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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005

14 items from 2014


Carl Bernstein -- I'm Going to Dig Into the Sony Hack Scandal

19 hours ago | TMZ | See recent TMZ news »

Carl Bernstein has some serious questions about Sony's decision to pull "The Interview" from theaters ... and he's planning on digging for answers.The legendary journalist talked to our photog just after the news broke Wednesday afternoon ... saying he hopes Sony made the move because of a credible threat and not out of cowardice.Bernstein said he'll call his sources to find out if Sony was justified based on real threats ... and the guy clearly has sources. »

- TMZ Staff

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Mike Nichols Movies: 18 Essential Films You Should Watch Right Now

20 November 2014 8:30 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Few directors can be said to have changed the way films are made, but Mike Nichols, who died Wednesday at 83, was one of them. His first film, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" (1966), ended decades of Hollywood censorship of adult content and freed the movies for mature language and subject matter ever after. His second film, "The Graduate," was the first serious mainstream movie to feature a rock soundtrack (spawning Simon and Garfunkel's hit "Mrs. Robinson") and, through its casting of Dustin Hoffman, expanded Hollywood's notion of what a leading man ought to look and sound like.

Nichols wasn't born in America (he and his family escaped from Nazi Germany when he was a child), but he was one of the best chroniclers of contemporary America -- its politics, its aspirations, its dreams, its aristocracy, and its successes and failures -- in movies. His youth in Manhattan as the son »

- Gary Susman

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Watergate Editor at the Movies: From 'President's' to Supporting Role in 'Born Yesterday'

6 November 2014 6:11 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ben Bradlee movies: From 'All the President's Men' to 'Born Yesterday' (photo: Jason Robards as 'The Washington Post' executive editor Ben Bradlee in 'All the President's Men') Former Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee aka Benjamin C. Bradlee, best known for his key role in the Watergate scandal that destroyed the Richard Nixon presidency, and who was later played by Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner Jason Robards in Alan J. Pakula's film version of All the President's Men, died of "natural causes" last October 21, 2014, at his home in Washington, D.C. Bradlee, who had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease, was 93. The Washington Post of the 21st century may look increasingly like a more pedantic version of the Rupert Murdoch-owned tabloid New York Post, but things weren't always like that. Back in the days when the American media — at least some of the time — actually bothered reporting news »

- Andre Soares

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Iconic Watergate Team Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward Remember Ben Bradlee (Video)

22 October 2014 6:25 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward remembered their Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee Wednesday following the legendary newspaper editor's death Tuesday. Also read: Ben Bradlee, Washington Post ‘Watergate’ Editor, Dead at 93 “He was a unique editor and a unique person and he viewed the world like the young reporter he started as,” Bernstein said on CNN's “New Day.” His partner on the Watergate story, Woodward, echoed his sentiments. Also read: Robert Redford Launches Production Company With Watergate Documentary “He raised the standards; he was always asking us not what the White House spokesman said, but how about people on the scene like the. »

- Jordan Chariton

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Ben Bradlee, Revered 'Washington Post' Editor, Dies At 93

21 October 2014 9:00 PM, PDT | Uinterview | See recent Uinterview news »

Ben Bradlee, the renowned editor of the Washington Post, died on Oct. 21 at his home in Washington, D.C., after a battle with Alzheimer’s. He was 93.

Ben Bradlee Dies

The Washington Post, the paper at which Bradlee served as the executive editor for 26 years, confirmed his passing.

Bradlee got his first experience in a newsroom after serving in the Navy during World War II, helping to start the New Hampshire Sunday News. In 1948, he began reporting for the Washington Post. In 1954, after spending a few years as an assistant press attaché at the U.S. Embassy in Paris, he started working as a European correspondent for Newsweek magazine. When the Post bought Newsweek in 1961, Bradlee became the bureau chief.

By 1965, Bradlee had worked his way up to managing editor and just three years later, he’d become the Post’s executive editor – a position he held until 1991. During his »

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'All the President's Men': Read THR's 1976 review

21 October 2014 6:45 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Alan J. Pakula's All The President's Men pulled back the curtain on the investigative team that uncovered the Watergate conspiracy, bringing journalists like Robert Woodward, Carl Bernstein and Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee to the silver screen. On March 25, 1976, The Hollywood Reporter published Arthur Knight's review of the film. From details on the realism of the sets to concerns over the film's budget (an estimated $8.5 million), it's a fascinating look back at one of cinema's greats. The number of American films dealing with political subjects can literally be counted on the fingers on one hand; and up

read more

»

- THR Staff

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Former Washington Post Editor Ben Bradlee Dead at 93

21 October 2014 5:55 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Ben Bradlee, the hard-charging editor who guided The Washington Post through its Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the Watergate scandal and invigorated its newsroom for more than two decades, died Tuesday. He was 93. Bradlee died at his home of natural causes, The Post reported. As managing editor first and later as executive editor, the raspy-voiced Bradlee engineered the transformation of The Post from a sleepy hometown paper into a great national one. He brought in a cast of talented journalists and set editorial standards that brought the paper new respect. Bradlee got an early break as a journalist thanks to his friendship with one president, »

- Associated Press

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Former Washington Post Editor Ben Bradlee Dead at 93

21 October 2014 5:55 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Ben Bradlee, the hard-charging editor who guided The Washington Post through its Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the Watergate scandal and invigorated its newsroom for more than two decades, died Tuesday. He was 93. Bradlee died at his home of natural causes, The Post reported. As managing editor first and later as executive editor, the raspy-voiced Bradlee engineered the transformation of The Post from a sleepy hometown paper into a great national one. He brought in a cast of talented journalists and set editorial standards that brought the paper new respect. Bradlee got an early break as a journalist thanks to his friendship with one president, »

- Associated Press

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'All the President's Men' (1976) - Best Movies #7

6 October 2014 9:30 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

There's no shortage of starting points from which to tackle 1976's All the President's Men, a timeless journalistic procedural that, if watched today, says as much about journalism over 40 years ago as much as it does about journalism today. "I think if Watergate happened today we wouldn't even know about it," said James Carville in Discovery Channel's 2013 retrospective "All the President's Men Revisited". Whether you believe that's the case or not, the idea of Watergate is now more of a punchline than anything else, "-gate" now becoming a suffix used by 24-hour media services to punch up the latest scandal, used for hashtag memes rather than any measure of actual reporting. Now I'm not as cynical when it comes to today's journalism as Carville, but I'm not necessarily too far behind. The idea of true investigative journalism has been placed on the back-burner. The public needs information right now »

- Brad Brevet

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Gordon Willis: Shining a light on Hollywood's 'Prince of Darkness'

19 May 2014 1:02 PM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Often called “The Prince of Darkness” for his tendency to artfully cloak onscreen characters in ominous shadows, cinematographer Gordon Willis was the closest thing Hollywood had to a Rembrandt. His playful visual style, daring use of chiaroscuro, and seemingly effortless ability to conjure a mood of unsettling paranoia made him the ideal Director of Photography for the 1970s — a glorious filmmaking decade when Technicolor artifice was swept aside for New Hollywood naturalism.

Whether working with Francis Ford Coppola on The Godfather saga, Alan J. Pakula on his dizzying Watergate-era conspiracy thrillers All The President’s Men and The Parallax View, »

- Chris Nashawaty

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Movies with perfect pace

2 March 2014 11:54 AM, PST | Shadowlocked | See recent Shadowlocked news »

Movies with perfect pace aren’t those that move quickly or slowly - they’re the ones that move at the right speed for the story being told and the style being used to tell them. There are lots of movies that I love which fail the pace test, including 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Superman (1978), Dawn Of The Dead (1979), Apocalypse Now (1979) and Taxi Driver (1976).

Consider in this list - and those aforementioned that didn’t make it to the finals - that pace is not the only thing a film needs to offer, and that it can still be a terrible film even if it is well-paced. So this is not a collection of ‘best’ movies - it’s a collection of movies with great…

...timing.

Psycho (1960)

What contrasts. What innovation. Hitch’s adaptation of Robert Bloch’s gory, Ed Gein-inspired shocker knows exactly when to speed you uncomfortably to an uncomfortable place, »

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Oscars 2014 will celebrate heroes -- many of whom will likely be in the room

14 January 2014 2:07 PM, PST | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

For this year’s Oscars, it will be an ode to the honorable.

Producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron announced Tuesday that this year’s Academy Awards will have a movie hero theme. Meron made the announcement through an Instagram video saying the night would be a celebration of all heroes: popular heroes, real-life heroes, animated heroes, and superheroes.

Does that mean we can expect host Ellen DeGeneres in a Wonder Woman suit? Probably not. However, many of the stars in contention for Oscars this year have already played heroic parts. Here is a look at some of the best »

- Jake Perlman

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HBO's Winter/Spring Doc Slate Includes 'The Case Against 8,' Doug Block's '112 Weddings'

10 January 2014 9:07 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

HBO has released its doc schedule through the first half of the year, a lineup that includes Doug Block's "112 Weddings" and Ben Cotner and Ryan White's "The Case Against 8." Herblock – The Black & The White (Jan. 27) traces the life of Herbert L. Block, who started cartooning in his teens in Chicago and went on to win four Pulitzer Prizes and the Presidential Medal of Freedom during his 55 years at the Washington Post. For the better part of the 20th century, his cartoons were a must-read for those in Washington and syndicated across the country. Jon Stewart, Carl Bernstein, Bob Woodward, Ben Bradlee, Lewis Black and Tom Brokaw are among those providing insight into Block’s life and career in the documentary, from multiple Emmy® winners Michael Stevens and George Stevens, Jr. Questioning Darwin (Feb. 10) takes an in-depth look at modern-day creationist theory embraced by those who reject evolution, and »

- Alison Willmore

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HBO's Winter/Spring Doc Slate Includes 'The Case Against 8,' Doug Block's '112 Weddings'

10 January 2014 9:07 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

HBO has released its doc schedule through the first half of the year, a lineup that includes Doug Block's "112 Weddings" and Ben Cotner and Ryan White's "The Case Against 8." Herblock – The Black & The White (Jan. 27) traces the life of Herbert L. Block, who started cartooning in his teens in Chicago and went on to win four Pulitzer Prizes and the Presidential Medal of Freedom during his 55 years at the Washington Post. For the better part of the 20th century, his cartoons were a must-read for those in Washington and syndicated across the country. Jon Stewart, Carl Bernstein, Bob Woodward, Ben Bradlee, Lewis Black and Tom Brokaw are among those providing insight into Block’s life and career in the documentary, from multiple Emmy® winners Michael Stevens and George Stevens, Jr. Questioning Darwin (Feb. 10) takes an in-depth look at modern-day creationist theory embraced by those who reject evolution, and »

- Alison Willmore

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005

14 items from 2014


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