News

Amazon Acquires James Gunn’s ‘Starsky and Hutch’ Reboot

Amazon Acquires James Gunn’s ‘Starsky and Hutch’ Reboot
James Gunn’s planned reboot of “Starsky and Hutch” has landed at Amazon, Variety has confirmed.

Amazon has given the project a script-to-series commitment. The streaming service will co-produce with Sony Pictures TV, which announced last week that they were developing the project. Gunn is attached to executive produce with his brother Brian Gunn and their cousin Mark Gunn writing the script, based on an original idea by James. The other two Gunns will also executive produce along with Neal Moritz and Pavun Shetty. Moritz will produce through his Sony-based Original Film banner, at which Shetty is the head of TV.

“When I was a kid, ‘Starsky & Hutch’ was the first ‘adult’ show I ever saw, and I fell in love,” said James Gunn. “It instilled in me a lifelong love of gritty street shows, of killer 70’s threads, and muscle cars. So when Neal Mortiz asked me if I wanted to be a part of an
See full article at Variety - TV News »

A Starsky & Hutch TV Reboot Is On The Way From James Gunn

Guardians Of The Galaxy director James Gunn is set to executive produce a brand new Starsky & Hutch TV series. The project is being set-up over at Sony Pictures TV, and is about to be pitched to broadcast, cable and streaming networks, according to Deadline.

James Gunn is writing the one-hour ‘procedural’, along with his brother Brian and their cousin Mark.

Starsky & Hutch was a hugely popular television series, which ran for four seasons from 1975 to 1979. The original work, created by William Blinn, centered on two detectives, David Michael Starsky (Paul Michael Glaser) and the by-the-book Kenneth Richard “Hutch” Hutchinson (David Soul), traversing the streets of the fictional Bay City, California in a two-door Ford Gran Torino.

It was also turned into a Todd Phillips-directed movie starring Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson in 2004.

Neal Moritz’s Original Film, which produced the movie, will also work on the potential new series.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Amazon grabs James Gunn's Starsky & Hutch TV reboot

Kirsten Howard Tony Sokol Sep 1, 2017

Guardians Of The Galaxy director James Gunn will produce a rebooted Starsky & Hutch series for Amazon, it's been confirmed...

Amazon have snatched up the recently-unveiled Starsky & Hutch reboot show from James Gunn's production company.

This is the first time the popular director has wanted to pursue a project on the small screen.

“When I was a kid, Starsky & Hutch was the first ‘adult’ show I ever saw, and I fell in love,” he explained in a statement. “It instilled in me a lifelong love of gritty street shows, of killer 70’s threads, and muscle cars. So when Neal Mortiz asked me if I wanted to be a part of an all new Starsky & Hutch on TV, I was instantly intrigued. I teamed up with the two writers I trusted most in the world to work with us, my brother Brian Gunn and my cousin
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Starsky and Hutch’ TV Reboot in Development With James Gunn

‘Starsky and Hutch’ TV Reboot in Development With James Gunn
Sony Pictures Television is developing a reboot of the classic cop series “Starsky and Hutch” with “Guardians of the Galaxy” mastermind James Gunn attached as an executive producer, Variety has confirmed.

In addition to executive producing, Gunn will also write the project along with his brother Brian Gunn and their cousin Mark Gunn. The three Gunns will also executive produce along with Neal Moritz and Pavun Shetty. Moritz will produce through his Sony-based Original Film banner, at which Shetty is the head of TV.

The original series starred David Soul and Paul Michael Glaser, running for four seasons and almost 100 episodes from 1975-1979 on ABC. It focused on Detectives David Starsky and Kenneth “Hutch” Hutchinson as they fight crime in the fictional Bay City. The show also featured Antonio Fargas as the street-wise informant Huggy Bear. It was created by William Blinn and produced by Spelling-Goldberg Productions. Sony TV owns the rights to the Spelling-Goldberg catalogue, including
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Eight Is Enough: The Final Episode Aired 35 Years Ago

Remember Eight is Enough? The classic ABC series aired its final episode 35 years ago today.Developed by William Blinn, the dramedy followed the lives of newspaper columnist Tom Bradford (Dick Van Patten) and his eight children. The cast also included Diana Hyland, Betty Buckley, Grant Goodeve, Lani O'Grady, Laurie Walters, Susan Richardson, Dianne Kay, Connie Needham, Willie Aames, and Adam Rich.Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

16 Things You Didn't Know About Purple Rain

  • PEOPLE.com
16 Things You Didn't Know About Purple Rain
What do you say about Purple Rain that hasn't already been said? Not only is it one of the greatest music films of all time, but it's one of the defining films of the 1980s and earned Prince an Oscar. The soundtrack spent nearly a full half-year at Number One on the Billboard charts, sold 20 million copies worldwide and won two Grammys. But as with all things Prince, that's not the full story. A number of truly excellent books and articles have been written about the making of Purple Rain, and we're here to share some of the best bits of them with you.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘The Sopranos’ Leads WGA List of Top TV Series

The Writers Guild of America on Sunday unveiled its list of the “101 Best Written TV Series of All Time,” topped by HBO’s “The Sopranos.”

The mob drama created by David Chase (pictured above right with “Sopranos” star James Gandolfini) led the list over such perennial faves as “Seinfeld” (which ranked No. 2), “All in the Family” (No. 4), “Mash” (No. 5) and “The Wire” (No. 9).

On the other end of the list was a three-way tie between the original NBC “Late Night with David Letterman,” FX’s “Louie” and HBO’s intense prison drama “Oz.”

The list, the results of online voting by members of the WGA West and WGA East, immediately spurred debates over the rankings and omissions. The TV tally was a follow-up to the WGA’s “101 Greatest Screenplays” member survey conducted in 2006.

The WGA’s complete list of TV series follows:

1

The Sopranos

HBO

Created by David Chase

2

Seinfeld
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Wgaw to Honor TV Writer Diane English

hollywoodnews.com:Emmy Award-winning Murphy Brown creator Diane English has been named recipient of the Writers Guild of America, West’s 2011 Paddy Chayefsky Laurel Award for Television, honoring lifetime achievement for outstanding television writing. English will be feted, along with other honorees, at the 2011 Writers Guild Awards West Coast ceremony on Saturday, February 5, 2011, in Hollywood.

Diane English is a total class act – a trailblazing, supremely talented writer whose groundbreaking body of work has helped to both equalize and revolutionize television, while raising the bar for insightful, caustic, and moving writing on primetime TV. Her unique voice influenced not only a generation of women writers, but all creative artists who strive to deliver quality work,” said Wgaw President John Wells.

A Wgaw member since 1977, multiple award-winning writer-producer English first began her career at Wnet/13, New York City’s PBS affiliate. She worked first as a story editor for the Theatre in America series,
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

WGA Awards Fete Slumdog, Milk, Mad Men, 30 Rock

  • Digital Media Law
Slumdog Millionaire continued its winning streak this awards season, with Simon Beaufoy winning the 2009 Writers Guild of America award this evening for adapted screenplay. Dustin Lance Black won the award for best original screenplay for Milk. Slumdog has already won DGA, SAG, PGA and Golden Globe awards, and is a multi-award favorite for the Oscars. Milk has won SAG and PGA awards and is also a strong Oscar contender in multiple categories.

On the television side, awards went to the writers of Mad Men (drama), 30 Rock (comedy), Recount and John Adams in long-form categories, and In Treatment, Breaking Bad, and The Simpsons in various other fields. Controversially, among other awards was one for videogame writing (to Star Wars: The Force Unleashed). Some publishers declined to submit their titles for consideration, viewing the award as primarily an organizing tool for a guild seeking to gain a foothold in a non-unionized sector.
See full article at Digital Media Law »

'Slumdog,' 'Milk' win WGA screenplay nods

'Slumdog,' 'Milk' win WGA screenplay nods
Fox Searchlight's Indian drama "Slumdog Millionaire" put another notch in the kudos-season win column Saturday, copping a WGA Award for best adapted screenplay for Simon Beaufoy.

Focus Features' Harvey Milk biopic "Milk," penned by Dustin Lance Black, won best original screenplay.

"This wasn't the easiest movie to produce, you know -- it's pretty gay!" said a grinning Black, who also was honored with the guild's Paul Selvin Award for championing constitutional rights and civil liberties.

Black added that he prayed a lot during the writing of the "Milk" screenplay.

"Mostly, I'll admit, I prayed for a green light," he said. "So I have to thank God, and I want to thank God for making my dreams come true."

In addition to "Milk," nominees in the original screenplay category included "Burn After Reading, "Vicky Cristina Barcelona," The Visitor" and "The Wrestler."

In winning the best-adapted laurels, "Slumdog" overcame competition from
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

William Blinn to receive WGAW lifetime nod

The WGA West will honor William Blinn with its Paddy Chayefsky Laurel Award for Television during the 2009 Writers Guild Awards ceremony Feb. 7.

The guild's highest TV award, the Laurel honors lifetime achievement for outstanding television writing. Blinn will join the ranks of Rod Serling, Norman Lear, Steven Bochco, Susan Harris, Stephen J. Cannell, John Wells and last year's honoree, David Chase.

Blinn's five-decade resume includes the TV longform projects "Roots," "Brian's Song" and "The Boys Next Door" and such series as "The New Land," "Fame," "Eight Is Enough," "Starsky & Hutch," "Gunsmoke," "Bonanza," "My Favorite Martian" and "Rawhide." He also co-wrote the hit 1984 Prince film "Purple Rain."

Blinn has been nominated for five Emmys and six Writers Guild Awards, winning two of each. He also won a Peabody Award for "Brian's Song" and the Humanitas Prize for "Roots."

"William Blinn's writing changed the face of television," Wgaw president Patric Verrone said.
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Starsky & Hutch

Starsky & Hutch
Opens Friday, February 27

For his follow-up to "Old School", director Todd Phillips has literally gone old school -- giving a comedy fuel injection to the mack daddy of 1970s cop shows (sorry, "Baretta"), "Starsky and Hutch".

The end result, which has gained an ampersand in the process, finds Phillips' comedy street cred (he also was responsible for 2000's "Road Trip") reasonably intact, and if it doesn't hit as many inspired highs as last year's smash, it still cruises along agreeably on the easy chemistry between Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson, who step in where Paul Michael Glaser and David Soul left off.

It's definitely a lot more fun than the last "Charlie's Angels" picture, another big-screen redo of a '70s Spelling-Goldberg production which has managed to occupy a place in the collective pop culture psyche.

Expect a huge payoff and at least one sequel for the Warner Bros. release (Dimension Pictures has it internationally), which will see Stiller build on that "Along Came Polly" momentum, while Wilson will be able to rebound from "The Big Bounce" and "I Spy".

Effectively laying down the groundwork for the enduring odd couple buddy cop vehicle, the ABC series, which originally aired between 1975-1979, served up a smooth mix of character-driven banter and gritty action.

It was ultimately deemed a little too gritty for the network's tastes, which ordered the violence toned down for the 1977-78 season.

No worries for the kinder, gentler, funnier 2004 version, in which Stiller's feverishly devoted, quick tempered Detective David Starsky is partnered with Wilson's more laidback, rules-bending Detective Ken "Hutch" Hutchinson in the investigation of a Bay City murder.

The trail of clues soon lead them to Reese Feldman (Vince Vaughn), a sadistic, polyester-clad businessman who has found a way to make cocaine undetectable by taste or smell.

But it will take more than a trunkful of disguises and a few spins in their trusty Ford Gran Torino (aka the Red Tomato) to successfully nail Feldman before he pulls off the biggest drug deal in the greater Bay City area.

Stiller has put his skills as an astute mimic to good use here, capturing the original Starsky's caffeine-enhanced body language. Wilson, on the other hand, is essentially playing his surfer-boy-self here, but it serves the character well, and after appearing in something like half a dozen movies together, the two have an easy give-and-take that's more Hope and Crosby than Matthau and Lemmon.

The smart casting also applies to the effectively utilized presence of Snoop Dogg, who neatly slides into Antonio Fargas' slick shoes as fly informant Huggy Bear.

Also popping up are Will Ferrell as a jailed associate of Vaughn's with a dragon fetish, Juliette Lewis as Vaughn's naive girlfriend on the side, Jason Bateman as his lackey and Amy Smart and Carmen Electra as a pair of Bay City cheerleaders with a thing for cops.

Even the original Starsky and Hutch put in a final act appearance, and while the former looks more or less the same, the latter is barely recognizable from his "Don't Give up on Us" days.

Phillips, who contributed to the script along with his writing partner Scot Armstrong and John O'Brien, keeps things clicking at a suitably low-tech pace, although some sharper actual writing and a little less improvising would have helped the picture over a few sluggish spots.

Behind-the-scenes, the '70s live again thanks to production designer Edward Verreaux's authentic interiors, costume designer Louise Mingenbach's shudder-inducing threads and Theodore Shapiro's evocative score which doesn't skimp on the wah-wah guitar.

Starsky & Hutch

Warner Bros.

Warner Bros. Pictures and Dimension Films present a Riche-Ludwig/Weed Road/Red Hour production of a Todd Phillips movie

Credits:

Director: Todd Phillips

Screenwriters: John O'Brien, Todd Phillips, Scot Armstrong

Story by: Stevie Long, John O'Brien

Based on characters created by: William Blinn

Producers: William Blinn, Stuart Cornfeld, Akiva Goldsman, Tony Ludwig, Alan Riche

Executive producer: Gilbert Adler

Director of photography: Barry Peterson

Production designer: Edward Verreaux

Editor: Leslie Jones

Costume designer: Louise Mingenbach

Music: Theodore Shapiro

Cast:

Detective David Starsky: Ben Stiller

Detective Ken Hutchinson: Owen Wilson

Reese Feldman: Vince Vaughn

Kitty: Juliette Lewis

Huggy Bear: Snoop Dogg

Police Capt. Dobey: Fred Williamson

Staci: Carmen Electra

Holly: Amy Smart

Running time -- 100 minutes

MPAA rating: PG-13

Starsky & Hutch

Starsky & Hutch
Opens Friday, February 27

For his follow-up to "Old School", director Todd Phillips has literally gone old school -- giving a comedy fuel injection to the mack daddy of 1970s cop shows (sorry, "Baretta"), "Starsky and Hutch".

The end result, which has gained an ampersand in the process, finds Phillips' comedy street cred (he also was responsible for 2000's "Road Trip") reasonably intact, and if it doesn't hit as many inspired highs as last year's smash, it still cruises along agreeably on the easy chemistry between Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson, who step in where Paul Michael Glaser and David Soul left off.

It's definitely a lot more fun than the last "Charlie's Angels" picture, another big-screen redo of a '70s Spelling-Goldberg production which has managed to occupy a place in the collective pop culture psyche.

Expect a huge payoff and at least one sequel for the Warner Bros. release (Dimension Pictures has it internationally), which will see Stiller build on that "Along Came Polly" momentum, while Wilson will be able to rebound from "The Big Bounce" and "I Spy".

Effectively laying down the groundwork for the enduring odd couple buddy cop vehicle, the ABC series, which originally aired between 1975-1979, served up a smooth mix of character-driven banter and gritty action.

It was ultimately deemed a little too gritty for the network's tastes, which ordered the violence toned down for the 1977-78 season.

No worries for the kinder, gentler, funnier 2004 version, in which Stiller's feverishly devoted, quick tempered Detective David Starsky is partnered with Wilson's more laidback, rules-bending Detective Ken "Hutch" Hutchinson in the investigation of a Bay City murder.

The trail of clues soon lead them to Reese Feldman (Vince Vaughn), a sadistic, polyester-clad businessman who has found a way to make cocaine undetectable by taste or smell.

But it will take more than a trunkful of disguises and a few spins in their trusty Ford Gran Torino (aka the Red Tomato) to successfully nail Feldman before he pulls off the biggest drug deal in the greater Bay City area.

Stiller has put his skills as an astute mimic to good use here, capturing the original Starsky's caffeine-enhanced body language. Wilson, on the other hand, is essentially playing his surfer-boy-self here, but it serves the character well, and after appearing in something like half a dozen movies together, the two have an easy give-and-take that's more Hope and Crosby than Matthau and Lemmon.

The smart casting also applies to the effectively utilized presence of Snoop Dogg, who neatly slides into Antonio Fargas' slick shoes as fly informant Huggy Bear.

Also popping up are Will Ferrell as a jailed associate of Vaughn's with a dragon fetish, Juliette Lewis as Vaughn's naive girlfriend on the side, Jason Bateman as his lackey and Amy Smart and Carmen Electra as a pair of Bay City cheerleaders with a thing for cops.

Even the original Starsky and Hutch put in a final act appearance, and while the former looks more or less the same, the latter is barely recognizable from his "Don't Give up on Us" days.

Phillips, who contributed to the script along with his writing partner Scot Armstrong and John O'Brien, keeps things clicking at a suitably low-tech pace, although some sharper actual writing and a little less improvising would have helped the picture over a few sluggish spots.

Behind-the-scenes, the '70s live again thanks to production designer Edward Verreaux's authentic interiors, costume designer Louise Mingenbach's shudder-inducing threads and Theodore Shapiro's evocative score which doesn't skimp on the wah-wah guitar.

Starsky & Hutch

Warner Bros.

Warner Bros. Pictures and Dimension Films present a Riche-Ludwig/Weed Road/Red Hour production of a Todd Phillips movie

Credits:

Director: Todd Phillips

Screenwriters: John O'Brien, Todd Phillips, Scot Armstrong

Story by: Stevie Long, John O'Brien

Based on characters created by: William Blinn

Producers: William Blinn, Stuart Cornfeld, Akiva Goldsman, Tony Ludwig, Alan Riche

Executive producer: Gilbert Adler

Director of photography: Barry Peterson

Production designer: Edward Verreaux

Editor: Leslie Jones

Costume designer: Louise Mingenbach

Music: Theodore Shapiro

Cast:

Detective David Starsky: Ben Stiller

Detective Ken Hutchinson: Owen Wilson

Reese Feldman: Vince Vaughn

Kitty: Juliette Lewis

Huggy Bear: Snoop Dogg

Police Capt. Dobey: Fred Williamson

Staci: Carmen Electra

Holly: Amy Smart

Running time -- 100 minutes

MPAA rating: PG-13

Electra falling for 'Hutch' in Warners redo

Electra falling for 'Hutch' in Warners redo
Carmen Electra is in negotiations to join the cast of Warner Bros. Pictures' big-screen adaptation of the classic 1970s police action series Starsky and Hutch for director Todd Phillips. The project goes into production today. Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson will star as the cop duo who race around the city in a bright red hot rod and report to their never-happy boss, Capt. Dobey. Huggy Bear (Snoop Dogg) is the duo's flamboyant street informant. Electra will play Hutch's (Wilson) girlfriend. Stuart Cornfeld, Akiva Goldsman, Tony Ludwig, Alan Riche and William Blinn are producing the project. Stiller and Gil Adler are executive producing. Steve Long, John O'Brien, Phillips and Scott Armstrong wrote the screenplay. Electra, repped by UTA and Untitled Entertainment, has appeared in such films as Sol Goode, Get Over It and Scary Movie. She most recently appeared on television in Baywatch: Hawaiian Wedding.

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