Christian Camargo Poster


Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trivia (10) | Personal Quotes (14)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 7 July 1971New York City, New York, USA
Birth NameChristian Minnick
Height 6' 1" (1.85 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Christian Camargo was born on July 7, 1971 in New York City, New York, USA as Christian Minnick. He is an actor and producer, known for The Hurt Locker (2008), Guiding Light (1952) and K-19: The Widowmaker (2002). He has been married to Juliet Rylance since November 2008.

Spouse (1)

Juliet Rylance (November 2008 - present)

Trivia (10)

Son of actress Victoria Wyndham
Grandson of actor Ralph Camargo
Worked at the school radio station and played lacrosse.
Went to The Julliard School, New York, NY (Certificate) Audition included works by Milton and an aria from La Traviata.
Educated at Hobart College, Geneva, NY (B.A. Degree- Art History).
Studied with Herbert Bergoff at HB studios in New York City
Nephew of Felice Camargo
In November of 2000, opened "Fast Ashleys" vintage car shop and photo studio in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.
February 12 - March 6 Starring in the title role of "Coriolanus" at the Theatre For A New Audience in NYC. [February 2005]
Christian Camargo is married to award winning actress Juliet Rylance.

Personal Quotes (14)

There's something about my Mexican-American heritage... I'm proud of it.
I see theater as a simple formula. Audience plus players plus story makes the play.
I've played Hamlet and Coriolanus, Orlando in 'As You like It' and Ariel in 'Tempest,' among others.
My parents had a difficult divorce.
For reasons I don't fully understand, tragic love has a certain appeal.
Juilliard is wonderful in that they don't pick just one way of working. They give you a palette. There is method acting. There is a lot of attention to Shakespeare and verse.
Any part I do is a marriage of the words - what the playwright or producer or show runner's vision is - to how I would play it. It took me a while to get rid of 'Oh, they want it this way, so I'm going to do it how they want it.'
Actors are the most generous people when it comes to sharing their technique. But if you grew up in a household of carpenters, and you're making a table, everyone would have a different way of doing it.
No matter where we are or how advanced we think we are, there are elemental issues of our civilization that stories help us work through.
If you're going to do Shakespeare, do Shakespeare. There's a reason why he's been performed for hundreds of years. His words affect people on a very deep level. He's the true humanist. That all comes through his text, his words.
When you are cast for a role, it's because of everything that makes you who you are in that moment in time. No one else has that. That's a unique, powerful thing to hold.
My parents had a difficult divorce. My dad had to take a backseat for a few years, and my grandfather came in. He was also my inspiration for becoming an actor. I really respected him.
Sometimes, there's a preconceived notion of how a scene or how a work should be delivered. And I see young performers sometimes try and deliver that, and it's not really true to their voice or who they are.
Shakespeare gives you these clues - these little pieces of gold dust, I call them. They tell you so much about the story, the character, the drive, the intentions. It's like a gift.

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