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In the Spotlight Series: 39 Steps

Adapted by Tony nominated author Patrick Barlow from an original concept by Simon Corble and Nobby Dimon, and based on the book by John Buchan and the classic 1935 Alfred Hitchcock film, 39 Steps is currently playingat the Union Square Theatre.39 Steps is a comedic spoof of the classic 1935 film, with only 4 'insanely talented' actors portraying more than 150 characters, sometimes changing roles in the blink of an eye. The brilliantly madcap story follows our dashing heroRichard Hannay Robert Petkoff as he races to solve the mystery of The 39 Steps, all the while trying to clear his name. The show's uproarious fast-paced 100 minutes promises to leave you gasping for breath... in a good way It's fun for everyone from 9 to 99.Below, BroadwayWorld brings you photos of the company in the BroadwayWorld.com series 'In The Spotlight' by acclaimed photographerWalter McBride
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Stage Tube: On This Day for 1/15/15- The 39 Steps

Today in 2008, The 39 Steps opend at the American Airlines Theatre, where it ran for 771 performances. The play is a farce adapted from the 1915 novel by John Buchan and the 1935 film by Alfred Hitchcock. Patrick Barlow wrote the adaptation, based on the original concept by Simon Corble and Nobby Dimon of a two-actor version of the play. The play's concept calls for the entirety of the 1935 adventure film The 39 Steps to be performed with a cast of only four. One actor plays the hero, Richard Hannay, an actress plays the three women with whom he has romantic entanglements, and two other actors play every other character in the show heroes, villains, men, women, children and even the occasional inanimate object. This often requires lightning fast quick-changes and occasionally for them to play multiple characters at once. Thus the film's serious spy story is played mainly for laughs, and the script is
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Stage Tube: On This Day 1/15- The 39 Steps

Today in 2008, The 39 Steps opend at the American Airlines Theatre, where it ran for 771 performances. The play is a farce adapted from the 1915 novel by John Buchan and the 1935 film by Alfred Hitchcock. Patrick Barlow wrote the adaptation, based on the original concept by Simon Corble and Nobby Dimon of a two-actor version of the play. The play's concept calls for the entirety of the 1935 adventure film The 39 Steps to be performed with a cast of only four. One actor plays the hero, Richard Hannay, an actress plays the three women with whom he has romantic entanglements, and two other actors play every other character in the show heroes, villains, men, women, children and even the occasional inanimate object. This often requires lightning fast quick-changes and occasionally for them to play multiple characters at once. Thus the film's serious spy story is played mainly for laughs, and the script is
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Tom Sharpe obituary

Comic novelist in the mould of Wodehouse and Waugh, he was best known for Wilt and Porterhouse Blue

Tom Sharpe, who has died aged 85, was in the great tradition of English comic novelists and his bawdy style and vulgar approach were said to have made bad taste into an art form – like "PG Wodehouse on acid", in the words of one critic. Sharpe did not start writing comic novels until 1971, when he was 43, but once he got going he gained a large readership. He was a huge bestseller whose hardback editions sold like most authors only sell in paperback.

Wilt (1976) introduced perhaps his most popular character: Henry Wilt, a mild-mannered teacher of literature at the fictional Fenland College of Arts and Technology, who gets involved in a murder investigation. Sharpe claimed that the account of teaching day-release apprentice butchers and tradesmen in classes timetabled as "Meat One" and "Plasterers Two
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Stage Tube: On This Day 1/15- The 39 Steps

Today in 2008, The 39 Steps opend at the American Airlines Theatre, where it ran for 771 performances. The play is a farce adapted from the 1915 novel by John Buchan and the 1935 film by Alfred Hitchcock. Patrick Barlow wrote the adaptation, based on the original concept by Simon Corble and Nobby Dimon of a two-actor version of the play. The play's concept calls for the entirety of the 1935 adventure film The 39 Steps to be performed with a cast of only four. One actor plays the hero, Richard Hannay, an actress plays the three women with whom he has romantic entanglements, and two other actors play every other character in the show heroes, villains, men, women, children and even the occasional inanimate object. This often requires lightning fast quick-changes and occasionally for them to play multiple characters at once. Thus the film's serious spy story is played mainly for laughs, and the script is
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

The Forgotten: Black Shirts, Red Faces

  • MUBI
Genuinely fascist films made in democratic countries are agreeably scarce, although Gregory La Cava's Gabriel Over the White House (1933)—or President Jesus Hitler as a friend dubbed it—could certainly qualify, even if it does veer around a lot, almost as if a Hollywood film were trying to avoid committing itself politically. Nominations for other fascist films will be gratefully considered.

Bulldog Drummond was featured in ten novels by a pseudonymous character called "Sapper," (to sap: to slug over the head, British slang). Drummond, an ex-soldier bored by civilian life, advertises for adventure and finds it, as detailed in 1929 Bulldog Drummond with Ronald Colman. This movie largely avoids the racism and jingoistic fervor of the source novels, and seems to play the more brutal moments for laughs, as when Colman exchanges sweet nothings with Joan Bennett while cheerfully throttling Lionel Atwill.

The books' biggest influence in an indirect one:
See full article at MUBI »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: The 39 Steps

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: June 26, 2011

Price: DVD $29.95, Blu-ray $39.95

Studio: Criterion

Robert Donat and Madeleine Carroll simply can't get away from each other in The 39 Steps.

The 1935 film The 39 Steps remains one of filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock’s (Psycho) great thrillers and a mystery filled with the kind of moments that truly defined Hitchcock as “The Master of Suspense.”

The classic movie follows Canadian traveler Richard Hannay (Robert Donat, The Count of Monte Cristo), who stumbles into a spy-filled conspiracy that thrusts him into a hectic chase across the Scottish moors — a chase in which he is both the pursuer and the pursued — as well as into an expected romance with the cool Pamela (Madeleine Carroll, Cafe Society).

Adapted from the 1915 novel by John Buchan, The 39 Steps is one of Hitchcock’s classic wrong-man thrillers, anticipating such later Hitchcock movies as North by Northwest (1959) and, of course, The Wrong Man (1956).

Criterion’s
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Criterion Goes All Out in June 2012 With Hitchcock, Mifune, Soderbergh, Chaplin and Boyle

Anyone who follows the Criterion Collection will note that just about every month of releases is exciting for collectors of classic and important cinema. But some months are just a little bit more special than others. This coming June is going to be even more special. With titles from Alfred Hitchcock, Toshiro Mifune, Charlie Chaplin, Steven Soderbergh (on Spalding Gray) and Danny Boyle, Criterion may have on their hands one of the most exciting months of releases in years. You might as well start saving now. Seriously, just check out the line-up after the jump. The 39 Steps – Bd & DVD The 39 Steps is a heart-racing spy story by Alfred Hitchcock (Psycho), following Richard Hannay (Oscar winner Robert Donat of Goodbye, Mr. Chips), who stumbles into a conspiracy that thrusts him into a hectic chase across the Scottish moors—a chase in which he is both the pursuer and the pursued—as well as into an expected romance with
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Stage Tube: On This Day 1/15- The 39 Steps

Today in 2008, The 39 Steps opend at the American Airlines Theatre, where it ran for 771 performances. The play is a farce adapted from the 1915 novel by John Buchan and the 1935 film by Alfred Hitchcock. Patrick Barlow wrote the adaptation, based on the original concept by Simon Corble and Nobby Dimon of a two-actor version of the play. The play's concept calls for the entirety of the 1935 adventure film The 39 Steps to be performed with a cast of only four. One actor plays the hero, Richard Hannay, an actress plays the three women with whom he has romantic entanglements, and two other actors play every other character in the show heroes, villains, men, women, children and even the occasional inanimate object. This often requires lightning fast quick-changes and occasionally for them to play multiple characters at once. Thus the film's serious spy story is played mainly for laughs, and the script is
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Don Sharp obituary

Director of eerily atmospheric Hammer horror films including The Kiss of the Vampire

In 1962, Don Sharp was a minor ex-actor, hack writer and jobbing director of British B-films, when he was offered the chance to make a gothic horror movie for Hammer, "the studio that dripped blood". In the event, The Kiss of the Vampire (1963) rescued both Sharp, who has died aged 90, and Hammer from the doldrums.

The studio, which had suffered several expensive flops, turned to Sharp due to his experience in low-budget film-making. Sharp, who claimed to have never watched a horror movie, let alone directed one, quickly steeped himself in the Hammer style by spending a week or so watching past successes, principally those directed by Terence Fisher and Freddie Francis. The Kiss of the Vampire, made with a smaller budget and an unstarry cast, recruited mostly from television, scored at the box office, and Sharp became associated with horror movies thereafter.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Don Sharp obituary

Director of eerily atmospheric Hammer horror films including The Kiss of the Vampire

In 1962, Don Sharp was a minor ex-actor, hack writer and jobbing director of British B-films, when he was offered the chance to make a gothic horror movie for Hammer, "the studio that dripped blood". In the event, The Kiss of the Vampire (1963) rescued both Sharp, who has died aged 89, and Hammer from the doldrums.

The studio, which had suffered several expensive flops, turned to Sharp due to his experience in low-budget film-making. Sharp, who claimed to have never watched a horror movie, let alone directed one, quickly steeped himself in the Hammer style by spending a week or so watching past successes, principally those directed by Terence Fisher and Freddie Francis. The Kiss of the Vampire, made with a smaller budget and an unstarry cast, recruited mostly from television, scored at the box office, and Sharp became associated with horror movies thereafter.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

My favourite film: The 39 Steps

In our writers' favourite film series, Saptarshi Ray gets caught up in Alfred Hitchcock's 1935 web of intrigue

• Not thrilled? Don't leave us in suspense, post your own review – or engage in some covert operations below

The 39 Steps was my first Hitchcock film. I saw it when I was about 13, with a movie-buff uncle on a battered old black-and-white TV set, on a trip to India. Sitting in the clammy heat and darkness that night, praying there wouldn't be a power cut as we were transported from West Bengal to the Scottish moors, it was the first time I grasped the full extent of cinema's escapist power.

It also inspired my appreciation of Hitchcock as a master film-maker – an artisan and sculptor, with a healthy dose of rogue, rolled into one; a man who crafted stories that blended technical ingenuity with aesthetic beauty without you even realising it.

The plot
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Thoughts on... The 39 Steps (1935)

The 39 Steps, 1935.

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

Starring Robert Donat, Madeleine Carroll, Lucie Mannheim, Godfrey Tearle, Peggy Ashcroft and Wylie Watson.

Synopsis:

Wrongfully accused of the murder of a counterespionage agent, a man (Robert Donat) must go on the run to clear his name whilst preventing a spy ring from stealing top secret information.

"Clear out, Hannay! They'll get you next..."

With these words on her lips and a knife in her back, Annabella Smith, spy for hire, dies. Richard Hannay (Robert Donat), the man who put her up for the night, is now in mortal danger. From here on, The 39 Steps continues to shift up gears into a breathlessly paced thriller, often imitated, never bettered.

Crucially, Hitchcock doesn’t cheat with rapid-fire edits to get the audiences’ pulses pumping. Scenes are played out to their natural length, teasing out real tension from everyday occurences, planting us so firmly in Hannay
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

From old books to big bucks: 8 vintage heroes who deserve a modern revival

With the next Sherlock Holmes movie on the horizon, David looks at a few other literary heroes that deserve a fresh chance on the big screen…

Classic suspense heroes are getting a lot of Hollywood attention at the moment. Sherlock Holmes: A Game Of Shadows will be released in December, and Robert Downey Jr wants to similarly reinvent Perry Mason, while Miss Marple will apparently turn into Jennifer Garner.

Meanwhile, The Saint, as played by James Purefoy, will return to the small-screen in a TV movie called The Saint In New Orleans. With this in mind, here are a few other classic characters that could be similarly adapted.

Sexton Blake

Originally a Holmes pretender, this character evolved into a hybrid of Holmes, James Bond and Indiana Jones, going on to become the most documented fictional character in the history of the English language, with over two thousand stories and novels published.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Stuntman To Climb The 39 Steps

  • WENN
Stuntman To Climb The 39 Steps
Veteran stuntman Vic Armstrong is to make his feature film directorial debut by remaking Alfred Hitchcock classic The 39 Steps.

The filmmaker, who is most famous for stunts in films like Raiders of the Lost Ark and Patriot Games, is set to tackle the John Buchan novel in 2011, according to website MovieHole.net.

According to imdb.com, Robert Towne is also planning a remake of the movie, which has hit the big screen three times since Hitchcock's 1935 classic, starring Robert Donat as man-on-the-run Richard Hannay.

Brits Kenneth More and Robert Powell have also played Hannay in 1959 and 1978 remakes. And Rupert Penry-Jones starred in a TV movie version of Buchan's story in 2008.

Theater Review: ‘The 39 Steps’ is Frolicsome, Hollow Hitchcock

Chicago – The stage may is noticeably stripped, and the absence of technical advancement well-viewed. But the brass creativity emanating from “The 39 Steps”, the rollicking adaptation of Alfred Hitchcock’s quieted film, is consummately endowed. In a certain albeit undeniable sense, the Master of Suspense’s screen canon has always been ripe for the satirical plucking. Permeated with harrowing plot twists, forlorn femme fatales, and disoriented- though always dignified- heroes, Hitchcockian thrillers offer the sort of dramatic abundance about which most Broadway producers can only daydream.

Play Rating: 3.0/5.0

Both John Buchan’s original 1915 novel and Hitchcock’s 1935 screen adaptation followed a quick-paced, English-flavored thriller conceit. The narratives employed heady espionage, boiling international conflict, and the staple of mistaken identity. The stage conversion of “The 39 Steps”, adapted by Patrick Barlow and with conceptualization by Simon Corble and Nobby Dimon, renders much of the same recipe. But slapstick and schtick are the go-to ingredients here.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Slow March to War: An Advance Review of PBS' "The 39 Steps" on "Masterpiece Classic"

Alfred Hitchcock's 1935 thriller The 39 Steps took the action of John Buchan's World War I espionage novel and transported it forward in time to the 1930s, where the world was on the brink of yet another global war. As with Buchan's novel, Hitchcock's 39 Steps traced the steps taken by reluctant hero and former spy Richard Hannay as he receives a coded message from a spy who dies in his London apartment and who then finds himself enmeshed in a dangerous conspiracy that puts his life and that of everyone he comes in contact with in jeopardy. The film, while a gripping masterpiece of intrigue and suspense, took several liberties with the underlying material and a new version of The 39 Steps--starring Spooks' Rupert Penry-Jones--goes back to the source material to craft a new adaptation that is much more in line with Buchan's original novel than Hitchcock's film. Penry-Jones
See full article at Televisionary »

Auckland Theater Company Presents The 39 Steps 2/12-3/7

Auckland Theatre Company in association with the Court Theatre presents The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan, adapted by Ross Gumbley. 12 February - 07 March 2009 They say there are no more heroes. They haven't met Richard Hannay yet. Director: Ross Gumbley Starring: Lisa Chappell, Stephen Papps, Cameron Rhodes Design: Tony Geddes, Elizabeth Whiting, Brad Gledhill Four fearless actors play 139 roles in 100 madcap minutes in this inventive adaptation of John Buchan's classic British spy thriller.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

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