News

Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams episode 4 review: Crazy Diamond

Louisa Mellor Oct 8, 2017

Crazy’s the right word for it. Electric Dreams delivers its most unusual, packed episode yet…

This review contains spoilers.

See related Star Trek: Discovery episode 3 review - Context Is For Kings Star Trek: Discovery episode 2 review - Battle At The Binary Star Star Trek: Discovery episode 1 review - The Vulcan Hello

1.4 Crazy Diamond

Forty-four novels, one hundred and twenty-one short stories, six published volumes of correspondence… nobody could ever say Philip K. Dick lacked for ideas. The same goes for this week’s Electric Dreams, which is, to use a technical term, chocka. There’s environmental collapse, a dystopian level of state control, widespread infertility, implanted consciousnesses, maritime-themed sci-fi architecture, Julia Davis, a gang of piratic teddy boys, Syd Barrett, and a race of chimeric pig-people.

And that’s before the plot even kicks in. Crazy Diamond has packed its hour of screen-time to the rafters.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Lenny Abrahamson's 'The Little Stranger' starts UK shoot

  • ScreenDaily
Lenny Abrahamson's 'The Little Stranger' starts UK shoot
Domhnall Gleeson and Charlotte Rampling star in period ghost story.

Principal photography is underway in the UK on The Little Stranger, Lenny Abrahamson’s first feature since he was Oscar-nominated for Room.

Shooting will take place in various locations outside of London and in Yorkshire for roughly 10 weeks.

Starring Domhnall Gleeson, Ruth Wilson, Will Poulter and Charlotte Rampling, the film is a period ghost story that follows a doctor who, during a hot summer in 1948, is called to treat a patient at a haunted country house.

Pathé will distribute the film in the UK, France and Switzerland. Focus Features acquired further territories from Pathé and will release in the Us, with Universal Pictures International handling the rest of the world.

Producers are Gail Egan and Andrea Calderwood for Potboiler Productions - which developed the project with Film4 - alongside Ed Guiney for Element Pictures

Executive producers are Cameron McCracken for Pathé, Daniel Battsek for [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Karlovy Vary Film Review: ‘A Date for Mad Mary’

Karlovy Vary Film Review: ‘A Date for Mad Mary’
Perhaps not the most original film you’ll see all year, but very possibly the most instantly lovable, first-time filmmaker Darren Thornton’s beautifully performed, warm yet melancholic “A Date for Mad Mary” proves that “Sing Street” director John Carney does not have the Irish monopoly on highly exportable rite-of-passage dramedies. And in Seána Kerslake’s performance as the eponymous Mary (“mad” being used in its semi-admiring, semi-cautionary Irish vernacular form) he may even have an ace that Carney’s ensemble picture lacks: a barnstorming central performance, full of light and shade, that should by rights be the breakthrough Kerslake has deserved since her debut in Kirsten Sheridan’s bafflingly underseen “Dollhouse.”

Seldom have the familiar beats of the transition-to-adulthood story felt more engaging, perhaps because Thornton knows his material inside out: Having directed the Yasmine Akram play “10 Dates for Mad Mary” for stage, he has now, together with his brother Colin,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

British Academy Television Craft Awards 2014: Winners Announced!

One of the most vital cogs in the television machine is the people who make it all come to life so, as every year, we’d all like to pass on our huge congratulations to all those who picked up an award last night at the BAFTA Television Craft Awards! It was hosted by Stephen Mangan at The Brewery, City of London for the second year running where presenters included Lennie James, Kara Tointon, Emilia Fox, Arthur Darvill, Patsy Palmer, Victoria Wood and Reece Shearsmith.

Reaffirming the strength and depth of talent working in the British television industry today, a wide range of outstanding television was recognised across the awards with no single programme dominating the ceremony. Historical gangster epic Peaky Blinders received two BAFTAs, one for Otto Bathurst, winning the award for Director: Fiction, and one for George Steel, winning for Photography & Lighting: Fiction. An Adventure in Space and Time,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Mister John – review

Aidan Gillen excels as a man stepping into his dead brother's shoes in this eerie, Singapore-set drama

The first feature film from writer/ director team Christine Molloy and Joe Lawlor was Helen, a breathtaking examination of fluid identity about a young woman playing a missing girl in a police reconstruction. There are clear comparisons with this eerie second feature, in which Aidan Gillen's listless Gerry Devine travels to Singapore in the wake of his brother's death, and winds up wearing his clothes, living in his house, and perhaps rekindling his watery ghost. The dreamy visuals of Ole Birkeland's slowly panning cameras are once again to the fore, conjuring a world of tactile significance in which meaning hovers constantly at the edge of the frame. Gillen is great, his laconic stance thrown off-balance by tragedy, his face apparently struggling to find itself, uncertain of its own expression. Stephen McKeon's score is spine-tingling too,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Mister John – review

Aidan Gillen excels as a man stepping into his dead brother's shoes in this eerie, Singapore-set drama

The first feature film from writer/ director team Christine Molloy and Joe Lawlor was Helen, a breathtaking examination of fluid identity about a young woman playing a missing girl in a police reconstruction. There are clear comparisons with this eerie second feature, in which Aidan Gillen's listless Gerry Devine travels to Singapore in the wake of his brother's death, and winds up wearing his clothes, living in his house, and perhaps rekindling his watery ghost. The dreamy visuals of Ole Birkeland's slowly panning cameras are once again to the fore, conjuring a world of tactile significance in which meaning hovers constantly at the edge of the frame. Gillen is great, his laconic stance thrown off-balance by tragedy, his face apparently struggling to find itself, uncertain of its own expression. Stephen McKeon's score is spine-tingling too,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Eiff 2013: 'Mister John' review

  • CineVue
★★★★☆ An exotic thriller ensnared within a Lynchian nightmare of confused identities, Joe Lawlor and Christine Molloy's follow-up to Helen (2008), Mister John (2013), is a physically and emotionally draining tale of grief, rejection and the yearning to reinvent oneself. When Gerry Devine (Aidan Gillen) hears of the tragic news of his brother's death, he rushes out to Singapore to help with the funeral arrangements. In an odd way, he's thankful of the break, with his marriage going through a particularly tempestuous patch. Once in Singapore, Gerry finds a world of enticing riches and begins to imagine what life would be like here.

Helping his brother's wife, Kim (Zoe Tay), tie-up the loose ends of his bar business, Gerry begins to cogitate on how comfortable this foreign world actually feels, slowly slipping into his brother's former life - at first physically, then psychologically - before spiralling into an inebriated pit of discombobulation.
See full article at CineVue »

See also

Credited With | External Sites