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The Moment the ‘Son of Sam’ Was Captured by Police 40 Years Ago, Ending His Murder Spree: ‘You Got Me’

  • PEOPLE.com
Four decades ago, a lowly postal worker from Yonkers held all of New York City in the grip of terror, carrying out a deadly string of late-night shootings that killed six and injured seven, triggering one of the largest police manhunts in the city’s history.

David Berkowitz — the self-proclaimed “Son of Sam” — evaded police for more than a year but was arrested on Aug. 10, 1977, outside his apartment building.

Investigation Discovery’s two-hour documentary, Son of Sam: The Hunt for a Killer, ran Aug. 5 and is now available on ID’s TV Everywhere platform, ID Go. (A clip is above.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Inside Serial Killer Son of Sam’s Life Now: How He’s Been Born-Again as ‘Son of Hope’ and Doesn’t Want to Leave Prison

  • PEOPLE.com
In the years since his arrest ended a reign of terror over New York City that peaked in the summer of 1977, David Berkowitz — the serial killer known as the “Son of Sam” — has rechristened himself the “Son of Hope,” claiming he’s a born-again Christian who wants to remain behind bars, according to his visitors in prison.

The redemptive identity is an attempt to replace the menacing one that Berkowitz, now 64, adopted in taunting letters written to police and a newspaper columnist during a deadly rampage that gripped the city in fear 40 years ago.

His 13-month shooting spree, which killed
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Mike Gold: Snappy Skippy Williamson

  • Comicmix
Skip Williamson (L), Jay Lynch

In this space two weeks ago, I wrote about the death of cartoonist and comix legend Jay Lynch. I noted his half-century friendship with Skip Williamson; despite their physical distance, I don’t think two people could have been closer.

As fate would have it, Skip died eleven days after Jay. Each was 72 years old. For long-time friends of the pair, for long-time fans of the pair – and I count myself among both groups – the timing was crippling. Skip long had heart problems so even though it was shocking, it wasn’t totally unexpected. However, there’s a kind of appropriateness about that timing that makes complete sense.

I won’t repeat their mutual history other than to mention the first comic book they pioneered was Bijou Funnies. Both had contributed to Harvey Kurtzman’s Help! Magazine and, later, to Playboy. Skip’s most revered character was Snappy Sammy Smoot,
See full article at Comicmix »

Harvey Weinstein On Chuck Berry, Maybelline & Jimmy Breslin

  • Deadline
Harvey Weinstein On Chuck Berry, Maybelline & Jimmy Breslin
Editor’s Note: Harvey Weinstein is an occasional contributor to Deadline when he has something on his mind. This weekend, two icons of my youth passed. One was a fiery musician, Chuck Berry, the other a fiery journalist, Jimmy Breslin. I didn't know either of them well but had great encounters with the two. When I was 19 or 20 years old, I started my concert company with a partner named Corky Burger. The first concert we produced, because our university ran out of money…
See full article at Deadline »

Mindy Newell: What Is Human?

  • Comicmix
Death has been everywhere lately this March of 2017. Actor Bill Paxton. Rock and Roll pioneer Chuck Berry. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Jimmy Breslin. The great artist Bernie Wrightson. Underground comics’ Jay Lynch and Skip Williamson. ComicMix’s Tweeks Maddy and Anya Ernst’s grandmother. Fellow columnist Marc Alan Fishman’s college friend. My dad.

As Martha Thomases said last week, although in an entirely different context – Too Much! Too Much!

Radiolab, which airs on NPR – check your local station – is a show that features issues both philosophical and scientific. In its 15th year, I was listening on Saturday as the hosts, Jay Abrumrad and Robert Kulwich, discussed a case brought to their attention by reporter Ike Siskandarajah. It was called “Mutant Rights.”

Two international tariff lawyers, Sherry Singer and Indie Singh, discovered that the legal classification of “doll” were taxed at a higher rate – 12% – than the legal classification of “toy,
See full article at Comicmix »

Jimmy Breslin, Pulitzer-Winning New York Journalist and Author, Dies at 88

  • The Wrap
Jimmy Breslin, Pulitzer-Winning New York Journalist and Author, Dies at 88
Jimmy Breslin, the Pulitzer-winning reporter and columnist whose life was as outsized as the New York City characters he depicted and exposed in print, died Sunday at the age of 88. He died in his Manhattan home from complications from pneumonia, according to the New York Daily News. The Queens native — who never shook his accent from that borough — became a fixture of big-city journalism, primarily for the New York Daily News, by championing the little guy. Also Read: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2017 (Photos) He also was the source of both scoops and controversy through the years. In the summer...
See full article at The Wrap »

God's Pocket, film review: Philip Seymour Hoffman shines on the dark side of town

There is a long tradition of hard-drinking American newspaper columnists who write about big city street life in a romantic and comic way. From Damon Runyon to Jimmy Breslin, these writers are fascinated by violence, criminality, gambling, infidelity and family strife. They see the humour and pathos in stories that, in their basic details, are often sordid or banal. They also relish the eccentricities of types others regard as thugs, slobs and deadbeats.
See full article at The Independent »

Conversation with Kelly Reilly about Calvary

Calvary director/writer John Michael McDonagh with Kelly Reilly at the Explorers Club: "Well, in Ireland, 'dirty little whore', it's almost like endearing."

John Michael McDonagh's Calvary stars Brendan Gleeson, Kelly Reilly, Chris O'Dowd, Isaach De Bankolé, Domhnall Gleeson, Dylan Moran with The Diving Bell And The Butterfly's Marie-Josée Croze, Aidan Gillen, Dylan Moran, M Emmet Walsh and David Wilmot. Fox Searchlight Pictures celebrated with a luncheon at the Explorers Club in New York with guests including Jimmy Breslin, Dana Delany, Jodi Applegate, Annette Insdorf, Eugene Hernandez, Joyce Carol Oates and Charles Gross.

I spoke with Kelly Reilly and what started out with Monica Vitti in Michelangelo Antonioni's Red Desert and Tippi Hedren's style in Hitchcock's The Birds, quickly turned to themes of forgiveness which brought us to develop a quick theory of a Holy Female Trinity holding Calvary together, before lunch was served.

Brendan Gleeson
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

God’S Pocket – The Review

Just a week after the release of a feature film directed by a prominent actor, I’m speaking of Fading Gigolo by John Tuturro, comes another one helmed by an actor. But this is his feature film debut, oh, and he’s not in front of the camera (but Tuturro is, the busy guy!). God’S Pocket is helmed by John Slattery who has attained TV immortality as indulgent “bad boy” Roger Sterling on AMC’s “Mad Men”, where he cut his film making teeth calling the shots on five episodes. With this feature he’s back doing a period piece (his TV show is set from 1960-69, while this film appears to be from the late 70′s early 80′s…no cell phones or computers and everybody drives a big ‘gas-guzzler’), but the characters are laborers and petty thieves, not ad execs. Same general East Coast area though. The film
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

'Law & Order: Svu' - 'Criminal Stories': Alec Baldwin nails it in Mariska Hargitay's directorial debut

That Alec Baldwin can play a cocky, know-it-all New Yorker should not be a surprise. 

That he can do so as a newspaper columnist with an innate sense of decency and play him quietly -- against type -- is.

In "Criminal Stories," Wednesday's (March 19) episode of "Law & Order: Svu," Mariska Hargitay makes her directorial debut and the episode is flawless. Baldwin is Jimmy MacArthur of the New York Ledger and is modeled after great tabloid columnists like Pete Hamill, Jimmy Breslin and Mike McAlary.

Mac visits the squad room to do a profile of Benson (Hargitay). She is not pleased and becomes even less so when she learns that 1 Police Plaza has given him full clearance. He can go on ridealongs and into meetings and isn't to be shut out of anything.

Though she puts him off, Mac is persistent and they finally meet for a late dinner. 

"I have
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

The best bar in the world that I know about

The first Chicago bar I drank in was the Old Town Ale House. That bar was destroyed by fire in the 1960s, the customers hosed off, and the Ale House moved directly across the street to its present location, where it has been named Chicago's Best Dive Bar by the Chicago Tribune.

I was taken to the Ale House by Tom Devries, my fellow college editor from the Roosevelt Torch. It was early on a snowy Sunday afternoon. I remember us walking down to Barbara's Bookstore to get our copies of the legendary New York Herald-Tribune Sunday edition. Pogo. Judith Crist. Tom Wolfe. Jimmy Breslin. I remember peanut shells on the floor and a projector grinding through 16mm prints of Charlie Chaplin shorts. I remember my first taste of dark Löwenbräu beer. The Ale House was cool even then.

I returned to the North Avenue drinking scene on New Year's Eve
See full article at Roger Ebert's Blog »

The best bar in the world that I know about

The first Chicago bar I drank in was the Old Town Ale House. That bar was destroyed by fire in the 1960s, the customers hosed off, and the Ale House moved directly across the street to its present location, where it has been named Chicago's Best Dive Bar by the Chicago Tribune.

I was taken to the Ale House by Tom Devries, my fellow college editor from the Roosevelt Torch. It was early on a snowy Sunday afternoon. I remember us walking down to Barbara's Bookstore to get our copies of the legendary New York Herald-Tribune Sunday edition. Pogo. Judith Crist. Tom Wolfe. Jimmy Breslin. I remember peanut shells on the floor and a projector grinding through 16mm prints of Charlie Chaplin shorts. I remember my first taste of dark Löwenbräu beer. The Ale House was cool even then.

I returned to the North Avenue drinking scene on New Year's Eve
See full article at Roger Ebert's Blog »

Tom Hanks To Play Crime Reporter Mike McAlary In Nora Ephron-Penned ‘Lucky Guy’ On Broadway

  • Deadline
Tom Hanks To Play Crime Reporter Mike McAlary In Nora Ephron-Penned ‘Lucky Guy’ On Broadway
This one has been long in the works, but now Tom Hanks has committed to play Mike McAlary in Lucky Guy, the play that Nora Ephron completed before she died in late June at age 71. Early in my career, I worked with McAlary for five years at New York Newsday, and I must say I was in awe of the guy and his daily accomplishments. Despite his outsized reputation and accomplishments, Mike was this big unassuming Irishman, and you would say hello in the elevator and share some small talk, and then get into the newsroom and see that while most of us were sleeping Mike had broken some unbelievable crooked-cop story late that night. Like the time he met a cop who got caught up in a corruption case and bared his misdeeds to Mike. Then went home and blew his brains out. And there was Mike’s chilling account of it all.
See full article at Deadline »

Judy, Judy, Judy

I only met Judith Crist once, but her career had an enormous role in shaping the world of the movie critics who followed her. She was the first full-time female movie critic for a big American daily newspaper, but set aside her gender: By her success and fame, she created jobs for movie critics where there were none before.

When she went to work for the New York Herald-Tribune in the 1940s, few newspapers had movie critics writing under their own names (the New York Times was an exception). The movie reviews were considered a "house column," farmed out on a film-by-film basis to assorted reporters, who wrote under such punning bylines as "Kate Cameron" (New York Daily News) and "May Tinee" (Chicago Tribune). Crist was fearless, acerbic and merciless--"Hollywood's most hated person," it was said.

She wrote a sensational pan of "Cleopatra," saying Elizabeth Taylor's acting "often rises to fishwife levels.
See full article at Roger Ebert's Blog »

Film critic Judith Crist dies at 90

Film critic Judith Crist dies at 90
Judith Crist, a blunt and popular film critic for the Today show, TV Guide and the New York Herald Tribune whose reviews were at times so harsh that director Otto Preminger labeled her “Judas Crist,” has died. She was 90.

Her son, Steven Crist, said his mother died Tuesday at her Manhattan home after a long illness.

Starting in 1963, at the Tribune, Crist wrote about and discussed thousands of movies for millions of readers and viewers, and also covered theater and books.

She was the first woman to become a full-time critic at a major U.S. newspaper and was among
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Review and Recap -- 'Luck' Episode Four: Where's Bernstein?

Review and Recap -- 'Luck' Episode Four: Where's Bernstein?
Luck is the residue of design.” Or is it? Whether or not Branch Rickey’s famous dictum – an appeal to reason and not the gods – is true lies at the heart of the fourth episode of Luck, written by staffer Jay Hovdey and directed by Philip Noyce (“Salt”). The question also illuminates what’s right and what’s wrong with the series. (If you don’t know Branch Rickey, the man who transformed baseball and with it American society, Jimmy Breslin’s fine short biography is a good place to start.) In the series as in life, there are gamblers who ignore the dictum entirely. They abandon themselves to the gods, who play...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Mike Gold: Gifts for Comic Book People

  • Comicmix
Yep, the gift-giving holidays are upon us once again. Here’s three recent releases that are among the top of my list.

The Stan Lee Universe, by Danny Fingeroth and Roy Thomas TwoMorrows Publishing, $39.95 hardcover; also available in softcover and digital

If you’re asking “who’s Stan Lee and why should I care about his universe?” then I’m asking “why are you reading a website called ComicMix?” I’m not going to waste bandwidth establishing Stan’s street cred. The Stan Lee Universe is not the definitive biography of Stan Lee; even at 89 years of age (in three weeks), he’s continuing to create new comics properties and appearing on television shows and in movies and his story remains a work in progress. As a life-long comics fan and practicing professional, I find great comfort in that.

The Stan Lee Universe is a massive gathering of articles, interviews,
See full article at Comicmix »

What’s the Best Newspaper Column of All Time?

What’s the Best Newspaper Column of All Time?
Everett Ernie Pyle

The National Society of Newspaper Columnists has weighed in on the question of what it considers the finest example of its craft. And the short answer? No, Virginia.

In an online poll, the society’s members voted Ernie Pyle’s “The Death of Captain Warskow ” the best column ever published in an American newspaper, placing the 1944 story ahead of Francis Pharcellus Church’s classic 1897 editorial-page proclamation, “Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus.” The announcement about the
See full article at Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal »

‘Crazy Love’: Caught Between Art and Trash

  • SoundOnSight
Crazy Love

Directed by Dan Klores

Fisher Stevens (co-director)

I will freely admit to having a particular fondness for upsetting documentaries. I’m intrigued by first-person narratives where terrible things happen to those telling the stories, to John Irving-esq tales of lives diverging in some horrible and unpredictable way. I am also fond of trashy docs; films about serial killers that present conjecture and hyperbole as fact and poorly-researched docs about neo-Nazis and Christian right-wing movements and generally tabloid-worthy investigations are the focus of some of my favourite things to watch for fun.

Unfortunately, Crazy Love is really neither. Too well researched and competently presented to be a trashy distraction but with a story far too trashy to be interesting in any other context, Dan Klores’s new film is a confusing experience.

The story, beginning in the late 1950’s, revolves around Bert Pugach, a New York lawyer, and
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Top Chef Recap: Restaurant Wars And Fish Peace-es

  • BestWeekEver
This is a Recap of Top Chef All-Stars (Season 8), Episode 7, entitled “Restaurant Wars: One Night only”, originally airing January 19th, 2011. It contains spoilers about penises, just Fyi. For the Quickfire, we head to Eric Ripert’s Le Bernardin to meet the mythical folk hero Justo Thomas, the fish prepper who butchers “1000 pounds of fish every day” and when he’s out it takes “three trained sous chefs to do his job.” He also pulls crooked roads straight, drinks gasoline and farts Dom, and built the Empire State Building by hand as a life-sized replica of his d*ck. After a bunch of hobos spin yarns about Justo’s superhuman filleting feats, Bourdain declares “I think we know what comes next. That’s right – guest judge Jimmy Breslin will give you a New York street number and you have to cook a dish that represents the essence of that number, because
See full article at BestWeekEver »
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