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Ricardo Darín to be honoured with Silver Shell by Amber Wilkinson - 2017-06-24 17:31:12

Ricardo Darín in The Summit Argentinian star Ricardo Darín will receive a Donostia Award on September 26 at the 65th edition of the San Sebastian Festival, in the framework of presentation of his latest film The Summit (La cordillera). The award recognises the career of the 60-year-old star, who has worked with filmmakers including Adolfo Aristarain, Juan José Campanella, Fabián Bielinsky, Fernando Trueba, Pablo Trapero and Cesc Gay.

The Summit, written and directed by Santiago Mitre, is set at a Latin American presidential summit in Chile. Darín stars alongside Dolores Fonzi, Érica Rivas, Elena Anaya, Daniel Giménez Cacho, Alfredo Castro, Paulina García and Christian Slater. It had it's premiere in the Un Certain Regard section in Cannes.

Darín is a regular attender of San Sebastian and has already been honoured by the festival, taking home the acting Silver Shell in 2015 for [filmid=28105]Truman/film], about a terminally ill man spending four days with a friend.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

San Sebastian: Ricardo Darín To Be Honored at San Sebastian

San Sebastian: Ricardo Darín To Be Honored at San Sebastian
Barcelona – Argentina’s Ricardo Darín will receive the San Sebastian Film Festival’s Donostia Award for career achievement on Sept. 26. The prize is the highest distinction given by the highest-profile fest in the Spanish-speaking world.

The Donostia Award was launched in 1986 and began by recognizing stars from Hollywood classic era –Gregory Peck, Bette Davis, Glenn Ford– to later expand to eminent and far more recent U.S, and European figures such as Al Pacino, Michael Caine and Susan Sarandon.

Buenos Aires-born Darín will receive the award at a presentation of Santiago Mitre’s “The Summit.” Via its Donostia Award, the festival will honor one of most charismatic and well-known of contemporary Latin-American actors who has worked with many of the Spanish-speaking world’s most prestigious filmmakers including Juan José Campanella, Adolfo Aristarain, Pablo Trapero, Fabián Bielinsky, Fernando Trueba, Cesc Gay and Mitre.

Darín is the second Latin-American actor distinguished with the honor, after Benicio del Toro in 2014. Darín’s recognition is in line with San Sebastian aim of strengthening links with Latin America, seen in its thriving Latin-American Co-production Forum, launched by fest director José Luis Rebordinos in 2011.

A co-production between K&S Films and La Union de los Ríos (Argentina), Mod Producciones (Spain) and Maneki Films (France), “The Summit” was also penned by Mitre and offers two intertwining plots –one focused on the personal life of an Argentine president, played by Darin, and the other depicting the political intrigue at a Latin American summit. Alongside Darín, Dolores Fonzi, Érica Rivas, Elena Anaya, Daniel Giménez Cacho and Christian Slater figure in the cast. The feature world premiered in Cannes’ One Certain Regard and is sold by Spain’s Film Factory Entertainment. It will be released in U.S. on Aug. 18 via Warner Bros Pictures International.

Darin’s career dates back to when he was five and began acting in TV series. His international breakthrough came with Fabian Bielinsky’s “Nine Queens.” Some of his most noteworthy performances have been in movies of Juan José Campanella’s, led by “The Secret in Their Eyes” who won a best foreign-language Academy Award). Darin also starred in ”Son of the Bride,” nominated for an Academy Award, ”Moon of Avellaneda,” also from Campanella, Fernando Trueba’s “The Dancer and the Thief,” Sebastián Borenzstein’s “Kóblic,” Damián Szifron’s “Wild Tales” and Pablo Trapero’s “White Elephant.”

Though he can shown large range, if there’s a Darín touch, perhaps its the light and tender irony he gives to many of his characters.

Spanish director Manuel Gutiérrez Aragón said of Darín: “All the characters he plays seem to have been especially written for him and only for him to play them. Darín lends transparency to characters he embodies.”

On of Latin America’s most bankable actors, whose presence can help pre-sell a movie, Darin’s selectiveness with the films he stars in has made his involvement an important pointer to a movie’s quality.

“The Secret of Their Eyes,” earned $6.4 million for Sony Pictures Classics in 2010 and “Wild Tales,” another Sony Pictures Classics pickup accumulated $44 million worldwide, a standout figure for a Spanish-language feature.

Darín took the best actor Silver Shell Award in San Sebastian for Cesc Gay’s “Truman.”

Related storiesCannes Film Review: 'The Summit'Glocal in Progress Launches at 2017 San Sebastian FestivalToulouse 2017 Films in Progress Selects 'Los Perros,' 'Hunting Season,' 'The Desert Bride'
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ricardo Darin thriller inks key deals

  • ScreenDaily
Ricardo Darin thriller inks key deals
Exclusive: Film Sharks scores sales on redemption feature.

Black Snow (Nieve Negra), the thriller starring Argentinian superstar Ricardo Darin who is in official selection at Cannes Film Festival with The Summit (El Cordillera), has sparked a flurry of multi-platform transactions for Film Sharks including a global streaming deal with Netflix.

Fabian Bielinsky protégé Martin Hodara’s film has also gone to DirecTV for Latin American TVoD rights, and as previously announced will open theatrically in Spain through A Contracorriente, and Italy via Movies Inspired.

Paris Films will distribute in Brazil, and Seven Films in Greece. Buena Vista International reported more than 750,000 admissions in South America.

Talks are ongoing for theatrical deals in the UK, Australia, Germany and Scandinavia on the story of a man living in self-imposed exile in Patagonia years after he was accused of killing his brother.

Old rivalries are reignited when he is visited by another brother and his wife with a land sale
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘Black Snow’ (‘Nieve Negra’): Film Review

‘Black Snow’ (‘Nieve Negra’): Film Review
Making his solo directorial debut in Black Snow -- back in 2000, he was assistant director on Fabian Bielinsky’s scam classic Nine Queens, and later co-directed The Signal with Ricardo Darin -- Martin Hodara can’t go too far wrong, since the film's cast features the charismatic likes of Darin, Leonardo Sbaraglia, Federico Luppi and Dolores Fonzi. But though it burns as slowly and intensely as a cabin log fire over its first hour, narrative confusion and implausibility strike over the final run, and it’s that wobbly final stretch that will linger in viewers’ minds, making Snow a less chilling experience than it...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Third Platino Awards to Fete Argentine Star Ricardo Darin

The 3rd Platino Ibero-American Film Awards will fete Argentine star Ricardo Darin with a Lifetime Achievement Prize during its July 24 awards ceremony at Uruguay’s Punta del Este.

Prior recipients of the honour are Brazilian actress Sonia Braga in 2014 and Antonio Banderas in 2015.

With this recognition, the Platino Awards‘ steering committee “aims to praise the honesty, talent and charisma with which (Darin) has brought stature to some of the most recognized Latin American films of the last three decades.”

The Buenos Aires-born thesp, one of Latin America biggest marquee draws, starred in Juan Jose Campanella’s 2010 Oscar-winning “The Secret in Their Eyes,” which Sony Pictures Classics distributed in the U.S., and also toplined Damian Szifron’s 2014 Cannes hit and Oscar-nominee “Wild Tales,” another Sony Pictures Classics pickup which grossed $44 million worldwide, a standout result for a Spanish-language movie.

The Platino Awards organizers highlighted Darin’s “acting versatility and undeniable
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ricardo Darín in Premios Platino honour

  • ScreenDaily
Ricardo Darín in Premios Platino honour
The Argentinian star will collect the lifetime achievement award during the third annual awards gala at the Punta del Este Conventions Centre in Uruguay on July 24.

The awards recognise talent in the cinematic arts in Spanish and Portuguese-language films and according to the selection committee Darin’s hallmarks are the “commitment and hard work of a true craftsman in the art of acting.”

Darín launched his career in El Mismo Amor, La Misma Lluvia in 1999, for which he won the Condor de Plata. The actor earned his second Condor for the Oscar-nominated Son Of The Bride in 2001.

A fruitful collaboration with Juan José Campanella brought international celebrity through a starring role in 2010 best foreign-language Oscar-winner The Secret In Their Eyes, which garnered Darín’s first Premio Sur for best actor from the Argentinian Motion Picture Academy.

He has also starred in Fabián Bielinsky’s thriller Nine Queens, Cesc Gay’s comedy Truman, and [link=nm
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Patagonik, Demente: Chilean Remake of ‘A Boyfriend for My Wife’

Patagonik, Demente: Chilean Remake of ‘A Boyfriend for My Wife’
Two powerhouse shingles from Chile and Argentina have forged a strategic alliance that kicks off with the Chilean remake of Argentine romcom “Un novio para mi mujer” (“A Boyfriend for My Wife”). Demente Contenidos of Chile and Argentina’s Patagonik Film Group have agreed to co-produce a number of films with commercial potential in both territories and beyond.

Patagonik will provide the screenplay as well as part of the financing for production and post-production.

Budgeted at $1 million, the Chilean adaptation of “A Boyfriend for My Wife” will be distributed worldwide by Patagonik; Demente will own the Chilean rights. 20th Century Fox Chile, which released the massive comedy hit “Stefan vs Kramer,” co-helmed and co-produced by Demente CEO Sebastian Freund, is in talks to release the remake in Chile.

A Boyfriend for My Wife” is a 2008 hit directed by Juan Taratuto about a timid husband who hires a professional Lothario to seduce his formidable wife,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Focus Review

Who knew petty crime could be so much fun? Focus, a tale of charming pickpockets, con-men and confidence tricksters, treats theft as an art form. Our hero, Nicky Spurgeon (Will Smith), is essentially an evil Derren Brown. Through a combination of psychological tricks, subconscious programming and old-school grifting, he manipulates his marks so expertly they only notice they’ve been taken for a ride when he’s long gone, if at all.

Focus is a film of two halves, the first taking place in New Orleans over the week of the Super Bowl. With thousands of booze-soaked tourists flocking into town, Nicky spies opportunity. He promptly assembles a professional pickpocket gang that swoops through the streets with clockwork synchronicity. One thief distracts, another removes the mark’s wallet, a third immediately scarpers with the loot. These wallets get funnelled straight to an office complex where they’re stripped of cash,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

FilmSharks readies Hitler’s Steps

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: Guido Rud’s FilmSharks International has prevailed in a bidding war, acquiring feature rights to Abel Basti’s Latin American publishing sensation.

Buenos Aires-based Rud is developing the project with Amsterdam-based European Film Company, the company behind Kidnapping Freddy Heineken that is understood to be bringing equity and soft money to the table.

Rud is aiming for a studio-level feature, preferably in Argentina, and will commence pre-sales at the Afm.

In After Hitler’s Steps Basti produces evidence purporting to show how the Führer survived WWII and fled to Argentina and Paraguay, where he lived until his death in the 1970s.

The world-renowned authority on the Third Reich and the flight of Nazis to Latin America and the Us is adapting the screenplay. His previous work has been acquired by the BBC and he wrote a documentary that aired on History Channel called Hitler’s Escape (El Escape De Hitler).

Producing is Pablo Bossi, Fabian Bielinsky’s producer
See full article at ScreenDaily »

FilmSharks boards After Hitler’s Steps

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: Guido Rud’s FilmSharks International has prevailed in a bidding war, acquiring feature rights to Abel Basti’s Latin American publishing sensation.

Buenos Aires-based Rud is developing the project with Amsterdam-based European Film Company, the company behind Kidnapping Freddy Heineken that is understood to be bringing equity and soft money to the table.

Rud is aiming for a studio-level feature, preferably in Argentina, and will commence pre-sales at the Afm.

In After Hitler’s Steps Basti produces evidence purporting to show how the Führer survived WWII and fled to Argentina and Paraguay, where he lived until his death in the 1970s.

The world-renowned authority on the Third Reich and the flight of Nazis to Latin America and the Us is adapting the screenplay. His previous work has been acquired by the BBC and he wrote a documentary that aired on History Channel called Hitler’s Escape (El Escape De Hitler).

Producing is Pablo Bossi, Fabian Bielinsky’s producer
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Light emerging from the shadows: Sos staff members share their thoughts on noir

Film noir. What is it? What are its defining characteristics? What films best express its qualities? Sex appeal, violence, cynicism, anti-heroes, femmes fatales, bleak commentary on modern society, maddening twists of fate that perpetuate one’s misery, running away from danger yet never making any ground…noir is and represents a wide variety of things, so much so that film experts do not even agree on whether it is a genre unto itself. (Two of the leading voices, James Ursini and Alain Silver, agree that it represents a movement rather than a definable genre.) For well over two years now, Sound on Sight has hosted the Friday Noir column which, on a near-weekly basis, has covered a great many noir entries of the commonly recognized classic period (1941 to 1959) as well as sizable portion of neo-noirs. Slowly and steadily, the column has explored the extremely exhaustive catalogue of titles with still many to come.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Cinema at the Margins

Wheeler Winston Dixon’s Cinema at the Margins is an enlightening collection of essays and interviews. Wearing his encyclopedic knowledge lightly, Dixon shares his expert insights and research in an eloquent, eminently readable style. I chose to review his new book because its reference to the ‘margins’ held the enticing promise of new discoveries, and a brief survey of its table of contents confirmed that, alongside well-known and much-loved names, there were also unfamiliar ones. The volume covers an early film by Peter Bogdanovich, the horror movies of Lucio Fulci, American 1930s and 40s science fiction serials, the TV series Dragnet, the brief career of Argentine director Fabián Bielinsky and the long one of Hollywood director Sam Newfield, Robert Bresson’s Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne (1945), U.S. 1960s experimental cinema, Dixon’s own meditation on the shift to digital, and interviews with music video director Dale “Rage” Resteghini,
See full article at The Moving Arts Journal »

Lisbon & Estoril 2013 Review: Viola Is A Strange, Audacious Little Film From Argentina

The always interesting and exciting Argentinean cinema has been known for its very gritty realism and tight grip on the country's social and economic issues. Filmmakers like Fabián Bielinsky, Juan José Campanella and Lucía Puenzo lead with polished, socially invested productions. And then there's Lucrecia Martel and Matías Piñeiro, members of a group of young filmmakers who comprise an Argentinean New Wave of some kind and couldn't care less about mainstream drama where tragedy occurs and people learn and tears are shed. They seem to be more interesting in twisting narrative forms and playing around - which is the way anything remotely original tends to happen, really. Piñeiro's Viola is a very strange, puzzling film about women, love and... actresses, I suppose. Clearly an independent...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Director & Actor Teams: The Overlooked & Underrated (Part 2 of 2)

Following are some supplemental sections featuring notable director & actor teams that did not meet the criteria for the main body of the article. Some will argue that a number of these should have been included in the primary section but keep in mind that film writing on any level, from the casual to the academic, is a game of knowledge and perception filtered through personal taste.

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Other Notable Director & Actor Teams

This section is devoted to pairings where the duo worked together at least 3 times with the actor in a major role in each feature film, resulting in 1 must-see film.

Terence Young & Sean Connery

Must-See Collaboration: From Russia with Love (1962).

Other Collaborations: Action of the Tiger (1957), Dr. No (1962), Thunderball (1965).

Director Young and actor Connery teamed up to create one of the very best Connery-era James Bond films with From Russia with Love which features a great villainous performance by Robert Shaw
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Hot Button Misdirection: ‘After Earth’ and ‘Now You See Me’ Faked Us Out on the Issues

This weekend’s two major openers had something in common: each deceived us as far as being relevant to current hot-button issues. It’s a strange thing to fake, I know. Marketing mainstream Hollywood fare as having political messages would seem to be misguided. And the fact that both were sort of a misdirection anyway, that probably annoyed anyone who would go to see After Earth or Now You See Me because of the promise of substantial contemporary context. I can’t be the only person who is more interested in studio pictures when they at least address if not also deal with real world problems. I even went to see the Fright Night remake specifically because it incorporated some commentary on the housing crisis and its significance in Las Vegas. Now You See Me sold me similarly on its consideration of the Great Recession and banking crisis. I thought this could be the most timely heist
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Ricardo Darin’s B.O. Appeal Proves Inter-Continental

Ricardo Darin’s B.O. Appeal Proves Inter-Continental
Madrid – Universal Pictures Intl.’s “Thesis on a Homicide” grossed an impressive first-week take of Euros755,844 ($992,423) off 219 prints over April 5-11 in Spain, vindicating U’s pick-up of the film.

The results were a feat of Darin-do: Ricardo Darin has a big marquee value in his native Argentina, but clearly has a big following in other countries. That’s partly due to his talent and charm, but also in his choice of films. He is known to be discriminating, so his name is a signal of quality.

Darin, 56, is best known for Juan Jose Campanella’s Oscar-winning “The Secret of Their Eyes,” which earned $6.4 million for Sony Pictures Classics in 2010.

“Secret” grossed Euros6.3 million ($8.25 million) for indie distrib Alta Films in Spain in 2009.

Darin has also hitched his wagon to some of Argentina’s finest directorial talent, such as Fabian Bielinsky (“Nine Queens, “El Aura”), Pablo Trapero (“Carancho,” “White Elephant”) and Campanella.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Lead Actors: The Overlooked and Underrated

This article is dedicated to Andrew Copp: filmmaker, film writer, artist and close friend who passed away on January 19, 2013. You are loved and missed, brother.

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Looking at the Best Actor Academy Award nominations for the film year 2012, the one miss that clearly cries out for more attention is Liam Neeson’s powerful performance in Joe Carnahan’s excellent survival film The Grey, easily one of the best roles of Neeson’s career.

In Neeson’s case, his lack of a nomination was a case of neglect similar to the Albert Brooks snub in the Best Supporting Actor category for the film year 2011 for Drive(Nicolas Winding Refn, USA).

Along with negligence, other factors commonly prevent outstanding lead acting performances from getting the kind of critical attention they deserve. Sometimes it’s that the performance is in a film not considered “Oscar material” or even worthy of any substantial critical attention.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

James Marsh Talks Future Projects ‘The Silent Land,’ ‘Valerio,’ and ‘The Aura’

  • The Film Stage
On the occasion of his latest film, Shadow Dancer, hitting Sundance and finding distribution, James Marsh is taking to the publicity circuit to discuss projects both current and future. And, as it so happens, one his stops along the way was ThePlaylist, with whom he shared details on three potential, narrative projects that lie ahead.

One we’re only hearing of now is The Silent Land, which Marsh describes as a “very interesting, unusual supernatural story.” Based on Graham Joyce‘s novel, the story — which has been given a first draft by the director and Nick Drake — follows Jake and Zoe, a married couple who, after digging themselves out from an avalanche, discover that their hotel in the French Pyrenees is empty. That’s bad enough; but there’s also a complete silence in the area, any sort of communication is dead, and another avalanche is coming. After a series
See full article at The Film Stage »

Erik Matti Vaults Into The A-List With Ojt

Filipino director Erik Matti has long been a favorite of this site, his films consistently charming with their unique sense of style and energy.  But as much as we may argue that films like superhero riff Gagamboy or atmospheric chiller Pa-Siyam are fun films - which they very definitely are - the realities of the system that Matti has been forced to work within have largely meant that while his films are consistently fun they are very seldom what would be called good, at least not good in the big, serious arthouse definition of the word.  Only once that I'm aware of in his career - with the gritty drama Prosti - has Matti really been able to showcase the serious craftsman in him and that film has been seen by so tragically few people that it hardly counts.

This is about to change.

When posting the trailer for Matti's
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

'Aura,' 'Law' have date at IFC

'Aura,' 'Law' have date at IFC
IFC Entertainment has acquired two films that will be distributed in the coming months by its day-and-date distribution banner. IFC First Take Films will release Argentinean helmer Fabian Bielinsky's El Aura and fellow countryman Daniel Burman's Derecho de familia -- both slated to bow this year. IFC Entertainment has been a trailblazer in the day-and-date field. IFC First Take, launched in January, acquires and distributes 24 films a year, releases them nationwide and simultaneously offers them on-demand to cable subscribers. The films are available on Cablevision and Comcast services on IFC in Theaters.
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