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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 166 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


‘American Gods 1×08: Come to Jesus’ Review

20 June 2017 10:01 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Ricky Whittle, Ian McShane, Emily Browning, Crispin Glover, Bruce Langley, Yetide Badaki, Orlando Jones, Pablo Schreiber, Peter Stormare, Kristin Chenoweth, Gillian Anderson, Cloris Leachman | Created by Neil Gaiman | Developed for TV by Bryan Fuller

While there may be a lot of focus on Twin Peaks, there is of course one more show that refuses to be ignored. The American Gods finale is here, and we finally get to meet Easter (Kristin Chenoweth). More importantly the Gods have a face-off that may set the scene for a war in Season two.

Mr. Wednesday (Ian McShane) and Shadow Moon (Ricky Whittle) arrive at a party to try to recruit Ostara, also known as Easter. With Laura (Emily Browning) and Mad Sweeney (Pablo Shreiber) also arriving looking for help with resurrection, it doesn’t take long for a few newer Gods to join the party.

Finally seeing Kristin Chenoweth debut in American Gods, »

- Paul Metcalf

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American Gods "Come To Jesus" Recap

19 June 2017 6:50 AM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

Courtesy of Starz

Well, here it is: the eighth episode. The season finale of Neil Gaiman’s novel turned television series. So, without further ado, here’s what happened on the American Gods season finale.

As Shadow and Wednesday sit back in silk robes, waiting for the completion of Mr. Nancy’s specially tailored suits, he tells them the story of a specific queen: Bilquis. He tells them of her reign in her land, how she moved throughout the ages, adapting to the changing eras and taking her followers through her sexual exploits. His story culminates on how weakened she is after Isis destroys her altar and is given her power back due to an arrangement with Technical Boy.

Upon completion of their suits, Shadow and Wednesday arrive in Kentucky at their next stop; the next God who’s allegiance they need. Walking into a colorful and vibrant party, the two of them meet Ostara, »

- Anthony Esteves

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'American Gods' Finale: What That Final Moment Means For Season Two

18 June 2017 7:02 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

[Warning: this story contains spoilers through the season finale of Starz's American Gods, "Come to Jesus."]

The final episode of the inaugural season of American Gods, spearheaded by Bryan Fuller and Michael Green for Starz, ended just short of a major milestone from the Neil Gaiman novel on which it's based.

All season long, viewers followed the journey of Shadow Moon (Ricky Whittle), a recently released ex-con who fell into an otherworldly pursuit following the death of his wife Laura (Emily Browning). Shortly after the funeral, Shadow embarked on a road trip across middle America alongside »

- Josh Wigler

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How Editors of ‘The Crown,’ ‘American Gods,’ and ‘This Is Us’ Achieved Emotional Power

16 June 2017 2:23 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

There was more than enough narrative complexity for editors to tackle in Emmy contenders “The Crown,” “American Gods,” “This Is Us,” “Fargo,” and “Five Came Back.” But through skill and finesse, they helped make these shows compelling and relevant by cutting through the multiple strands of history, mythology, melodrama, and black comedy.

The Crown” focused on the public and private personas of Queen Elizabeth II (Claire Foy) in post-war England; “American Gods” explored how Old and New Gods fight for attention in modern society; “This Is Us” chose a non-linear structure to show the influence of the past on millennial siblings; “Fargo” dealt with twin brothers (Ewan McGregor) in a third season of absurd crime shenanigans; and “Five Came Back” revealed how the World War II propaganda campaign changed the lives of directors Frank Capra, John Ford, John Huston, George Stevens, and William Wyler.

The Crown

In “Hyde Park Corner, »

- Bill Desowitz

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The 5 New TV Dramas That Deserve Emmy Attention

16 June 2017 7:30 AM, PDT | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

American Gods” (Starz)“You can’t weave the stories that are necessary for belief unless you have a personality,” Mr. Wednesday tells Shadow Moon. And personality is definitely not lacking on “American Gods.” After building a devoted fan base with Neil Gaiman’s 2001 novel, this gritty story of war between the old gods and the new had big shoes to fill. Starz has succeeded with its impressive new series starring Ricky Whittle, Gillian Anderson, Pablo Schreiber, Emily Browning, and a superb Ian McShane. Set in modern times, the series follows Shadow Moon (Whittle) and Mr. Wednesday (McShane) as they reluctantly team up to wrestle power back from the gods that are worshipped today: technology, media, money, and war. Dreamlike visuals combined with some perfectly camp performances make for a surrealist fantasy reminiscent of a crossover between “Game of Thrones” and co-creator Bryan Fuller’s gone-too-soon “Hannibal.” —Briana Rodriguez “The Crown »

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‘American Gods 1×07: A Prayer for Mad Sweeney’ Review

14 June 2017 10:01 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Ricky Whittle, Ian McShane, Emily Browning, Crispin Glover, Bruce Langley, Yetide Badaki, Orlando Jones, Pablo Schreiber, Peter Stormare, Kristin Chenoweth, Gillian Anderson, Cloris Leachman | Created by Neil Gaiman | Developed for TV by Bryan Fuller

While the Gods are busy fighting among themselves, the teaming up of Laura Moon (Emily Browning) and Mad Sweeney (Pablo Schreiber) has been an interesting side story in American Gods. Today we get to learn more about the angry Irishman and his surprising connection to Laura.

While on the trail of Shadow (Ricky Whittle) and possible resurrection, Laura travels with Mad Sweeney. Looking back into his past we get to see just how he made his way to America, and his connection to Laura’s family which may explain his connection with her.

In the flashback, we are introduced to Essie MacGowan, also played by Emily Browning. A believer in the Leprechaun she often leaves »

- Paul Metcalf

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20 New Movies That Will Define This Year in Indie Cinema, From ‘The Big Sick’ to ‘A Ghost Story’

14 June 2017 7:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

This month’s BAMcinemaFest isn’t just for New York cinephiles, as the annual festival routinely rolls out a slate that includes the year’s best indie offerings, giving many of them a major boost before they roll out theatrical runs. This year is no different, as the Brooklyn-based event will play home to a slew of festival favorites, including a hefty dose of Sundance’s buzziest titles and some big-time SXSW winners and everything in between, most of them bound for a release in a theater (hopefully) near you.

Read More: Richard Linklater’s ‘The Last Detail’ Sequel ‘Last Flag Flying’ to Open New York Film Festival

As we look ahead to the rest of the year in indie cinema, these 20 titles stand out as some of the best and the brightest still left on the calendar. Fortunately, we’ve got plenty of information on each of them to satiate you. »

- Kate Erbland and Eric Kohn

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Netflix's A Series Of Unfortunate Events Adds Nathan Fillion

12 June 2017 11:30 PM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

The first book of the popular series, Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events: The Bad Beginning, hit the shelves in September of 1999. Five years later, Paramount Pictures released the film A Series of Unfortunate Events. This film starred Jim Carrey, Liam Aiken, Emily Browning, Kara/Shelby Hoffman and Jude Law. Fast forward to 2017 when Netflix released the series starring Neil Patrick Harris as the vile Count Olaf, Malina Weissman as Violet Baudelaire, Louis Hynes as Klaus Baudelaire and Presley Smith as Sunny Baudelaire. The show did well enough to be renewed for a second season.

With that news, we knew that new actors/actresses would be added to the show. Thanks to The Wrap, we know that the latest star to join the show is Nathan Fillion.  He is set to play Lemony Snicket's brother. Along with Fillion, Tony Hale, Sara Rue, Lucy Punch and Roger Bart have »

- Emmanuel Gomez

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‘American Gods’: Emily Browning Pulls Double Duty in “Prayer for Mad Sweeney”

11 June 2017 6:58 PM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

One of Bryan Fuller and Michael Green’s favorite “Coming to America” stories in Neil Gaiman’s American Gods was the tale of Essie Tregowan, a woman from Cornwall whose unfortunate fate prompted her to lead a life of con artistry, thievery, and prostitution. In translating the story for the show, it became a great way to incorporate actress Emily Browning and offer a parallel to Laura Moon’s journey while giving the leprechaun Mad Sweeney an origin story. Since “Prayer for Mad Sweeney” is also the penultimate episode of Season 1, it comes with a major revelation. Fans may … »

- Nick Romano

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American Gods Recap: Hard-Luck Story

11 June 2017 6:55 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Need to catch up? Check out last week’s American Gods recap here.

No, You’Re feeling guilty for dismissing American Gods‘ Mad Sweeney as a stereotypical drunk-‘n’-belligerent member of the fightin’ Irish.

In this week’s episode of the Starz fantasy drama, we find out a bit about the leprechaun’s back story, including why he’s drawn to Laura Moon. Much of the explanation comes wrapped in an extended Coming to America story about Essie MacGowan, whom book readers will recognize as the Essie Tregowan of Neil Gaiman’s novel.

Read on for the highlights of “A Prayer for Mad Sweeney. »

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American Gods episode 8 review: Come To Jesus

11 June 2017 1:16 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ron Hogan Jun 19, 2017

American Gods season 1 concludes with another stunning-looking episode. Here's our finale review...

Easter is a very strange holiday, even by holiday standards. Christianity mashed together with pagan rituals, bunnies and crucifixion and chocolate? In many ways, it's an example of just what kind of services the New Gods can offer the Old. It's a temptation to continue to exist, to feel something of the old worship. Sure, you might have to share your holiday with about a hundred different incarnations of Jesus, but for Easter (Kristin Chenoweth), it's a pretty good bargain she's made with Media. She gets remembered, and honoured after a fashion, and she gets to have a big party with a lot of new friends who won't have much use for her indoor pool.

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Unfortunately for Easter, she's going to have a couple of party crashers. One's an old friend trying to recruit her to be his Queen and fight alongside him in the upcoming war. The other's a leprechaun bringing a dead girl to a party for a bunch of people who have already come back to life. Neither is particularly welcome, because while Wednesday is trying to seduce Easter and Sweeney and Laura talk about just what God made her die, Media is coming to pay a visit to her dearest friend in full Scarlett O'Hara glory.

Kristin Chenoweth is just a little ray of sunshine, but like the sun, she can warm, and she can burn. She's a gifted comic actress, and she's a Broadway star for a reason. She's magnetic, and she holds her own on screen despite making Emily Browning look tall. She's a pint-sized powerhouse, and she emotes so well with her features without succumbing to theatre's tendency to have to play big to get to the back of the room. She goes big, but it's appropriately big, because she's playing a larger than life character.

As Media says, Easter has made an arrangement to share her holiday, and like Vulcan, she's adapted to the way things are as a form of religious Darwinism. She's willing to host a parade of Jesuses to her home to celebrate their shared holiday, and she might even be able to pretend that she likes it, but when Easter lets loose and shows her true power, bringing spring and then taking spring away, it's clear that she's missed being herself. Easter is more than bunnies and sugary treats; Easter is rebirth and death, and it's clear that she's missed exercising her power in a meaningful way.

It's such a satisfying moment, and Chenoweth, Gillian Anderson, and Ian McShane play it so, so well. The New Gods have a certain skill set, and certainly they can work with the Old Gods and bring them into the modern world, but it's not the same as being actually worshiped; the New Gods provide distractions and fill time, but there's nothing satisfying about what they offer people or Gods. Certainly, it might sustain the lucky deity, like Vulcan, but it's clear that Wednesday wants something more like the old ways, and Easter is just the queen to provide it.

The episode is an interesting combination of elements. Our introduction to Bilquis has already been made, but we don't hear her story until Nancy tells it. It's as tragic as you might imagine, given that none of the Gods have had an easy time in America and she's a very old god who has long since been forgotten until she is rescued by Technical Boy. Easter's house is beautiful, and it's shown in a very idyllic style; it's all cuddly bunnies and candy colours, at least until Wednesday goes into his long discussion of his many names and calls down lightning to kill several of the Men In Black and make a sacrifice to Easter.

There are so many shifts in that scene, particularly in colour saturation and visuals, that the fact that they pulled it off and made it look so good is just a testament to the skill of the special effects team and a keen eye for cinematography and editing. The shift from Easter's brightness to the clouds of Odin is perfectly done, and the shift from Odin's stormy skies to the glory of full summer is deft, and Floria Sigismondi's camera makes it absolutely sing and pop. The look of rapture on Kristin Chenoweth's face, and the look of satisfaction on Wednesday's, only makes the scene that much better, particularly when Easter decides to take away the beauty that she'd given, robbing the world of spring and holding it for ransom.

It's a stunning moment of triumph for Wednesday. He gets Easter on his side, he puts on a show of power for the New Gods and the people of the world, and he finally wins over Shadow's belief. Unfortunately, Sweeney and Laura are still there, and Dead Wife just might have enough ammunition in her clip to take Wednesday down and scuttle the plans before they can even really begin by wrenching Shadow away from his benefactor. His biggest triumph, and his ruin is standing behind him on a balcony, clearing her throat. A god, who might just be brought low by a dead girl too stubborn to stay dead.

That's the magic of American Gods, and why Michael Green and Bryan Fuller's adaptation is so brilliant. The machinations of these powerful beings can be toppled by a stubborn ghoul who just wants to be back with her husband and to stop spitting up maggots and drawing flies. Without people, even the most powerful of gods is doomed, no matter how well they adapt to using a smartphone.

Us Correspondent Ron Hogan was very impressed by Easter's palatial Kentucky estate. He lives in Kentucky, and hasn't seen very many houses that look quite that spectacular. Find more by Ron daily at PopFi. »

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American Gods series 1 episode 7 review: A Prayer For Mad Sweeney

11 June 2017 12:25 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ron Hogan Jun 12, 2017

Emily Browning continues to impress in American Gods. Here's our review of the latest episode...

This review contains spoilers.

1.7 A Prayer For Mad Sweeney

It’s strange to think that Emily Browning might just become the breakout star of American Gods, but here we are. You’d expect someone like Ricky Whittle to blow up, or perhaps Corbin Bernsen will get that career renaissance I spoke about last week. Maybe Omid Abtahi will translate the beatific charm of Salim into a big career, or Chris Obi will become a household name after displaying both calculated menace, kindness, and comic timing, usually in the same scene. And yet, Emily Browning, who played the lead in several huge-budget movies, is poised to make a career leap with performances like her most recent in A Prayer For Mad Sweeney.

The tale of Essie McGowan (Emily Browning playing a second role »

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‘American Gods’: Pablo Schreiber on Why He Was Hesitant to Sign on, Finding the Look, and More

11 June 2017 10:23 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

From showrunners Bryan Fuller and Michael Green and adapted from the best-selling book by Neil Gaiman, the Starz series American Gods weaves a provocative tale of faith and belief, or our lack thereof, unlike anything that’s ever been on TV before. When Shadow Moon (Ricky Whittle) is released from prison following the death of his wife (Emily Browning), he meets the mysterious Mr. Wednesday (Ian McShane), with whom he makes a deal that will change the course of his entire life. As he finds himself in the center of a world that he struggles to make sense of, … »

- Christina Radish

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‘American Gods’: How They Crafted Superhero TV for Adults

8 June 2017 12:30 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In new television series “American Gods,” adapted by showrunners Bryan Fuller and Michael Green from Neil Gaiman’s 2001 novel about the epic battle between the Old and New Gods, we have a superhero fantasy for adults. In this Starz drama, the Old are obsessed with faith, the New with branding.

Costume designer Suttirat Larlarb and cinematographer Darran Tiernan felt they needed to ground the Gods in a believable reality before going wild with visual eye candy. That meant using protagonist Shadow Moon (Ricky Whittle) as an anchor. He’s a former convict with a crisis of faith, who’s recruited to protect con artist Mr. Wednesday/Odin (Ian McShane).

Dressing the Old and New Gods

“I was harboring a low level anxiety about the project because, from the outset, we’re given a host of characters who exist in reality but are supernatural,” said Larlarb. “And they have to exist among living, »

- Bill Desowitz

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American Gods: Is the Starz TV Series Cancelled or Renewed for Season Two?

6 June 2017 12:50 PM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

Vulture Watch: Will the television ratings gods show mercy? Has the American Gods TV show been cancelled or renewed for a second season on Starz? The television vulture is watching all the latest cancellation and renewal news, so this page is the place to track the status of American Gods season two. Bookmark it, or subscribe for the latest updates. Remember, the television vulture is watching your shows. Are you?  What's This TV Show About? An Americana fantasy drama series on the Starz premium cable channel, American Gods stars Ricky Whittle, Ian McShane, Emily Browning, Pablo Schreiber, Yetide Badaki, Bruce Langley, Crispin Glover, Orlando Jones, Gillian Anderson, Kristin Chenoweth, Jonathan Tucker, Cloris Leachman, Peter Stormare, Chris Obi, Demore Barnes, Corbin Bernsen, and Mousa Kraish. Finally free after completing his prison sentence, when Shadow Moon (Whittle) first encounters Mr. Wednesday, a storm blows in »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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‘American Gods 1×06: A Murder of Gods’ Review

6 June 2017 10:01 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Ricky Whittle, Ian McShane, Emily Browning, Crispin Glover, Bruce Langley, Yetide Badaki, Orlando Jones, Pablo Schreiber, Peter Stormare, Kristin Chenoweth, Gillian Anderson, Cloris Leachman | Created by Neil Gaiman | Developed for TV by Bryan Fuller

In American Gods last week, we got to see the two sides of the upcoming war. This week Mr. Wednesday (Ian McShane) needs to recuperate, but will his chosen hiding place be the right one?

On the run from the New Gods, Mr Wednesday takes Shadow (Ricky Whittle) to one of his oldest friends, Vulcan (Corbin Bernsen). While this is going on Laura (Emily Browning) and Mad Sweeney (Pablo Shreiber) go on a road trip of their own with new friend Salim (Omid Abtahi).

This week’s American Gods starts off with a not so subtle look at Christianity, and Jesus. It is interesting that he should show up helping Mexicans trying to find their way over the border, »

- Paul Metcalf

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American Gods “A Murder Of Gods” Recap

5 June 2017 8:35 AM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

Courtesy of Starz

The episode opens to a group of immigrants south of the border looking to make their way to the United States. The group makes a swim across a river and onto the other side. One of the immigrants, struggling to make it across, is assisted by what seems to be a Jesus-like figure. When it seems there is a holy glow behind him, they quickly learn that the glow is coming from a number of SUVs parked, facing them. Within moments, the immigrants are fired upon and killed by gun-toting, rosary bead-wearing ranchers with “Thy Kingdom Come” etched into their weapons. A moment that easily points out the hypocrisy of alleged Christians who are so willing to kill without any hesitation.

With the events of last week, we have two sets of beings hitting the road for Kentucky. Shadow and Wednesday, escaping the violet end to the »

- Anthony Esteves

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American Gods episode 6 review: A Murder Of Gods

5 June 2017 12:29 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ron Hogan Jun 5, 2017

The casting continues to be top notch on American Gods, which straddles the line of dark comedy brilliantly...

This review contains spoilers.

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1.6 A Murder Of Gods

There's something of an art to splitting the main cast of a television show into two groups. I've seen it done very poorly, and I've seen it done very well. Some shows, like Game Of Thrones, seem to deliberately break their episodes up into little segments and chunks, so viewers get to spend five minutes here, five minutes there, and only occasionally get a full-on episode in one location with one or two major characters. American Gods, being a travelogue at its core, has two groups of characters on the road, and they're two groups that function very well separately from one another. »

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‘American Gods 1×05: Lemon Scented You’ Review

30 May 2017 10:01 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Ricky Whittle, Ian McShane, Emily Browning, Crispin Glover, Bruce Langley, Yetide Badaki, Orlando Jones, Pablo Schreiber, Peter Stormare, Kristin Chenoweth, Gillian Anderson, Cloris Leachman | Created by Neil Gaiman | Developed for TV by Bryan Fuller

After last week’s flashback episode American Gods finally delivers us with the big confrontation of new and old. The question is, just what will the New Gods want out of the meeting, and where will Shadow (Ricky Whittle) fit in? This week Shadow has a reunion with Laura (Emily Browning) and it doesn’t go well. When he and Mr. Wednesday (Ian McShane) are arrested for their bank heist, it seems the visit to the police station is a setup for a much different meeting.

This episode is interesting because not only do Laura and Shadow get to talk over her what happened before her death, but we also get to catch up with the other Gods. »

- Paul Metcalf

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‘American Gods': Neil Gaiman on Changes from the Book & the Status of His Sequel

30 May 2017 8:29 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

From showrunners Bryan Fuller and Michael Green, and adapted from the best-selling book by Neil Gaiman, the Starz series American Gods weaves a provocative tale of faith and belief, or our lack thereof, unlike anything that’s ever been on TV before. When Shadow Moon (Ricky Whittle) is released from prison following the death of his wife (Emily Browning), he meets the mysterious Mr. Wednesday (Ian McShane), with whom he makes a deal that will change the course of his entire life. As he finds himself in the center of a world that he struggles to make sense of, … »

- Christina Radish

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 166 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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