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Judy Carne Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (4) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (3) | Trade Mark (1) | Trivia (11)

Overview (4)

Date of Birth 27 April 1939Northampton, Northamptonshire, England, UK
Date of Death 3 September 2015Northampton, Northamptonshire, England, UK  (pneumonia)
Birth NameJoyce Audrey Botterill
Height 5' 3" (1.6 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Trained in music and dance, tiny-framed, pixie-like Judy Carne was born Joyce Botterill in Northampton, England in 1939, the daughter of a grocer. Trained in dance, she appeared in music revues as a teenager and changed her name at the advice of a dance teacher. Slowly building up a career on British TV, she arrived in America in 1962, the eve of the mid-60s "British invasion," and appeared to good advantage on the TV series Fair Exchange (1962). Beginning unobtrusively in film, she developed enough as a light comedienne to score well on the smaller screen and won a regular role on the sitcom The Baileys of Balboa (1964). Stardom came with her own romantic comedy series Love on a Rooftop (1966) opposite the late Pete Duel. The latter series, though short-lived, was quite popular and showcased Carne's appeal to maximum advantage. She found herself embraced by America as a cute, pert-nosed Cockney lass with a Peter Pan-like effervescence.

It was no surprise when a couple of years later she soared to "flower power" stardom on the hip and highly irreverent TV cult variety show Laugh-In (1967), where she introduced the phrase "Sock it to me!" to the American vernacular. As the plucky brunette, she always seemed to be on the receiving end of a slapstick prank, but the audiences loved her for it. The show also made instant household names out of fellow Laugh-In comrades Arte Johnson, Ruth Buzzi, Henry Gibson, Jo Anne Worley, Lily Tomlin, and, notably, Goldie Hawn, who managed to out-perk even Judy and grab the lion's share of attention. Judy proved herself a game sport for a while, but made the decision to leave the series after only two seasons-- tired of the grind, the typecast, and the disappointment of having her singing/dancing skills undermined.

In the long run it probably was a major career mistake. With the exception of her role as Polly (the Julie Andrews roles) in a Broadway revival of "The Boy Friend" that also featured Sandy Duncan, Judy's post "Laugh-In" professional life was unexceptional with a surprising quick descent. There were a couple of mini-movies, a failed TV idea for a sitcom called "Poor Judy", a failed Las Vegas music act, and the TV talk show circuit. Nothing panned out. Despite an innocent, bubbly, cheery exterior, her private life was anything but. Her 1963 marriage to rising star Burt Reynolds was over within a couple of years. The divorce was acrimonious, to say the least, with nasty, below-the-belt accusations being flung from both sides and feeding the tabloid sheets. A second marriage to TV producer Robert Bergman in 1970 lasted even less than that. More problematic, however, was Judy's escalating financial problems and a drug problem which started with marijuana and hallucinogens and developed into a full-fledged heroin addiction.

In the late 60s and 70s she tried to maintain somewhat with scattered appearances on the musical and comedy stage with roles in "Cabaret" (as Sally Bowles), "Absurd Person Singular," "There's a Girl in My Soup", "The Owl and the Pussycat" and "Blithe Spirit". Her career pretty much in shambles, she fell quickly into the lifestyle of a junkie and began living in squalor. For the next decade, she literally dropped out of sight. The only time she was heard from was when she was busted for a drug arrest or when she made unhappy headlines for a near-fatal 1978 car crash (her ex-husband Robert was driving) that left her with a broken neck.

Judy's tell-all 1985 autobiography "Laughing on the Outside, Crying on the Inside" was a harrowing and heart-wrenching read with explicit detailing of her descent into degradation. Despite the book, the adorable English girl who captured America's heart in the late 1960s failed to win back a now-disinterested audience. She remains a prime example of what the flip side of a glamorous Hollywood can turn out to be. Living in England, she has not been heard of much since the publishing of the book. She has allegedly been married twice more since then. She was also in attendance for the televised 25th anniversary of "Laugh-In" and a televised "Laugh-In" Christmas show both in 1993. She resides in her hometown of Northampton, England

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Gary Brumburgh / gr-home@pacbell.net

Spouse (3)

Robert Bergman (3 May 1970 - 1978) (divorced)
Burt Reynolds (28 June 1963 - 1967) (divorced)
John McCook (? - ?)

Trade Mark (1)

The 'Sock It to Me' Girl

Trivia (11)

Ex-husband Burt Reynolds invited Judy as his guest the first time he guest-hosted The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson (1962) in the early 70s. They hadn't spoken in six years.
She was one of the actresses considered for the lead role of Eglantine Price in Disney's Bedknobs and Broomsticks (1971). Her performance of one of the film's songs, "Subsititutiary Locomotion," ended up on a Disneyland LP record containing cover versions of the songs (catalog # STER-1326).
"Laugh-In" producer George Schlatter initially blamed her for trying to break up the Laugh-In "family" by leaving after only two seasons.
In July of 1969, during her "Laugh-In" heyday, Judy performed "American Moon" on the Ed Sullivan show. Sullivan, known for mispronouncing names, introduced her as "Judy Crane".
Judy auditioned for and won the lead role of Julie Willis in the sitcom called Love on a Rooftop (1966). She was paired with actor Pete Duel, someone she knew and had met when she did a one-episode stint on the "Gidget" TV series. She later guested on his "Alias Smith and Jones" TV series. Duel later committed suicide.
While on a promotional tour for the TV series Fair Exchange (1962) Judy met Burt Reynolds. After a six-month courtship the two were married on June 28th 1963. The marriage lasted but two years. She never asked for alimony. Reynolds would be there for her in later years when she was dealing with financial woes amid her drug problems.
When she was nine she was accepted to the prestigious Bush-Davies Theatrical School for Girls, in East Grinstead, England near London. An instructor there began calling her "Judy" explaining that "Joyce" wasn't a good professional name. At sixteen she took her professional name Judy Carne. Carne comes from a character in the play "Sister Bonaventure.".
Began dancing at her aunt's dancing school then moved to the Pitt-Draffen Academy of Dance.
At the age of six she performed in a local concert and won the encouragement of her parents to continue.
Appeared twice on "I Dream of Jeannie", once as a character and later as herself.
Living in her birth town of Northampton, England. [2001]

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