail.com

Trade Mark (1)


Trivia (11)

Born at 6:27pm, EST.
Inducted into the Black Filmmakers' Hall of Fame in 1992.
Graduated from Atlantic City High School in 1956.
Was a member of an acting workshop at the Harlem YMCA.
Began her career by forming and working with the Negro Ensemble Company.
Took English literature classes at City College in New York.
Was an honor student in high school.
She was one of four children, the others being John, Robert and Helen. All were born and raised in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Brother John (1936-1998), enjoyed a long illustrious career with the United States Army as Colonel John A. Cash. He died in 1998 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
Was nominated for an Emmy Award for her work on the Public Broadcasting Service production of American Playhouse: Go Tell It on the Mountain (1985).
In 1987, Cash was given the Phoenix Award by the Black American Cinema Society in honor of her achievements.
In 1968 she landed a role in the Washington D.C. production of "The Great White Hope", a play about the career of African American boxer Jack Johnson. The part was a choice one, but at the same time an even better opportunity opened up: a slot with the Negro Ensemble Company (NEC), a pioneering organization devoted to presenting plays by black writers and furthering the careers of black actors and theater personnel. Cash pulled out of the Washington production, having to turn over two weeks' salary to the theater involved, so that she could return to New York and join the NEC as one of its founding members.

Personal Quotes (2)

Maybe I've handled it [my career] all wrong, but I've gotten what I wanted to get out of it. That's a sense of being true to myself. I came to a point where I said I know there are things I am not going to do for money.
I'm not good at playing stereotypes. I don't ingratiate myself to the powers-that-be as some nice, Negro, colored, abiding person. You cannot depend on me to be that Negro that you have come to know and love, that you're used to.

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