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Hear Rob Zombie Narrate Chilling New Charles Manson Doc 'The Final Words'

Hear Rob Zombie Narrate Chilling New Charles Manson Doc 'The Final Words'
Rob Zombie narrates a gripping trailer for a new documentary about Charles Manson, which includes audio interviews with the cult leader who orchestrated the 1969 Tate-labianca killings recorded in the year before his death. Charles Manson: The Final Words premieres December 3rd on Reelz.

The trailer teases snippets from several interviews with Manson, starting with a clip of him raving about his legacy. Elsewhere, Manson espouses his bizarre philosophies, claims his innocence once more and suggests that during the 40 years he's spent in prison, he's thought of not forgiveness and redemption
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Relative of First Manson 'Family' Victim Speaks Out After Cult Leader's Death: 'It Is About Time'

  • PEOPLE.com
Relative of First Manson 'Family' Victim Speaks Out After Cult Leader's Death: 'It Is About Time'
History usually remembers Gary Hinman as the first official “Manson family” victim — killed in July 1969 by a few of Charles Manson’s cult followers at his behest. But Hinman’s life was far more important to his relatives than his death.

“It is too bad he is known as a victim of Charles Manson, but that is not how the family remembers him,” cousin Charlotte Hood tells People after the news that Manson died Sunday, at age 83.

“I saw something on the Internet that he was very, very ill, and it is about time,” Hood says.

Speaking of Hinman, who was 34 when he was killed,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

People Explains: Behind the Manson Murders That Terrorized the Nation — and the Killers Now

People Explains: Behind the Manson Murders That Terrorized the Nation — and the Killers Now
In the summer of 1969, a group of young people led by Charles Manson sent a wave of terror through the hills of the Los Angeles area, leaving a trail of bodies behind them.

Nearly 50 years later, here’s what you need to know about the cult’s violence, its victims and where the killers are now.

The ‘Family’ Forms

Manson began attracting followers after he was released from prison in March 1967. But before he and his murderous group embarked on a plan to kill famous people, they sought out celebrities as friends, roommates and professional connections.

As Dianne Lake, the
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Manson Killer: It Was Never A 'Family' … That’s Fake News!

  • TMZ
Charles Manson murderer Bobby Beausoleil is jumping on the Trump bandwagon, calling Bs on the media calling Manson's group a "family." Beausoleil wrote a letter expressing his disdain for reporters who characterize the "semi-fictional entity" as "The Manson Family." He says it's all just "Manson mythology." The 69-year-old, who's locked up for life, does not specifically say why he takes issue with calling it a family, but it appears he's throwing shade on Charles Manson,
See full article at TMZ »

‘The Queen of Hollywood Blvd’ Mixes Debt and Revenge Against a Throwback La Backdrop

  • Indiewire
Here’s your daily dose of an indie film, web series, TV pilot, what-have-you in progress, as presented by the creators themselves. At the end of the week, you’ll have the chance to vote for your favorite.

In the meantime: Is this a project you’d want to see? Tell us in the comments.

The Queen of Hollywood Blvd

Logline: The proud owner of a Los Angeles strip club finds herself in hot water over a twenty-five year old debt to the mob, leading her on a downward spiral of violence and revenge through the underbelly of Los Angeles.

Elevator Pitch:

On her 60th birthday, Queen Mary (Rosemary Hochschild) receives a visit from Duke (Roger Guenveur Smith), a gangster who shows up out of the past to take back her beloved, aging Hollywood nightclub, given to her 25 years ago. But Duke is not a guy to be messed with,
See full article at Indiewire »

Kenneth Anger: 'No, I am not a Satanist'

Kenneth Anger's crazy, gorgeous, disturbing films almost landed him in jail. The avant-garde pioneer talks Simon Hattenstone through all his demons

The gallery is so tiny I think I've walked into somebody's front room. A 10-minute film plays on a loop. Weirded-out rock stars who look like Mick Jagger, or who are Mick Jagger, preen, strut and do their late-1960s satanic thing. White dots form a pyramid on a black background, naked boys lounge on a sofa, marines jump from a helicopter. There's a cat, a dog, an all-seeing Egyptian eye, people smoking dope out of a skull. A synthesiser makes an unbearable noise. There are no words, no story.

Around the screen, in London's Sprüth Magers gallery, a bunch of 21st-century trendies and stoners are watching this film, called Invocation of My Demon Brother, in awe, their ages ranging from late teens to late 80s. Next door,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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