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Zelig; Hannah and Her Sisters – review

Woody Allen was back on form in 2011 with Midnight in Paris, and this week sees the welcome return to the big screen (though initially only at BFI South Bank) of two of the five masterpieces he made in consecutive years during the mid-1980s. Zelig (1983) is a brilliant riff on America's permanent identity crisis, the national belief in the ability to reinvent the self, and it takes the form of a wholly fake, but completely convincing documentary of a fictive inter-war celebrity, Leonard Zelig, known as "the human chameleon". Shot in black-and-white except for the commentaries on the Zelig affair by Saul Bellow, Susan Sontag, Irving Howe and Bruno Bettelheim, it's also a brilliant satirical history of America in the 1930s and 40s.

Arguably Allen's wittiest disquisition on life, love and death in Manhattan, Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) is beneficially influenced by Bergman's Fanny and Alexander. One of his most subtly plotted pictures,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Zelig/Hannah and Her Sisters – review

Woody Allen was back on form in 2011 with Midnight in Paris, and this week sees the welcome return to the big screen (though initially only at BFI South Bank) of two of the five masterpieces he made in consecutive years during the mid-1980s. Zelig (1983) is a brilliant riff on America's permanent identity crisis, the national belief in the ability to re-invent the self, and it takes the form of a wholly fake, but completely convincing documentary of a fictive inter-war celebrity, Leonard Zelig, known as "the human chameleon". Shot in black-and-white except for the commentaries on the Zelig affair by Saul Bellow, Susan Sontag, Irving Howe and Bruno Bettelheim, it's also a brilliant satirical history of America in the 1930s and 40s.

Arguably Allen's wittiest disquisition on life, love and death in Manhattan, Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) is beneficially influenced by Bergman's Fanny and Alexander. One of his most subtly plotted pictures,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Catherine Hardwicke Talks Red Riding Hood

  • HeyUGuys
In addition to speaking to Amanda Seyfried about her role as Valerie in Red Riding Hood, HeyUGuys recently caught up with the film’s director, Catherine Hardwicke. Not only did Hardwicke discuss the film in great detail, but she also spoke about how hard it is to get films made, sexism in the film industry and how that affected her attempts to get in the director’s seat for The Fighter.

On the influences behind the film

I’m not so much of a person top go back and look at other movies as much, like when I did 13, I didn’t look at other teenage movies, I looked at a couple of Martin Scorsese and Cassavetti’s to get that gritty reality, so actually in this movie I looked more at paintings, I looked more at paintings of Hieronymus Bosch, from that time period, and try to find the spirit of the people,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

‘Red Riding Hood’ Round Table Interview – Maahin’s Report

Amanda Seyfried, Shiloh Fernandez, Max Irons, Adrian Holmes, with director Catherine Hardwicke were in London to promote their new film Red Riding Hood, a twist on the well known fairytale, and we were invited along to a special round table with the cast and crew.

First up were director Catherine Hardwicke, and Adrian Holmes who plays the Captain.

What did you think was special about this story?

Catherine Hardwicke: Leonardo DiCaprio’s company had written this script, and I guess they thought it would fun and interesting to go back to the original roots, even before the Brothers Grimm, when there was a werewolf in the story. It is an intricate tale, with different levels of symbolism… so I said ‘Yeah, sign me up!’

Why do you think forbidden love works so well?

Ch: I guess if you have a happy love story then it’s kind of boring!
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

An Interview with Catherine Hardwicke: On the set of 'Red Riding Hood'

Interview by Karen Lam

“I’m late! For a very important date!” I’m channeling the White Rabbit as I gun the car through weekend traffic towards the studio. But when Catherine Hardwicke’s assistant Nikki Ramey ushers me onto the sound stage, I realize this is no Wonderland. Instead, I’ve plunged head-first into a dangerous dreamscape, to the place where real fairy tales live. Where happily-ever-after only happens after surviving a nightmare...

This is the set of Catherine’s newest film, Red Riding Hood.

I stand in the center of a strangely surreal village. High above me, rustic log cottages are elevated on stilts. It’s an architectural paradox: safe, and yet complete unstable. The paranoia and fear are almost palpable. Like something dangerous is lurking just beyond the walls of this wooden fortress.

Nikki guides me to another set, where Grandma’s house will be built. The
See full article at Planet Fury »

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