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Meryl Streep’s Best Movie Lines

Meryl Streep’s Best Movie Lines
Over her storied career, Meryl Streep has racked up dozens of film credits going back to the ’70s, scored a record-breaking 20 Oscar nominations (along with three wins), and, of course, delivered golden line after golden line.

With the actress turning 68 on Thursday, Variety decided it was as good a time as any to look back at some of Streep’s best lines, from the funny to the sassy to the downright inspirational.

“How do I look?” — Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)

Following a divorce, and nasty custody battle complete with character assassination and conflicted emotion, Streep as Joanna Kramer seals her first Oscar win with a question — “How do I look?” — as she boards an elevator to see her son.

“The dingo took my baby!” – “Cry in the Dark” (1988)

Often misquoted as “A dingo ate my baby,” Streep’s exclamation after a wild dog snatches her infant from a tent, delivered in a flawless Australian accent, has become part of pop culture. Elaine made it a memorable put-down in a “Seinfeld” episode.

“I’m not a box. I don’t have sides. This is it. One side fits all.” — “Postcards From the Edge” (1990)

In “Postcards From the Edge,” Meryl Streep is Carrie Fisher’s muse, and embodies the late Hollywood royal in all her snarky, unpredictable, and out-of-control glory. With this line, Streep’s Suzanne Vale snaps back at her love interest Jack Faulkner (Dennis Quaid) to make sure he knows exactly where they stand.

“I am a righteous bitch, aren’t I?” — “Dancing at Lughnasa” (1998)

In the long history of Streep delivering flawlessly sassy lines, let no one forget her 1998 role in period film “Dancing at Lughnasa,” where she played Kate “Kit” Mundy. After her sister Aggie (Brid Brennan) declares, “Do you ever listen to yourself, Kate? You are such a damned righteous bitch,” Streep’s Kit can only delightfully agree.

“That is what we do. That is what people do. They stay alive for each other.” — “The Hours” (2002)

In one heartbreaking scene of “The Hours,” Streep, who plays New Yorker Clarissa Vaughan, has a candid conversation with the AIDs-striken Richard (Ed Harris), who asks her why he should even stay alive, if not for her.

“The assassin always dies, baby. It’s necessary for the national healing.” — “The Manchurian Candidate” (2004)

Meryl Streep played U.S. Senator Eleanor Prentiss Shaw, the manipulative mother of Liev Schreiber’s Raymond Shaw. She perfectly embodies the ruthless nature of her character when she delivers the difficult truth to her son.

Various — “Devil Wears Prada” (2006)

Where to even start with Streep’s endlessly quotable performance as Miranda Priestly? At the end, of course, with the line that the actress brilliantly tweaked during the table read from “Everybody wants to be me” to “Everybody wants to be us.” With this statement we realize how much Andy (Anne Hathaway) has changed (and, really, how much we all have). Some of Streep’s greatest lines stem from her impatient snark (“By all means, move at a glacial pace. You know how that thrills me.”) And she has a certain specialty in the way she delivers questions (“Why is no one ready?”; “Florals? For spring? Groundbreaking.”). But the line that defines Streep’s performance, is the two-word dismissal that becomes her refrain: “That’s all.”

“I have doubts… I have such doubts.” — “Doubt” (2008)

Meryl Streep allows the veneer of stern self-assurance in her character, Sister Aloysius Beauvier, to crack in a moment of emotional release. “I have doubts … I have such doubts,” she breaks down about her ability to expose Father Flynn (Philip Seymour Hoffman), and her faith in the church at large.

“If what I think is happening is happening … it better not be.” — “Fantastic Mr. Fox” (2009)

Meryl Streep is the matriarch in Wes Anderson’s endlessly quirky and quippy animated masterpiece — stern and even, and a foil for her rambunctious husband voiced by George Clooney. In this scene she calls out his tomfoolery: “If what I think is happening,” she says, and the camera closes in on her judgmental gaze. “… it better not be.”

“These damn things are as hot as a stiff c—!” – “Julie and Julia” (2009)

Meryl Streep totally nailed TV chef Julia Child’s breathy and sometimes risqué enthusiasm, as in this scene where she pulls two large cannellonis from boiling water using her bare hands.

“We will stand on principle, or we will not stand at all.” — “The Iron Lady” (2011)

Streep’s performance as Margaret Thatcher earned her her most recent Oscar, and it’s easy to see why. When she tells Alexander Haig (Matthew Marsh) about why she will go to war with Argentina in an empassioned speech, it’s hard not to get chills.

“Is anybody supposed to smoke?” — “August: Osage County” (2013)

Streep played the delightfully sardonic Violet Weston in John Wells’ adaptation of Tracy Letts’ play. Her response to Ivy’s (Julianne Nicholson) quite obvious question is only one of many memorable lines from the drama (though not uttered by Streep, who can forget Julia Roberts’ “Eat the fish, bitch”?)

What’s your favorite Meryl Streep movie line? Let us know in the comments below!

Related storiesMeryl Streep, Judith Light, Lena Dunham, More Tell Sheila Nevins' Stories in New AudiobookRobert De Niro Calls Out Trump Administration's 'Bulls--' While Accepting Career Achievement AwardSteven Spielberg Pentagon Papers Drama Gets 2017 Oscar-Season Release
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ghostwatch: director Lesley Manning interview

Craig Lines Oct 31, 2016

24 years after infamous UK horror TV event Ghostwatch aired on the BBC, we chat to its director Lesley Manning...

Although Ghostwatch aired in 1992 and was never shown again on TV, its legacy endures. From the excellent Behind The Curtains documentary to its frequent appearances on “Scariest Moments” lists, people love to talk about what still remains the most controversial drama in broadcast history (and retains the record number of viewer complaints).

See related Marvel's Luke Cage episode 13 viewing notes: You Know My Steez The Punisher: 5 new cast members and 2017 release confirmed

To celebrate the BBC releasing it, at last, through their online store, Den Of Geek talked with director Lesley Manning about making the programme and its enduring influence…

How does it feel that every few years, so many people want to talk to you about Ghostwatch?

Well, because Stephen [Volk, writer] and I felt like lepers for a few years afterwards,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Brooklyn

The story of a brave, innocent immigrant gets a glorious re-telling. Never fear, for this emotional but unsentimental tale of an Irish lass making big decisions features a breakout performance by Saoirse Ronan, an actress who melts hearts with one flash of her blue eyes... Brooklyn Blu-ray 20th Century Fox 2015 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 111 min. / Street Date March 15, 2016 / 39.99 Starring Saoirse Ronan, Jim Broadbent, Emory Cohen, Domhnall Gleeson, Julie Walters, Brid Brennan, Maeve McGrath, Emma Lowe, Fiona Glascott, Jane Brennan, Eileen O'Higgins, Peter Campion, Eva Birthistle, Emily Bett Rickards, Eve Macklin, Nora-Jane Noone, Mary O'Driscoll, Jessica Paré. Cinematography Yves Bélanger Film Editor Jake Roberts Original Music Michael Brook Written by Nick Hornby from the novel by Colm Toibin Produced by Finola Dwyer, Amanda Posey Directed by John Crowley

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

2015 brought us dynamic films about post-apocalyptic horrors, child molestation in Boston, a sex-change pioneer, and the 2009 economic meltdown. How happy it is then,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Brooklyn movie review: across the ocean to find yourself

Beautifully portrays a very universal experience — not only of immigration but of growing up — via an elegantly nuanced performance by Saoirse Ronan. I’m “biast” (pro): love Saoirse Ronan

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

I have not read the source material

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

In 2011, I moved from New York to London. I can make free video phone calls to my friends and family, and I can be home in a few hours; planes go back and forth between the two cities with the regularity and frequency of a bus schedule (if, alas, for quite a bit more than bus fare). But still: it was hard. It remains an emotional challenge to be separated from people I love back home even as I get more and more emotionally connected to a new home.

So I cannot even imagine what it must have
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Brooklyn review

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Fancy checking out one of the best films of the year? Here's our review of Brooklyn, starring Saiorse Ronan.

In amongst the showier performance-led movies to come this awards season, it's reassuring to see an unassuming coming-of-age story like Brooklyn receiving its fair share of plaudits too. Based on Colm Tóibín's novel of the same name, Brooklyn follows an immigrant's trans-Atlantic love song, set between south-east Ireland and New York City.

In the 1950s, Eilis Lacey (Saiorse Ronan) is a young Irish woman living in Enniscorthy who gets the opportunity of a lifetime when kindly priest Father Flood (Jim Broadbent) arranges for her to travel to Brooklyn and take up a job at a department store. Of course, Eilis jumps at the chance, but leaves behind her elder sister Rose (Fiona Glascott) and her mother Mary (Jane Brennan) for the glamour of America.

She becomes desperately homesick,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Sundance Film Review: ‘Brooklyn’

Sundance Film Review: ‘Brooklyn’
A 1950s American immigrant story told as if it took place a half-century earlier, “Brooklyn” unfolds almost like a prim Victorian novel, presenting a young Irish woman, nobly brought to life by Saoirse Ronan, torn between two lovers — one a polite, red-headed chap from her hometown, the other a brash Italian-American who falls for her during her new life abroad — where her big decision has as much to do with choosing between countries as courters. Beautifully written, but still a bit flat in its transition to the screen, this sensitive adaptation of Colm Toibin’s bestseller, acquired by Fox Seachlight at Sundance, should assimilate nicely with more mainstream fare.

As a nation of immigrants, the United States represents a roiling tapestry of expat experiences, in which each family traces its roots back to whichever dauntless ancestors crossed the ocean to pursue a better life for themselves. The movies abound with such genealogical histories,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre – All My Sons Review

Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre returns this summer with another stellar line-up of plays – and currently on the bill is Timothy Sheader’s stellar adaptation of Arthur Miller’s All My Sons. Coming on the heels of a highly successful West End version of the classic play just a few years ago, Sheader’s production is inevitably a no-frills arrangement by comparison – but it uses its venue wonderfully to its strengths.

Taking place over the course of one night in small-town 50s America, All My Sons concerns two families bound by love and war. At the centre of it all is a character only ever referred to by name – dead soldier Larry Keller, who never came home from the war. His mother Kate (Brid Brennan) refuses to move on, waiting for her son to return; meanwhile, his brother Chris (Charles Aitken) announces his engagement to Larry’s sweetheart Ann
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Exclusive: Clive Owen and Andrea Riseborough Talk Shadow Dancer

Exclusive: Clive Owen and Andrea Riseborough Talk Shadow Dancer
Single mother Collette McVeigh (Andrea Riseborough) is a Republican living in Belfast with her mother and hardliner Ira brothers. When she is arrested for her part in an aborted Ira bomb plot in London, an MI5 officer named Mac (Clive Owen) offers her a choice: lose everything and go to prison for 25 years or return to Belfast to spy on her own family. With her son's life in her hands, Collette chooses to place her trust in Mac and return home, but when her brothers' secret operation is ambushed, suspicions of an informant are raised and Collette finds both herself and her family in grave danger. Justine Browning recently sat down with director James Marsh and his leading man and lady, Clive Owen and Andrea Riseborough, for a rousing talk about this thriller, in theaters now. Check out our exclusive video interviews, and go behind-the-scenes of Shadow Dancer.

Shadow Dancer
See full article at MovieWeb »

Andrea Riseborough Talks Shadow Dancer, the Film’s Reception in Northern Ireland, Her Personal Memories of the Era, Iñárritu’s Birdman, and More

Andrea Riseborough delivers a compelling performance as Collette McVeigh, a character who risks everything in Shadow Land, Academy Award-winning director James Marsh’s taut, thought-provoking adaptation of the Tom Bradley conspiracy thriller about an Ira member turned MI5 spy in 1990s Belfast. A single mother living with her mother (Brid Brennan) and hardliner Ira brothers (Aidan Gillen, Domhnall Gleeson), Collette is arrested for her part in an aborted Ira bomb plot in London. An MI5 officer (Clive Owen) offers her a choice: go to prison and never see her son again or return to Belfast and turn informer against her own family. Opening May 31st, the film also features Gillian Anderson. At the recent press day, Riseborough talked about her character, what drew her to the complicated role, how her Rada training helped her prepare, what it was like traveling back in time to the 1990s, her personal experiences and memories of the era,
See full article at Collider.com »

Exclusive: Shadow Dancer TV Spot Starring Clive Owen

Exclusive: Shadow Dancer TV Spot Starring Clive Owen
An Ira agent must switch sides to protect her son in our exclusive TV spot for Shadow Dancer, which debuts on VOD formats today, April 25, before its theatrical debut May 31. Andrea Riseborough stars as Collette McVeigh, who is captured in London by an MI5 agent (Clive Owen) and forced to switch sides. Check out the latest footage from this thriller, directed by James Marsh (Man on Wire).

Shadow Dancer - Exclusive "TV Spot"

Single mother Collette McVeigh is a Republican living in Belfast with her mother and hardliner Ira brothers. When she is arrested for her part in an aborted Ira bomb plot in London, an MI5 officer offers her a choice: lose everything and go to prison for 25 years or return to Belfast to spy on her own family. With her son's life in her hands, Collette chooses to place her trust in Mac and return home, but when
See full article at MovieWeb »

Ifta Winners List 2013

  • TheMovieBit
Last night, the glitz and glamour of the 10th annual Irish Film and Television Awards came to Dublin, with a who's who of Irish Talent gathering to celebrate an absolutely fantastic year in Irish film and television (seriously, it was one of the best in recent memory. This current crop is a really talented bunch). Surprising just about nobody, What Richard Did proved to be the big winner, netting 5 awards, including Best Film, and Grabbers, which should have done better than it actually did, bagging Ruth Bradley a Best Actress award. A full list of winners, in all categories, is below: Film Best Film: What Richard Did Best Director: Lenny Abrhamson (What Richard Did) Best Script: Malcolm Campbell (What Richard Did) Best Actor: Jack Reynor (What Richard Did) Best Supporting Actor: Domhnall Gleeson (Anna Karenina) Best Actress: Ruth Bradley (Grabbers) Best Supporting Actress: Bríd Brennan (Shadow Dancer) Special Irish Language Award: Lón Sa.
See full article at TheMovieBit »

DVD Review - Shadow Dancer (2012)

Shadow Dancer, 2012.

Directed by James Marsh.

Starring Clive Owen, Andrea Riseborough, Gillian Anderson, Aidan Gillen, Domhnall Gleeson, Brid Brennan, David Wilmot, Stuart Graham and Martin McCann.

Synopsis:

Single mother Collette McVeigh is a Republican living in Belfast with her mother and hardliner Ira brothers. When she is arrested for her part in an aborted Ira bomb plot in London, an MI5 officer (Mac) offers her a choice: lose everything and go to prison for 25 years or return to Belfast to spy on her own family.

One of 2012’s better films, sorely overlooked due to its small distribution, comes to DVD and is an absolute must see.

Set in Northern Ireland in 1993, Shadow Dancer is a tightly wound little thriller which pays more time devoted to its characters and their divided loyalties and emotions than a typical film about working undercover might usually allow. The tension is built around the intentions of its lead character,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

DVD Review: Shadow Dancer

Shadow Dancer

Stars: Clive Owen, Andrea Riseborough, Gillian Anderson, Aidan Gillen, Domhnall Gleeson, Brid Brennan, David Wilmot, Stuart Graham, Martin McCann | Written by Tom Bradby | Directed by James Marsh

Director James Marsh, best known for his critically acclaimed documentaries Man on Wire and Project Nim, dabbles once more with fiction with Shadow Dancer, a tense and engaging thriller set against the backdrop of the Troubles in early nineties Belfast.

Andrea Riseborough plays Collette, a mother, daughter, sister and member of the Ira. After she is captured by MI5 during an unsuccessful London bombing attempt, Clive Owen’s bullish agent ‘Mac’ convinces her to act as an informant rather than go to prison and face separation from her son. The danger to Collette gradually increases as her precarious position becomes ever more untenable and Mac grows more and more conflicted over his actions as the narrative progresses.

Backing up the
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Shadow Dancer adds movie poster 3

Check out the final French poster for James Marsh 's Andrea Riseborough, Clive Owen and Gillian Anderson thriller Shadow Dancer. There's no U.S. release date set for the film distributed by Ato Pictures, after the film made its Stateside film fest debut at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival. Cast also includes Aidan Gillen, Domhnall Gleeson, Brid Brennan, David Wilmot, Stuert Graham and Martin McCann. Shadow Dancer originated as a novel, written by Tom Bradby during his time as a TV correspondent in Northern Ireland in the 1990s. Tom Bradby adapted his novel for the big screen and this marks his first feature film.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Shadow Dancer adds movie poster 3

Check out the final French poster for James Marsh 's Andrea Riseborough, Clive Owen and Gillian Anderson thriller Shadow Dancer. There's no U.S. release date set for the film distributed by Ato Pictures, after the film made its Stateside film fest debut at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival. Cast also includes Aidan Gillen, Domhnall Gleeson, Brid Brennan, David Wilmot, Stuert Graham and Martin McCann. Shadow Dancer originated as a novel, written by Tom Bradby during his time as a TV correspondent in Northern Ireland in the 1990s. Tom Bradby adapted his novel for the big screen and this marks his first feature film.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Shadow Dancer movie poster 3 with Andrea Riseborough

Check out Andrea Riseborough in the new poster for James Marsh's Shadow Dancer thriller with Clive Owen starring. Tom Bradby writes the script, adapted from his own novel which is set in Belfast in the 90s, following an active member of the Ira who becomes an informant for MI5 to protect his son. The cast also includes Gillian Anderson, Aidan Gillen, Domhnall Gleeson, Brid Brennan, David Wilmot, Stuert Graham and Martin McCann. Chris Coen, Andrew Lowe and Ed Guiney produce Shadow Dancer, which is executive-produced by Brahim Chioua, Joe Oppenheimer, Rita Dagher, Vincent Maraval and Norman Merry. Shadow Dancer Plot: Shadow Dancer originated as a novel, written by Tom Bradby during his time as a TV correspondent in Northern Ireland in the 1990s. Tom Bradby adapted his novel for the big screen and Shadow Dancer is his first feature film. Single mother Collette McVeigh (Andrea Riseborough) is a Republican
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Shadow Dancer movie poster 3 with Andrea Riseborough

Check out Andrea Riseborough in the new poster for James Marsh's Shadow Dancer thriller with Clive Owen starring. Tom Bradby writes the script, adapted from his own novel which is set in Belfast in the 90s, following an active member of the Ira who becomes an informant for MI5 to protect his son. The cast also includes Gillian Anderson, Aidan Gillen, Domhnall Gleeson, Brid Brennan, David Wilmot, Stuert Graham and Martin McCann. Chris Coen, Andrew Lowe and Ed Guiney produce Shadow Dancer, which is executive-produced by Brahim Chioua, Joe Oppenheimer, Rita Dagher, Vincent Maraval and Norman Merry. Shadow Dancer Plot: Shadow Dancer originated as a novel, written by Tom Bradby during his time as a TV correspondent in Northern Ireland in the 1990s. Tom Bradby adapted his novel for the big screen and Shadow Dancer is his first feature film. Single mother Collette McVeigh (Andrea Riseborough) is a Republican
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Shadow Dancer movie poster

Check out the poster for James Marsh's Shadow Dancer movie starring Clive Owen Adapted by Tom Brady from his own novel, Shadow Dancer is set in 1990s Belfast where an active Ira member becomes an informant for MI5 in order to protect his son. Also in the talented cast are Andrea Riseborough, Gillian Anderson, Aidan Gillen, Domhnall Gleeson, Brid Brennan and David Wilmot. Dancer is produced by Chris Coen, Andrew Lowe and Ed Guiney while Joe Oppenheimer, Brahim Chioua, Rita Dagher, Vincent Maraval and Norman Merry serve as executive producers.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Shadow Dancer movie poster

Check out the poster for James Marsh's Shadow Dancer movie starring Clive Owen Adapted by Tom Brady from his own novel, Shadow Dancer is set in 1990s Belfast where an active Ira member becomes an informant for MI5 in order to protect his son. Also in the talented cast are Andrea Riseborough, Gillian Anderson, Aidan Gillen, Domhnall Gleeson, Brid Brennan and David Wilmot. Dancer is produced by Chris Coen, Andrew Lowe and Ed Guiney while Joe Oppenheimer, Brahim Chioua, Rita Dagher, Vincent Maraval and Norman Merry serve as executive producers.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Movie Review - Shadow Dancer (2012)

Shadow Dancer, 2012.

Directed by James Marsh.

Starring Clive Owen, Andrea Riseborough, Gillian Anderson, Aidan Gillen, Domhnall Gleeson, Brid Brennan, David Wilmot, Stuart Graham and Martin McCann.

Synopsis:

In 1990s Belfast, an Ira member becomes an MI5 informant in order to protect her son's welfare.

Following the recent events in Northern Ireland, James Marsh's 1993 set Ira drama feels more relevant and hard hitting than intended. The story follows Ira member Colette McVeigh (Andrea Riseborough on fine form) and her transformation to MI5 informant. The gritty, hard hitting drama is intriguing to watch, but unfortunately the plot doesn't provide anything new.

Shadow Dancer is a successful film because of the performances. Andrea Riseborough's often silent potrayal of Ira member Colette is real and fully formed. This is the performance that will define Riseborough and will hopefully propel her career. Colette is a tortured character from beginning to end and it
See full article at Flickeringmyth »
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