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3 items from 2005


Festival du Nouveau Cinéma!

13 October 2005 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- Like a kid in a candy store! is how most cinephiles will feel about Claude Chamberland's Festival du Nouveau Cinéma (Oct 13-23) – this gathering of off-beat, scooped-up oddities found from all over the international circuit and from premiere film festivals such as Cannes and Venice is an innovative festival where auteur-driven visionary films are served up as a full-course movie menu. The wolf has been unleashed! Programming director Chamberland unveiling the 34th edition. (pic from official site) It is simply amazing! 38 countries, 197 films, 95 features and 102 shorts constitute the 2005 line up. With 197 works from all over the world (38 countries) to be shown over ten days, the Festival remains true to its mission of promoting quality cinema by today’s finest talents. The program includes 13 world premieres and 54 international and North American premieres and 19 Canadian premieres. The program includes: Capote (Bennett Miller), Hidden (Michael Haneke), The Child (Dardenne brothers »

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Heading South

9 September 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

VENICE, Italy -- Laurent Cantet's thoughtful drama "Heading South" examines the time in the 1970s when Haiti was known as a destination for sexual tourists, well-off women of a certain age from North America who spent their money seeking pleasure amongst the carefree local boys on the beautiful beaches.

The screenplay, by Cantet and Robin Campillo, is based on three short stories by Dany Laferriere and draws on the lives of three women who in key scenes address the camera directly. Their candid admissions of what they seek and why, and the realities they are reluctant to confront, make for an absorbing tale that could do well, especially with female audiences fond of "Shirley Valentine" and its ilk.

"Heading South", screened in competition at Venice, is a very different film from that sentimental crowd-pleaser, but the women's motives aren't so far apart. Ellen (Charlotte Rampling), Brenda (Karen Young) and Sue (Louise Portal) each find something in the engaging, attentive and lissome young beach boy Legba (Menothy Cesar) they cannot find at home, even if they must pay for it.

Ellen, who has been holidaying in Haiti for six years, is not bothered by it at all. She's 55, a lecturer on French literature at Wellesley and disgusted by the men of Boston. "I always thought that when I was old I would pay younger men to make love to me," Ellen says, echoing the celebrated words of Francoise Sagan.

Brenda, who is from Georgia, met Legba while on holiday with her husband, Mark. "I threw myself on him. It was my first orgasm. I was 45," she says. That was three years ago. Now Mark is history, and she's back.

Sue, from Montreal, is plump and vivacious. "I feel like a butterfly here -- free, unattached. We all feel different here," she says.

But what the tourists don't know about Legba and life on Haiti under the ruthless dictatorship of "Baby Doc" Duvalier is summed up in one word: everything.

While the whites live in luxury, the Haitians live in desperate poverty and powerless fear. The scrupulously polite and efficient hotel manager Albert (Lys Ambroise) also speaks to the camera, telling of his father and grandfather and their abiding hatred of all white people, especially Americans.

Rampling, whose beauty continues to light up the screen, is wonderful as Ellen in her assuredness and her casual manipulation of others and in the small ways she betrays her insecurity. Young also is particularly good as a woman prepared to throw out everything she knows to make up for lost time. Cesar makes Legba's appeal believable, and Portal and Ambroise add solid support.

As the ugliness of life in the heart of paradise spills over to the spoiled intruders, they react to what they discover in quite different ways. Cantet keeps a lid on a story that he could have easily exploited, but he makes his points about beauty, fulfillment, self-indulgence and delusion with a measured hand.

HEADING SOUTH

Haut et Court, Les Films Seville, France 3 Cinema, StudioCanal

Credits:

Director: Laurent Cantet

Screenwriters: Laurent Cantet & Robin Campillo

Producers: Caroline Benjo, Carole Scotta, Simon Arnal

Director of photography: Pierre Milon

Art director: Franckie Diago

Editor: Robin Campillo

Cast:

Ellen: Charlotte Rampling

Brenda: Karen Young

Sue: Louise Portal

Legba: Menothy Cesar

Albert: Lys Ambroise

Eddy: Jackensen Pierre Olmo Diaz

No MPAA rating

Running time -- 105 mins »

Permalink | Report a problem


Heading South

8 September 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

VENICE -- Laurent Cantet's thoughtful drama "Heading South" examines the time in the '70s when Haiti was known as a destination for sexual tourists, well-off women of a certain age from North America, who spent their money seeking pleasure amongst the carefree local boys on the beautiful beaches.

The screenplay, by Cantet and Robin Campillo, is based on three short stories by Dany Laferriere and draws on the lives of three women who in key scenes address the camera directly. Their candid admissions of what they seek and why, and the realities they are reluctant to confront, make for an absorbing tale that could do well, especially with female audiences fond of "Shirley Valentine" and its ilk.

"Heading South", screened In Competition at the Venice International Film Festival, is a very different film from that sentimental crowd-pleaser but the women's motives aren't so far apart. Ellen (Charlotte Rampling), Brenda (Karen Young) and Sue (Louise Portal) each find something in the engaging, attentive and lissome young beach boy Legba (Menothy Cesar) they cannot find at home, even if they must pay for it.

Ellen, who has been holidaying in Haiti for six years, is not bothered by it at all. She's 55, a lecturer on French literature at Wellesley and disgusted by the men of Boston. "I always thought that when I was old I would pay younger men to make love to me," Ellen says, echoing the celebrated words of Francoise Sagan.

Brenda, who is from Georgia, met Legba while on holiday with her husband Mark. "I threw myself on him. It was my first orgasm. I was 45," she says. That was three years ago. Now Mark is history and she's back.

Sue, from Montreal, is plump and vivacious. "I feel like a butterfly here, free, unattached. We all feel different here," she says.

But what the tourists don't know about Legba and life on Haiti under the ruthless dictatorship of "Baby Doc" Duvalier is summed up in one word: everything.

While the whites live in luxury, the Haitians live in desperate poverty and powerless fear. The scrupulously polite and efficient hotel manager Albert (Lys Ambroise) also speaks to the camera, telling of his father and grandfather and their abiding hatred of all white people, especially Americans.

Rampling, whose beauty continues to light up the screen, is wonderful as Ellen both in her assuredness, her casual manipulation of others, and in the small ways she betrays her insecurity. Young also is particularly good as a woman prepared to throw out everything she knows in order to make up for lost time. Cesar makes Legba's appeal believable, and Portal and Ambroise add solid support.

As the ugliness of life in the heart of paradise spills over to the spoiled intruders, they react to what they discover in quite different ways. Cantet keeps a lid on a story that he could have easily exploited but he makes his points about beauty, fulfillment, self-indulgence and delusion with a measured hand.

HEADING SOUTH

Haut et Court, Les Films Seville, France 3 Cinema, StudioCanal

Credits:

Director: Laurent Cantet

Screenwriters: Laurent Cantet & Robin Campillo

Producers: Caroline Benjo, Carole Scotta, Simon Arnal

Director of photography: Pierre Milon

Art director: Franckie Diago

Editor: Robin Campillo

Cast:

Ellen: Charlotte Rampling

Brenda: Karen Young

Sue: Louise Portal

Legba: Menothy Cesar

Albert: Lys Ambroise

Eddy: Jackensen Pierre Olmo Diaz

No MPAA rating

Running time -- 105 mins »

Permalink | Report a problem


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3 items from 2005


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