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2013 | 2012 | 2010 | 2002

4 items from 2013


Frank Thornton obituary

18 March 2013 5:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Actor best known as the haughty department store supervisor Captain Peacock in the TV comedy Are You Being Served?

The actor Frank Thornton, who has died aged 92, had a flair for comedy derived from the subtle craftsmanship of classical stage work. However, he will be best remembered for his longstanding characters in two popular BBC television comedy series – the sniffily priggish Captain Peacock in Are You Being Served? and the pompous retired policeman Herbert "Truly" Truelove, in Roy Clarke's Last of the Summer Wine.

Robertson Hare, the great Whitehall farceur, told him: "You'll never do any good until you're 40." And, said Thornton, "he was quite right." In the event, he was 51 when David Croft, producer of another long-running British staple, Dad's Army, remembered the tall, long-faced actor from another engagement and decided to cast him as the dapper floor-walker in charge of shop assistants played by Mollie Sugden, Wendy Richard, »

- Carole Woddis

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Frank Thornton obituary

18 March 2013 5:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Actor best known as the haughty department store supervisor Captain Peacock in the TV comedy Are You Being Served?

The actor Frank Thornton, who has died aged 92, had a flair for comedy derived from the subtle craftsmanship of classical stage work. However, he will be best remembered for his longstanding characters in two popular BBC television comedy series – the sniffily priggish Captain Peacock in Are You Being Served? and the pompous retired policeman Herbert "Truly" Truelove, in Roy Clarke's Last of the Summer Wine.

Robertson Hare, the great Whitehall farceur, told him: "You'll never do any good until you're 40." And, said Thornton, "he was quite right." In the event, he was 51 when David Croft, producer of another long-running British staple, Dad's Army, remembered the tall, long-faced actor from another engagement and decided to cast him as the dapper floor-walker in charge of shop assistants played by Mollie Sugden, Wendy Richard, »

- Carole Woddis

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Bob Godfrey was a brilliant cartoonist, delightfully daft and a joy to work with

22 February 2013 11:20 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

I met Bob Godfrey in 1952 when I joined the William Larkin studio in Mayfair. To relieve the boredom of the industrial instructional films we were making, Bob and I started working on cartoon films in his basement in Tufnell Park, north London. In 1955 we left Larkin's and started Biographic Films, specifically to make commercials for ITV. We had the first cartoon commercial on the first night of ITV in September 1955.

For Courage Ales we made a series of live-action ads parodying silent cinema. The commercials, complete with title cards, followed the adventures of a villain, a lady and a dashing hero – the last played by Bob himself. They typically ended with the rescued damsel telling the hero to claim his reward: he always chose the ale. We filmed one behind King's Cross station and another in Bognor Regis; I was left with the equipment when the tide came in.

We »

- Keith Learner

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Bob Godfrey was a brilliant cartoonist, delightfully daft and a joy to work with

22 February 2013 11:20 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

I met Bob Godfrey in 1952 when I joined the William Larkin studio in Mayfair. To relieve the boredom of the industrial instructional films we were making, Bob and I started working on cartoon films in his basement in Tufnell Park, north London. In 1955 we left Larkin's and started Biographic Films, specifically to make commercials for ITV. We had the first cartoon commercial on the first night of ITV in September 1955.

For Courage Ales we made a series of live-action ads parodying silent cinema. The commercials, complete with title cards, followed the adventures of a villain, a lady and a dashing hero – the last played by Bob himself. They typically ended with the rescued damsel telling the hero to claim his reward: he always chose the ale. We filmed one behind King's Cross station and another in Bognor Regis; I was left with the equipment when the tide came in.

We »

- Keith Learner

Permalink | Report a problem


2013 | 2012 | 2010 | 2002

4 items from 2013


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