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TCM's Pride Month Series Continues with Movies Somehow Connected to Lgbt Talent

Turner Classic Movies continues with its Gay Hollywood presentations tonight and tomorrow morning, June 8–9. Seven movies will be shown about, featuring, directed, or produced by the following: Cole Porter, Lorenz Hart, Farley Granger, John Dall, Edmund Goulding, W. Somerset Maughan, Clifton Webb, Montgomery Clift, Raymond Burr, Charles Walters, DeWitt Bodeen, and Harriet Parsons. (One assumes that it's a mere coincidence that gay rumor subjects Cary Grant and Tyrone Power are also featured.) Night and Day (1946), which could also be considered part of TCM's homage to birthday girl Alexis Smith, who would have turned 96 today, is a Cole Porter biopic starring Cary Grant as a posh, heterosexualized version of Porter. As the warning goes, any similaries to real-life people and/or events found in Night and Day are a mere coincidence. The same goes for Words and Music (1948), a highly fictionalized version of the Richard Rodgers-Lorenz Hart musical partnership.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

DVD Review: "The House Across The Lake" (1954) From Hammer Films; UK Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Tim Greaves

As British noir crime dramas of the Fifties go, The House Across the Lake (1954) is probably as good an example as you could hope to dip into. The tale unfolds in flashback, related by our main protagonist to another character (precisely who is not revealed until the final reel), is embroidered with expositional narration and, though clichéd and not in the least unpredictable, delivers atmosphere by the barrel.

The film is an early entry on the CV of writer-director Ken Hughes (the arguable highpoints of whose career, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and Cromwell, remain perennial favourites, whilst his latter-day offerings, Night School and Sextette, are best brushed under the proverbial carpet). Hughes scripted The House Across the Lake from his own source novel, “High Wray”, and also commandeered the director’s chair. Nowadays understandably marketed as a Hammer film, it’s actually the fruit of the company’s earlier incarnation Exclusive Films.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

‘The Woman in Green,’ a classic Sherlock Holmes film

The Woman in Green

Written by Bertram Millhauser

Directed by Roy William Neill

USA, 1945

The Woman in Green begins with a mystery Scotland Yard cannot solve. Several women have turned up murdered around London, all with a finger severed off. Stumped by who the killer could be, Inspector Gregson (Matthew Boulton) calls on Sherlock Holmes (Basil Rathbone) and Dr. Watson (Nigel Bruce) to solve the case. Holmes and Watson soon discover that the deaths are far more than the work of a lone serial killer, but part of a diabolical plot involving hypnotism and the ever-evil Professor Moriarty (Henry Daniell).

Part of a series of 14 Sherlock Holmes films produced between 1939 and 1946 (by 20th Century Fox and then Universal), The Woman in Green plays with hypnotism as a way for Moriarty to gain control. Moriarty’s partner-in-crime is Lydia (Hillary Brooke), a hypnotism enthusiast. Together, they hypnotize wealthy men to believe
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Once a Star Always a Star: Turner's Scandals on TCM

Lana Turner movies: Scandal and more scandal Lana Turner is Turner Classic Movies’ "Summer Under the Stars" star today, Saturday, August 10, 2013. I’m a little — or rather, a lot — late in the game posting this article, but there are still three Lana Turner movies left. You can see Turner get herself embroiled in scandal right now, in Douglas Sirk’s Imitation of Life (1959), both the director and the star’s biggest box-office hit. More scandal follows in Mark Robson’s Peyton Place (1957), the movie that earned Lana Turner her one and only Academy Award nomination. And wrapping things up is George Sidney’s lively The Three Musketeers (1948), with Turner as the ruthless, heartless, remorseless — but quite elegant — Lady de Winter. Based on Fannie Hurst’s novel and a remake of John M. Stahl’s 1934 melodrama about mother love, class disparities, racism, and good cooking, Imitation of Life was shown on
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Africa Screams – A Look Back at 1949

The St. Louis Globe-Democrat is a monthly newspaper run by Steve DeBellis, a well know St. Louis historian, and it’s the largest one-man newspaper in the world. The concept of The Globe is that there is an old historic headline, then all the articles in that issue are written as though it’s the year that the headline is from. It’s an unusual concept but the paper is now in its 25th successful year! Steve and I collaborated recently on an all-Vincent Price issue of The Globe in 2011 and he has asked me to write a regular monthly movie-related column. This month’s St. Louis Globe-Democrat is written as if it’s 1949, the year Joe Besser starred with Abbott and Costello in the comedy Africa Speaks. We are publishing several Joe Besser articles in this issue to help promote the upcoming Joe Besser Film Festival which will
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Criterion Collection: Ministry of Fear | Blu-ray Review

Fritz Lang aficionados can rejoice this month with Criterion’s release of his 1944 title, Ministry of Fear, the first time it sees a DVD transfer. Long regarded as a minor entry in Lang’s prestigious filmography, the last of a successive trio of anti-Nazi themed films from the German émigré is finally available for rediscovery. Though it may never escape its current status in the pantheon of its director’s legacy, it certainly stands out as an oddly constructed creature, a fussy war time noir whose sinister narrative is occluded by a stagnant paranoia that stirs the proceedings into a twisty nightmare.

Stephen Neale (Ray Milland) has just been released from Embridge Asylum in England while World War II rages on. He’s been put away for two years and insistently plans on traveling directly to London, even though it’s being bombed continuously. On the way there, he innocently stops at a village fair,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Exclusive: Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd DVD Clip

Exclusive: Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd DVD Clip
We have a brand new exclusive clip from the classic Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd, which is available on DVD exclusively through Warner Archive. Take a look at this video below, which features Budd Abbott and Lou Costello trying to dig for treasure.

Click to watch Exclusive: Digging for Treasure!

clickHere for information on how to order this Abbott and Costello classic from Warner Archives.

Abbott. Costello. Laughton. Three stars boasting one Oscar between them deliver the yo-ho-ho-ho-ing of this merry musical-comedy tale of pirates and buried treasure. Casting an acclaimed actor renowned for gravitas in a knockabout romp may seem unusual. Yet Academy Award winner Charles Laughton, who portrayed menacing Captain Bligh in Mutiny on the Bounty and the title role in the swashbuckling adventure Captain Kidd, sails into this sea of silliness with great glee. Instigators of most of that silliness are, of course, the legendary Bud and Lou,
See full article at MovieWeb »

[TV] The Abbott and Costello Show: The Complete Series

In the golden age of classic film and television, few comedians could match the success and popularity of legendary comic duo Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. The pair was successful in almost every medium, including stage, radio, film, cartoon, and television. Toward the end of their career, the duo had already hosted the Colgate Comedy Hour and decided to do a TV series that would utilize their classic gags while still reaching a newer, younger audience. The result was The Abbott and Costello Show.

Premiering in 1951, The Abbott and Costello Show was a short-lived success. Although it ran only two seasons, it showcased the pair’s reliable repertoire of routines which they had originally done in vaudeville and reintroduced to new generations of film and TV fans. You don’t have to be an Abbott and Costello fan to have heard of their routines, which were usually based on Costello
See full article at JustPressPlay »

[DVD Review] The Abbott and Costello Show: The Complete Series

In the golden age of classic film and television, few comedians could match the success and popularity of legendary comic duo Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. The pair was successful in almost every medium, including stage, radio, film, cartoon, and television. Toward the end of their career, the duo had already hosted the Colgate Comedy Hour and decided to do a TV series that would utilize their classic gags while still reaching a newer, younger audience. The result was The Abbott and Costello Show.

Premiering in 1951, The Abbott and Costello Show was a short-lived success. Although it ran only two seasons, it showcased the pair’s reliable repertoire of routines which they had originally done in vaudeville and reintroduced to new generations of film and TV fans. You don’t have to be an Abbott and Costello fan to have heard of their routines, which were usually based on Costello
See full article at JustPressPlay »

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