Scott Brady (I) - News Poster


He Walked by Night

Do you think older crime thrillers weren’t violent enough? This shocker from 1948 shook up America with its true story of a vicious killer who has a murderous solution to every problem, and uses special talents to evade police detection. Richard Basehart made his acting breakthrough as Roy Martin, a barely disguised version of the real life ‘Machine Gun Walker.

He Walked by Night



1948 / B&W /1:37 flat full frame / 79 min. / Street Date November 7, 2017 / 39.99

Starring: Richard Basehart, Scott Brady, Roy Roberts, Whit Bissell, James Cardwell, Jack Webb, Dorothy Adams, Ann Doran, Byron Foulger, Reed Hadley (narrator), Thomas Browne Henry, Tommy Kelly, John McGuire, Kenneth Tobey.

Cinematography: John Alton

Art Direction: Edward Ilou

Film Editor: Alfred De Gaetano

Original Music: Leonid Raab

Written by John C. Higgins and Crane Wilbur

Produced by Bryan Foy, Robert T. Kane

Directed by Alfred L. Werker

Talk about a movie with a dynamite
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New to Streaming: ‘Punch-Drunk Love,’ ‘Free Fire,’ ‘The Salesman,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Best in Show (Christopher Guest)

Christopher Guest has had an exceptionally strong ’00s with A Mighty Wind and For Your Consideration, and it remains to be seen how his upcoming Mascots will be received, but his arguable peak is still the gloriously funny mockumentary Best in Show. Guest’s other films have lovingly skewered egotistical oddballs and the insanity of subjective or objective criticism, so Best in Show is
See full article at The Film Stage »

Johnny Guitar (widescreen)

Olive's new branded line reissues the Nicholas Ray classic with a full set of authoritative extras -- plus a never-before-seen widescreen transfer, in all of its Trucolor glory. Joan Crawford and Sterling Hayden never looked better -- we can all compare theories about la Crawford's color-coded costumes. Just how masculine is Vienna supposed to be? Johnny Guitar (Olive Signature widescreen edition) Blu-ray Olive Films 1954 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 110 min. / Street Date September 20, 2016 / available through the Olive Films website / 39.95 but heavily discounted Starring Joan Crawford, Sterling Hayden, Mercedes McCambridge, Scott Brady, Ward Bond, Ben Cooper, Ernest Borgnine, John Carradine, Royal Dano, Frank Ferguson, Paul Fix, Rhys Williams. Cinematography Harry Stradling Film Editor Richard Van Enger Original Music Victor Young Written by Philip Yordan from the novel by Roy Chanslor Produced by Herbert J. Yates Directed by Nicholas Ray

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Wow, it's already been four years since Olive released a
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Johnny Guitar review – unforgettably strange, brilliant western

Nicholas Ray’s 1954 gem, starring Joan Crawford and Sterling Hayden, is an extraordinary psychological drama

“I intend to be buried here … in the 20th century!” Joan Crawford carries off this line with magnificent hauteur in Nicholas Ray’s extraordinary psychological western – and is there any other kind? This 1954 gem is on rerelease, starring Crawford as saloon-keeper Vienna, with a wonderful range of outfits, stark black eyes and a rectangular red slash of a mouth. Maria Callas herself couldn’t have played Vienna with more poise, more defiance, more passionate abandon. Vienna presides over a surreally upmarket establishment in the middle of the old west, offering roulette, though no customer ever bets. Her office has a bust of Beethoven, and she plays the piano herself. Vienna is waiting for the fancy eastern clientele brought by the slowly advancing railroad, or more to the point, waiting for the railroad company to buy her out,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Top Screenwriting Team from the Golden Age of Hollywood: List of Movies and Academy Award nominations

Billy Wilder directed Sunset Blvd. with Gloria Swanson and William Holden. Billy Wilder and Charles Brackett movies Below is a list of movies on which Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder worked together as screenwriters, including efforts for which they did not receive screen credit. The Wilder-Brackett screenwriting partnership lasted from 1938 to 1949. During that time, they shared two Academy Awards for their work on The Lost Weekend (1945) and, with D.M. Marshman Jr., Sunset Blvd. (1950). More detailed information further below. Post-split years Billy Wilder would later join forces with screenwriter I.A.L. Diamond in movies such as the classic comedy Some Like It Hot (1959), the Best Picture Oscar winner The Apartment (1960), and One Two Three (1961), notable as James Cagney's last film (until a brief comeback in Milos Forman's Ragtime two decades later). Although some of these movies were quite well received, Wilder's later efforts – which also included The Seven Year Itch
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

‘Port of New York’ is a serviceable thriller boosted by a magnetic Yul Brynner

Port of New York

Written by Eugene Ling

Directed by Lazlo Benedek

U.S.A., 1949

Ports, much like airports and border crosses, are the among the most important gates through which returning citizens, visitors and imported goods much pass in order to step onto a territory’s soil. The level of security associated with such to and fro activity is unfathomable, ranging from the verification of travellers identification pieces to the inspection of whatever goods said arrivals want to bring with them into the new country or state. Just ask New York customs agent Jim Flannery (Richard Rober), tasked with investigating the sudden disappearance of drugs originally intended for medicinal use. Enter narcotics officer Michael Waters (Scott Brady) who, together with Jim Flannery, is on the prowl for the stolen goods. A suspect presumed to be involved with the clandestine operation, Toni Cardell (K.T. Stevens) is pressured into confessing critical information,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

DVD Review: "Operation Bikini" (1963) Starring Tab Hunter And Frankie Avalon

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Founded by producers James H. Nicholson and Samuel Z. Arkoff, American International Pictures (A.I.P.) hit upon a formula of financing and releasing low-budget exploitation films for non-discriminating audiences (translation: the youth market). Specializing in horror films and goofy comedies, A.I.P. occasionally strayed into other genres. In 1963, the company capitalized on the always-popular WWII genre with the release of "Operation Bikini". Ostensibly, the movie's title referred to the obscure atoll in the Pacific where atomic bomb tests were conducted during the Cold War era. However, in true A.I.P. style, the advertising campaign was designed to imply that the title might also refer to the fact that the bikini bathing suit was popularized here by a French designer who conducted a photo shoot on the atoll just days after an atomic blast. (Ignorant of the risks from radiation poison, he merrily pronounced that "like the bomb,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

‘He Walked by Night’ is a slow burn procedural, perhaps even a little too slow at times

He Walked by Night

Written by John C. Higgins and Crane Wilbur

Directed by Alfred L. Werker and Anthony Mann

U.S.A., 1948

The very long and arduous investigation tasked of Los Angeles police captain Breen (Roy Roberts) and Sergeant Merty Brennan (Scott Brady) begins on a quiet night, on a quiet street when aspiring criminal guru Roy Martin (Richard Basehart) is accosted by a patrolling officer after the latter sees him trying to break into an electronics shop. Roy is prepared for the confrontation, surprising the unfortunate law enforcement representative with his pistol, killing the man in the process. With one of their own gunned down mercilessly, Captain Breen and Sgt. Brennan tackle one of the most difficult cases of their careers, a story inspired by the newspaper headlines of the time when in 1945 and 1946 a former police officer and army veteran Erwin Walker took the city by storm
See full article at SoundOnSight »

From 'Traitor' to Screen Legend: Fonda Still Busy on the Big Screen

Jane Fonda: From ‘Vietnam Traitor’ to AFI Award and Screen Legend status (photo: Jason Bateman and Jane Fonda in ‘This Is Where I Leave You’) (See previous post: “Jane Fonda Movies: Anti-Establishment Heroine.”) Turner Classic Movies will also be showing the 2014 AFI Life Achievement Award ceremony honoring Jane Fonda, the former “Vietnam Traitor” and Barbarella-style sex kitten who has become a living American screen legend (and healthy-living guru). Believe it or not, Fonda, who still looks disarmingly great, will be turning 77 years old next December 21; she’s actually older than her father Henry Fonda was while playing Katharine Hepburn’s ailing husband in Mark Rydell’s On Golden Pond. (Henry Fonda died at age 77 in August 1982.) Jane Fonda movies in 2014 and 2015 Following a 15-year absence (mostly during the time she was married to media mogul Ted Turner), Jane Fonda resumed her film acting career in 2005, playing Jennifer Lopez
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Gremlins' Remake Put on the Fast Track at Warner Bros.

'Gremlins' Remake Put on the Fast Track at Warner Bros.
Following our report yesterday that The Goonies 2 is moving forward at Warner Bros., Ain't It Cool News reports that a remake of Gremlins has also been put on the fast track to production at the studio.

We reported in May that the Gremlins remake will be produced by Seth Grahame-Smith and David Katzenberg, although it isn't known if the studio has found a writer or a director at this time. However, the remake likely won't materialize without the involvement of Steven Spielberg, who served as executive producer on the original Gremlins.

Gremlins starred Zach Galligan as a young man who receives a gremlin as a gift from his father, which comes with three stringent rules: don't get them wet, don't feed them after midnight and don't expose them to sunlight. When these rules are broken, the gremlins replicate at an astounding rate and wreak havoc upon this small town. Hoyt Axton,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Redgrave: “Doctor Who Is Like Joining MI5!”

Drew Boynton is a writer at Kasterborous Doctor Who News and Reviews - All the latest Doctor Who news and reviews with our weekly podKast, features and interviews, and a long-running forum.

What can you ask an actor when they have to be more secretive than a top-secret Unit secret mission? Well, it turns out…not much, really. At least in a new interview with Gerard Gilbert of The Independent, Jemma Redgrave is game to answer as much as she can. We know that she will be appearing

The post Redgrave: “Doctor Who Is Like Joining MI5!” appeared first on Kasterborous Doctor Who News and Reviews.
See full article at Kasterborous »

Beautiful, Lighthearted Fox Star Suffered Many Real-Life Tragedies

Jeanne Crain: Lighthearted movies vs. real life tragedies (photo: Madeleine Carroll and Jeanne Crain in ‘The Fan’) (See also: "Jeanne Crain: From ‘Pinky’ Inanity to ‘MargieMagic.") Unlike her characters in Margie, Home in Indiana, State Fair, Centennial Summer, The Fan, and Cheaper by the Dozen (and its sequel, Belles on Their Toes), or even in the more complex A Letter to Three Wives and People Will Talk, Jeanne Crain didn’t find a romantic Happy Ending in real life. In the mid-’50s, Crain accused her husband, former minor actor Paul Brooks aka Paul Brinkman, of infidelity, of living off her earnings, and of brutally beating her. The couple reportedly were never divorced because of their Catholic faith. (And at least in the ’60s, unlike the humanistic, progressive-thinking Margie, Crain was a “conservative” Republican who supported Richard Nixon.) In the early ’90s, she lost two of her
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Gremlins Remake Moves Forward with Producer Seth Grahame-Smith

Gremlins Remake Moves Forward with Producer Seth Grahame-Smith
Warner Bros. is moving forward with a remake to their 1984 classic Gremlins, with Seth Grahame-Smith and David Katzenberg coming on board to produce. The studio is currently seeking a director, but it is not known who will write the screenplay at this point.

Back in January, we reported that the studio was planning the reboot, with Steven Spielberg possibly returning to executive produce. His involvement with the remake has not been confirmed as of yet. That report said the remake would likely not move ahead without Steven Spielberg coming on board.

Joe Dante directed the original Gremlins, which starred Zach Galligan as a young man who receives a mogwai as a gift from his father, with three explicit rules: do not get them wet, do not feed them after midnight, and do not expose them to bright light. When these rules are broken, the gremlins begin to reproduce and create havoc upon this sleepy town.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Gremlins Reboot Being Planned by Warner Bros.; Steven Spielberg May Produce

Gremlins Reboot Being Planned by Warner Bros.; Steven Spielberg May Produce
Warner Bros. is in early negotiations with Steven Spielberg's Amblin Entertainment to bring the 1984 horror comedy Gremlins back to the big screen.

The reboot has been talked about many times throughout the years, but the film is not likely to gain traction unless Steven Spielberg is involved. The studio is hoping that the acclaimed director will come aboard the project as a producer, a position which he held on the original film, as well as its sequel Gremlins 2: The New Batch.

This reboot has been a hot topic for fans, none of whom want the franchise brought back to life, especially if it involves CGI. The original film utilized animatronic puppets in bringing the Mogwai and the Gremlins to life. It will be interesting to see how the project comes together, if at all.

Joe Dante directed the original, as well as the sequel. The film is about
See full article at MovieWeb »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: Johnny Guitar

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Aug. 7, 2012

Price: DVD $24.95, Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Olive Films

Joan Crawford stars in Nicholas Ray’s Johnny Guitar.

Director Nicholas Ray’s (Bigger Than Life) one-of-a-kind 1954 western Johnny Guitar makes its official U.S. DVD and Blu-ray debut nearly 60 years after its theatrical premiere.

The classic film stars Joan Crawford (Humoresque) as a saloon owner battling the local townspeople headed by Emma (Mercedes McCambridge, Suddenly, Last Summer), the local sexually repressed, lynch-happy female rancher out to frame her for a string of robberies. The title cowboy, played by Sterling Hayden (1900), is a guitar-strumming drifter with a dark past who was once in love with Crawford and has been offered a job in her saloon. Sparks and bullets and lots more eventually begin to fly…

Also starring Scott Brady, Ward Bond (Rio Bravo), Ernest Borgnine (Red) and John Carradine (The Ten Commandments), Ray’s strikingly colorful, intricately constructed film
See full article at Disc Dish »

All My Purchases Sorts Wad of E-ceipts From Square Users, Apple Stores, More

A company that started out looking to join the social commerce revolution found an opportunity in simply being useful to people trying to manage email receipts.

With the rise of Square's paperless transactions, those instant digital receipts from Apple Store purchases and others, inboxes are the new wallets--stuffed with too many receipts to even begin to organize.

That’s why Project Slice is today launching a new application that will automatically scan your emails and collect all your purchase information in a single place. You’ll be able to see a history of what you bought and when. And for online purchases, you’ll be able to see when your items shipped and what their tracking number are.

While our inboxes contain the records of everything we’ve bought online, trying to retrieve that information by searching for individual emails is far from easy. “It’s a problem we all experienced personally,
See full article at Fast Company »

Shadows of Film Noir: He Walked by Night

Shadows of Film Noir: He Walked by Night
He Walked by Night was a "B" movie released by Eagle Lion Films in late 1948 and early 1949. The credited director is Alfred L. Werker, but no one disputes that the actual director is the masterful Anthony Mann (who apparently took over production soon after it was begun). The movie was part of a series of increasingly accomplished noirs by Mann, including Railraoded! (1947), Desperate (1947), T-Men (1947), Raw Deal (1948), and Border Incident (1949). It's my favorite of the series; it manages to perfect the "docudrama" style begun in T-Men and Raw Deal, and it contains some of the most striking cinematography of the decade, creating a gripping combination of procedural and suspense. There are public domain videos available, but MGM/UA released on a good, quality DVD in 2003, which is still in print.

What It's About

A patrol cop is on his way home when he stops a suspicious man (Richard Basehart) on the street.
See full article at Cinematical »

Sydney Pollack: Hollywood's Quiet Icon

Director Sydney Pollack 1934-2008.

Director Sydney Pollack passed two years ago today. I had the good fortune to meet and interview Sydney Pollack twice, both of which are included here: first in 1999 for his well-made but ill-fated romantic drama "Random Hearts," and again in 2006 for what would be his final film, "Sketches of Frank Gehry," a masterful documentary look at the eponymous architect's life, work and process. It was also in many respects a personal investigation for Pollack himself, which he spoke quite candidly about during our conversation.

This has been a tough year for those of us who were weaned on the films of the so-called "Easy Riders and Raging Bulls" who made the iconic films of the late 1960s and 1970s, with the loss of such figures as Pollack, Roy Scheider, and others of the era. Pollack was certainly among the lions of that pack, but was perhaps
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Talkin' Westerns with A.C. Lyles

(A.C. Lyles, below)

by Jon Zelazny

Editor’s note: This article originally appeared at on February 27, 2009

There’s an A.C. Lyles Building at the Paramount Pictures main lot, but you won’t find A.C. Lyles there; his office is on the fourth floor of the William S. Hart Building.

When I arrived for our interview, Mr. Lyles was chatting with some visitors in his outer office. He bid me into his main office, and asked his assistant Pam to put in a video… a short promo reel that opens with a six minute tribute by then-President Ronald Reagan, who warmly recalls his and Nancy’s many years of friendship with A.C. and his wife Martha, and congratulates A.C. on his fifty years at the studio. The President’s intro is followed by taped congratulations from President Carter, President Ford, and Vice President Bush, then assorted clips celebrating Mr.
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

See also

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