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Notes On The Landlord And Lee Grant

Hal Ashby’s The Landlord, made in 1970, is probably the best movie of the 1970s not to be widely known by younger audiences, and even by some older audiences whose appreciation of the last great era of American moviemaking needs to be expanded beyond go-to classics like The Godfather and Chinatown and Taxi Driver. It’s Ashby’s first directorial effort, after work as assistant editor and chief film editor on The Diary of Anne Frank, The Cincinnati Kid and In the Heat of the Night, and it finds Ashby delighting in the freedom of fashioning experimental rules of editorial and visual expression in the process of translating a script from Bill Gunn (Ganja and Hess), based on Kristin Hunter’s novel, into what stands today as one of the funniest, most honest, cogent and probing explorations of race and American race relations in movie history. We had it on
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Trailers for New Restorations of Mike Nichols’ ‘The Graduate’ and Clint Eastwood’s ‘Unforgiven’

A pair of Oscar winners have recently undergone new restorations ahead of theatrical releases. While one can’t get much better than The Criterion Collection edition of The Graduate, a new 50th anniversary 4K restoration will be coming to U.K. cinemas this month and a new trailer has landed for Mike Nichols‘ coming-of-age masterpiece led by Dustin Hoffman.

Following that, there’s a new trailer for Clint Eastwood‘s Best Picture-winning western Unforgiven, which turns 25 this summer. With the restoration premiering as part of the Cannes Classics line-up, it’ll fittingly come to France first. The new restoration of The Graduate hits U.K. theaters starting June 23 while Unforgiven returns to theaters in France two days prior. Stay tuned for updates on U.S. releases and check out both trailers below.

Benjamin Braddock (Dustin Hoffman) has just finished college and is already lost in a sea of confusion as
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The Mephisto Waltz

Jacqueline Bisset’s in a heck of a fix. Her hubby Alan Alda has been seduced by promises of fame and fortune from creepy concert genius Curt Jurgens, and is responding to weird overtures from Curt’s daughter Barbara Parkins. The pianist’s mansion is stuffed with occult books, and he displays an unhealthy interest in Alda’s piano-ready hands. Do you think the innocent young couple could be in a diabolical tight spot? Nah, nothing to worry about here.

The Mephisto Waltz

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1971 / Color /1:85 widescreen / 115 min. / Street Date April 18, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Alan Alda, Jacqueline Bisset, Barbara Parkins, Brad(ford) Dillman, William Windom, Kathleen Widdoes, Pamelyn Ferdin, Curt Jurgens, Curt Lowens, Kiegh Diegh, Berry Kroeger, Walter Brooke, Frank Campanella.

Cinematography: William W. Spencer

Film Editor: Richard Brockway

Original Music: Jerry Goldsmith

Written by Ben Maddow from a novel by Fred Mustard Stewart

Produced
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Framed

In the 1970s crime films morphed into sadistic vigilante fantasies about tough-guy heroes avenging terrible crimes against their families. Veteran noir director Phil Karlson directed the bruiser’s bruiser Joe Don Baker in a standard tale of violent vengeance, with the violence factor given an extra bloody boost.

Framed

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1975 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 106 min. / Street Date February 28, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Joe Don Baker, Conny Van Dyke, John Marley, Gabriel Dell,, Brock Peters, John Larch, Warren J. Kemmerling, Walter Brooke, Paul Mantee, H.B. Haggerty, Roy Jenson.

Cinematography: Jack A. Marta

Film Editor: Harry W. Gerstad

Stunts: Carey Loftin, Gil Perkins, Buddy Joe Hooker

Original Music: Pat Williams

Written by Mort Briskin from a book by Art Powers & Mike Misenheimer

Produced by Joel Briskin, Mort Briskin

Directed by Phil Karlson

Time for another curiosity review, of a grindhouse gut-basher from the 1970s — a subgenre I avoided when new.
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The Graduate

What can you say to such success? Mike Nichols and Buck Henry's sex satire defined 'the generation gap' for the sixties. Dustin Hoffman sprang forward from obscurity and Katharine Ross was the object of California desire. Anne Bancroft's Mrs. Robinson freed the image of the 'complicated woman' from the clutches of the Production Code Stone Age. The broad comedy scores with every joke, and there's a truth beneath all the odd things that ought not to work. The Graduate Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 800 1967 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 106 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date February 23, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Anne Bancroft, Dustin Hoffman, Katharine Ross, William Daniels, Murray Hamilton, Elizabeth Wilson, Buck Henry, Brian Avery, Walter Brooke, Norman Fell, Alice Ghostley, Marion Lorne, Eddra Gale, Richard Dreyfuss, Mike Farrell, Elisabeth Fraser, Donald F. Glut, Elaine May, Lainie Miller, Ben Murphy. Cinematography Robert Surtees Film Editor Sam O'Steen Production Design Richard Sylbert
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Review: The Landlord

This is the Pure Movies review of The Landlord, directed by Hal Ashby and starring Beau Bridges, Lee Grant, Diana Sands, Pearl Bailey, Walter Brooke and Louis Gossett Jr. Reviewed by Suki Ferguson for @puremovies The Landlord is a real race-relations curio; a social comedy that atomizes racial tension in a post-Sixties Brooklyn neighbourhood. When the decade of youthful cultural and political awakening ends, tensions and readjustments soon follow, and here they are deftly exhibited through the prism of big city gentrification.
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Exploring The Twilight Zone, Episode #131: "A Short Drink From a Certain Fountain"

We resume our coverage of Season 5 of the original series with an episode about the fountain of life -- which seems fitting for the second day of a new year. The Twilight Zone, Episode #131: "A Short Drink From a Certain Fountain" (original air date Dec. 13, 1963) The Plot: Elderly Harmon Gordon (Patrick O'Neal) has a much-younger wife who constantly reminds him that he's 40 years older. Driven to the point of despair and contemplating suicide, Harmon begs his younger brother Raymond (Walter Brooke), a doctor, to inject him with an experimental serum that has reversed the aging process for some test subjects (animals) -- and killed others. Very reluctantly, Raymond agrees, but the serum has an unexpected result for its first human...
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