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Peter Capaldi Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (2) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trade Mark (3) | Trivia (16) | Personal Quotes (41)

Overview (2)

Date of Birth 14 April 1958Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Height 6' (1.83 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Brought up in Glasgow, Scotland, Peter Capaldi attended drama classes and was accepted into the Glasgow School of Art. While studying there he secured his breakthrough role in Local Hero (1983).

He was announced the 12th Doctor Who 4th August 2013 on a BBC special programme. He had to hide it from his daughter who remarked to him why it is his name never came up during the buzz. It was a huge relief not to have to keep the secret anymore. His agent called and said "Hello Doctor" when informing him he had gotten the part.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Anon

Spouse (1)

Elaine Collins (1991 - present) (1 child)

Trade Mark (3)

Gravelly voice with a thick Scottish accent
Thin frame
Intense angry stare

Trivia (16)

Was the lead singer of a punk rock band, Dreamboys, which included Craig Ferguson as the drummer and Temple Clark as the bassist.
He is a patron of the Association for International Cancer Research and of a Scottish children's charity, the Aberlour Child Care Trust.
He had been to an audition in the morning where he felt that he was made "to jump through hoops" for a small role by people he had worked with before. This frustrating audition gave him the mind-set at the next audition on that day, for the role of Malcolm Tucker in The Thick of It (2005). Armando Iannucci found him perfect for the role.
Played a character called "W.H.O. Doctor" in World War Z (2013) before being cast in the lead role for Doctor Who (2005).
He is the first actor to play the Doctor in the revamped Doctor Who (2005) to be born before the original series first premiered.
He is the only Oscar winner to play the Doctor, although not for acting-for best live-action short film.
He is the third actor to play the Doctor who also played a previous role in the show. The first was Colin Baker, the second was Matt Smith.
Capaldi is the third Scottish actor to play the role of the Doctor in the TV series, following Sylvester McCoy, who played the Seventh Doctor, and David Tennant, who played the Tenth Doctor.
He is only the third actor to play the Doctor who has been older than the actor he replaced in the role. The others were Jon Pertwee, who was a year older than Patrick Troughton, and Colin Baker, who was eight years older than Peter Davison. Capaldi is tied with the First Doctor, William Hartnell, to be the oldest actors cast in the role-both were age 55 when cast.
His father was of Italian descent and his mother was of Irish ancestry.
Like David Tennant, he was a lifelong Doctor Who (2005) fan before he got to play the role.
He auditioned for a place in the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts (RADA) but was rejected.
When he was 15, he sent a letter to ''Doctor Who'' magazine in tribute to Roger Delgado who played The Master in the original Doctor Who (1963) series.
He became an actor because of his love of Doctor Who (1963) and the hope that he would one day get to appear on the show.
Long before World War Z (2013), Capaldi was considered for a another zombie film-he was favored to play Rawlings in Lifeforce (1985).
On The All New Alexei Sayle Show (1994), Peter Calpaldi played intoxicated time traveler Doug Hatton in the re-occurring sketch 'Drunk in Time'.

Personal Quotes (41)

Being asked to play the Doctor is an amazing privilege. Like the Doctor himself I find myself in a state of utter terror and delight. I can't wait to get started.
The big reason that Doctor Who is still with us is because of every single viewer who ever turned on to watch this show, at any age, at any time in its history and in their history and who took it into their heart -- because Doctor Who belongs to all of us. Everyone made Doctor Who.
I destroyed all my geek stuff because I didn't want to be a geek, and I regret it to this day. Consumed in the geek bonfire of the vanities was a collection of autographs and letters from Peter Cushing, Spike Milligan and Frankie Howerd, the first Doctor Whos, actual astronauts and many more. I wish I'd known that one day the geek would inherit the Earth.
I can't imagine I'll be the new George Clooney. That's not really in the cards.
Hollywood producers aren't going to say, 'Get me that swearing, grey-haired, headless chicken. We need him for our new 'High School Musical' movie!'
Every viewer who ever turned on 'Doctor Who' has taken him into his heart. He belongs to all of us.
Doctor Who' belongs to all of us. Everybody makes 'Doctor Who.
A girl once came to my beery flat in Kensal Green, opened the blinds and cooked me breakfast. I married her.
It's weathered many a storm, but the British film industry is, thankfully, still afloat.
I'm pretty good for an old geek.
I'm not an extravagant man. The fact that I can have a coffee out whenever I want still makes me feel grateful.
I suppose I just like being arty. That's all. Arty.
I never really think of acting and directing as being separate; they are just different expressions of the same thing.
I love people where, at the end of the day, they'll pick up a paintbrush and paint clouds. They can physically make things.
I haven't played Doctor Who since I was 9 on the playground.
I don't like parties. There was never a party I was at where I didn't wish I was somewhere else.
The Americans just have a great sort of wit about them.
Real heroes are all around us and uncelebrated.
One of the very, very exciting things I have found here in L.A. is that no one talks to you about being Scottish. Whereas, if you are in London and you are trying to put films together and be a film-maker, there is a kind of unspoken sense that, if you are Scottish, you have something to overcome or else you cannot really do that project.
My childhood growing up in that part of Glasgow always sounds like some kind of sub-Catherine Cookson novel of earthy working-class immigrant life, which to some extent it was, but it wasn't really as colourful that.
I've been really terrible in a lot of things because I learned by making mistakes. That makes you a different kind of actor, because you have to figure out for yourself what you do.
I hated improvisation because in my early days as an actor, improvisation meant somebody had just come down from Oxford and they were doing a play above a pub in Kentish Town, and the biggest ego would win.
I don't want to find myself at the age of 60 waiting by the telephone for someone else to decide if I am capable of being in what might be a crummy TV production.
Even though I am a lifelong 'Doctor Who' fan, I've not played him since I was nine. I downloaded old scripts and practised those in front of the mirror.
At 17 years old, STG took me under its wing and shared its resources and wisdom with me, even allowing me to take part in a show at the Edinburgh Festival. Without STG and the Ramshorn Theatre, I would not have found access to the world of drama that I later made my profession.
What you're doing is acting with yourself. Well, I'm my favourite actor, so in a way it's quite straightforward for me.
When I was acting, I was always asking abut the mechanics of filmmaking. I decided I would learn what everyone on set was doing, so I would feel less threatened.
What I've learnt being an actor is that you've got to be lucky. I got less lucky, and nobody was interested. If a part came up, it would be for the main corpse's friend's brother who was having problems with his marriage.
What annoys me about it is that your fate is always in somebody else's hands. It's always up to somebody else to decide whether or not they want you in their show and so the majority of actors have to play out a waiting game. The constant fear is that it could all end tomorrow.
The only time I've tried to make plans, the cosmic sledgehammer has intervened and something else has happened. You just have to wait and see what comes your way, so that's what I do.
The difference between movies and TV is that in TV you have to have a trauma every week, but that event may not be the biggest event in the characters' lives.
The biggest thing I have realised was that you have to choose your collaborators very carefully, and that not everybody can like you. The process of filmmaking is so difficult, there's no point in doing it unless you can do it the way you want.
STG and the Ramshorn Theatre are a vital part of Glasgow's rich cultural history. To abandon them now is to abandon not only our past, but our future.
Scottish men of a certain age have a black response to almost everything as a measure of how sophisticated they are. I have a very long fuse that eventually explodes after building up a nice head of steam, although it's only happened three times - usually at work when someone takes me for granted.
I've been influenced by the entire history of Doctor Who and by every actor who's played Doctor Who, and everybody who's worked on the show and made those episodes. I wouldn't be here doing this if it hadn't been for the twelve actors who brilliantly played the part, often in times when it wasn't as easy to be Doctor Who or as welcome to be Doctor Who as it is now. So really I stand on their shoulders.
When you're a child, you just want to be whichever Doctor is on TV, whether that's William Hartnell, Patrick Troughton, Jon Pertwee or Tom Baker.
I grew up in the Sixties with Doctor Who (1963) and The Beatles and Sunday Night at the London Palladium and school milk and bronchitis. All that stuff. It's part of my DNA. When I had my first proper TARDIS scene there was a nice props guy telling me how to work the console. Secretly I was thinking, "I know how to work the TARDIS! I've known for a long time - probably longer than you".
There's almost a Grimms' fairy tales element to the show. The Doctor appears and takes people deep into the forest where there are monsters, but he delivers them back safely at the end. That's very, very attractive. Plus I love monsters. Everyone does! Any shows with monsters in them work.
The nice thing about Doctor Who is, whatever people say, you know someone somewhere loves you. And they always will. The more everyone else hates you, the more that person will say, "He's my Doctor".
[on Doctor Who (2005)] The things I've always adored are still there. That relationship between light and dark, the domestic and the epic. There's a feeling you could step from a supermarket car park on Earth into the Andromeda Nebula or whatever.
[on playing an older Doctor] Whereas with Matt and David before me there was this romantic thing going on, we don't do that. We have something else which I really like. There's not another relationship you can compare it to. It's not like uncle and niece. He is not a grandfather figure. But because Jenna's so wonderful, we've found something that's different, and yet it works.

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