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Michael Ian Black Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trivia (14) | Personal Quotes (35)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 12 August 1971Chicago, Illinois, USA
Birth NameMichael Schwartz
Height 5' 10" (1.78 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Michael Ian Black was born in Chicago, Illinois, but his family moved to Hillsborough, New Jersey, when he was young. His parents divorced when he was 3. When he was 12, his father died during neurological surgery following a mysterious assault.

Michael attended New York University's Tisch School of the Arts but left before graduation. It was there he met and joined the core group of the comedy group "The State", who had a short run with their own MTV show, The State (1993), before attempting a move to CBS in the mid-1990s; their make-or-break Halloween special fell short of expectations, and a CBS series never came into fruition. Since then Black has appeared as a regular on Comedy Central's Reno 911! (2003) starring Thomas Lennon, Robert Ben Garant and Kerri Kenney.

In addition to his regular television appearances, he also performs in the comedy group Stella (2005) with fellow State alumni Michael Showalter and David Wain.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Bethany

Spouse (1)

Martha Hagen (17 October 1998 - present) (2 children)

Trivia (14)

Was the voice of the pets.com sock puppet.
Son, Elijah, born 2001.
Attended New York University but left before graduating.
He is a middle child with an older sibling (brother) and a younger sibling (sister).
Was not the original choice to play Phil Stubbs on NBC's Ed (2000); fellow I Love the '80s (2002) commentator Donal Logue played the role in the first episode, but backed out due to scheduling conflicts. Donal Logue appeared in the early promotion for the series but the first episodes were re-shot to include Black.
Has a daughter, Ruth, born 2003. She makes an appearance in the Stella (2005) short "Friendship."
His birth name, Schwartz, is derived from the German word "schwarz," which has the same meaning as his stage name, Black. He has joked that he dropped the name Schwartz because "I'm ashamed of my Jewishness." However, the comedy group Stella (2005)'s uniting theme is the 3 members' Jewishness (Black, Michael Showalter, and David Wain).
Real name is Michael Ian Schwartz, but changed his name to Michael Ian Black because there was already a popular actor named Michael Schwartz.
Is currently a member of the comedy troupe Stella (2005) with David Wain and Michael Showalter. They were all cast members on "The State". Stella played weekly shows at Fez Under Time Cafe in NYC until the Fez closed on February 1st, 2005.
Lives in Connecticut with his wife, Martha Hagen, and their two children.
Release of his book, "My Custom Van: And 50 Other Mind-blowing Essays That Will Blow Your Mind All Over Your Face".
Release of his children's book, "Chicken Cheeks: The Beginning of the Ends".
Added his middle name, Ian, because there was already an actor named "Michael Black".
While a guest on "Live with Regis & Kelly" in 2010, Bradley Cooper was asked which of the many actresses he has co-starred with was his favorite on-screen kisser. Instead of an actress, he chose Michael Ian Black, with whom he shared a love scene in Wet Hot American Summer (2001).

Personal Quotes (35)

I honestly believe you can never tell if a relationship is going to last. In my own marriage, which is going on 14 years, I don't think of it as 'I'm going to be with this person forever.' Instead, I think of more like, 'I'll probably be with this person for the next six weeks. Then I'll re-evaluate.'
Everybody has something they love to do. Do that thing.
Lordy, lordy, lordy do I love money. It is a character flaw, no doubt, one that springs from a panicked childhood in which I always felt as if our family was only a couple missed child support payments from being tossed onto the pitiless streets of our suburban New Jersey town.
Well, I think my stand-up is often kind of visual. Not like Carrot Top visual, but visual.
Separation is the worst. There's no good way to deal with it, other than to get on the phone and do Skype and try to visit.
Nothing is more satisfying to me than sitting in a dank room, hunched over a single flickering candle like Ebenezer Scrooge, and watching my ledgers fill themselves with ink.
Whenever anyone asks me if I'm from a TV show, I say yes - no matter whether I've ever been on it. It just makes the conversation that much easier.
I have a good family and I like to be home with them. The older I get, the lazier I get, and the more content I am to sit at home and eat string cheese.
I actually don't know anyone who wants to be famous for fame's sake, at least not anyone I respect. But you need to have a certain amount of power in order to be able to do what you want.
Let me tell you, the life of a C list celebrity is pretty sweet. If I want to go to an Applebee's, all I have to do is, literally, walk in the door. They seat me as soon as the other people ahead of me are seated.
I loved 'Dungeons & Dragons.' Actually, not so much the actual playing as the creation of characters and the opportunity to roll twenty-sided dice. I loved those pouches of dice Dungeon Masters would trundle around, loved choosing what I was going to be: warrior, wizard, dwarf, thief.
I am not a music snob. If anything, my musical taste is bad by any critical standards.
I don't watch that much comedy. I think it's professional jealousy. That and a lack of support for my community.
My tastes in all things lean towards the arty and boring. I like sports documentaries about Scrabble players, bands that play quiet, unassuming music, and TV shows that win awards. In that way, I am an elitist snob.
I feel like my career has been a series of glowing obituaries.
My absolute favorite growing up was 'Super Friends.' The assemblage of so many mighty heroes in one place was, to me, mind-blowing. It was Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Flash, Aquaman, and then sometimes Hawkman and some other, lesser heroes.
All the work that I do, whether or not it ends up being commercially successful or not, feels like the most important thing to me while I'm doing it. I try to take something away from every project, and so they all feel like milestones for one reason or another.
The thing that I think is the most important is taking moments to express your appreciation to your partner. A thank you or a quick kiss can go a long way toward affirming your relationship and commitment to each other. That's not hard to do even when you're juggling insane careers and three kids.
Your harshest critic is always going to be yourself. Don't ignore that critic but don't give it more attention than it deserves.
There is no word for feeling nostalgic about the future, but that's what a parent's tears often are, a nostalgia for something that has not yet occurred. They are the pain of hope, the helplessness of hope, and finally, the surrender to hope.
I am a poker player, but I am not a good poker player. My favorite game is seven card stud, but I'll play hi/lo, Hold 'em, Razz, etc.
I take it for what it is, and sometimes the criticism is actually useful and constructive and actually informs what I do, but most of the time, it's sort of mindless, or they're receiving something on a different frequency than I was sending it.
People recognize me, but they don't know where from. Today I was in the elevator and somebody asked me if I worked for his company.
Best strategy for a first date is to ask her questions. Just keeping asking her questions about herself. Her life, her job, her friends, her taste in movies and music and everything. People mostly just want to talk about themselves, so let her do that.
I don't think I was awake for much of my childhood. I did a lot of napping. This might have been a defensive measure against encroaching depression. Until about the age of eleven or twelve, I had zero interests other than trying to steal gumballs from supermarket gumball machines.
Many, many people can write books. I just happen to be one of them.
At this point, I feel fairly comfortable in terms of performance. I think having a sketch background actually helps a lot. Because my background is acting, and stand-up, in a lot of ways, is acting.
I think people hate me pretty much across the board, which is nice. I mean, it's a pretty evenhanded loathing among a certain amount of the critical population, which used to be about 80 percent. So now I've gotten to the point where I just don't worry about it that much. It used to be very upsetting, now it's only mildly upsetting.
There's this misconception that comedy and music go together. They don't. Comedians can't compete with rock stars; they're just not on the same level. Rock stars will always be cooler. They will always get more girls.
I definitely script things out. I definitely write things down and try to write jokes. Often, they're terrible. I often write terrible, terrible jokes.
Wish I could, through my own financial prestidigitation, transform a dollar bill into two, or two million. It is an awesome and mysterious skill.
My first real break was when my college sketch troupe, The State, was asked to contribute pieces for a new MTV show called 'You Wrote It, You Watch It.'
Most of the time, you don't win anything on reality shows. You're booted off, or maybe you win $50,000, or $100,000, which isn't really life-changing. I don't know that it's worth it.
Corporations do a lot of things well, but not run nations, for obvious reasons.
If you get an idea, you might as well stick with it until somebody calls you on it.

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