IMDb > Lionel Bart > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDesk
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDesk
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005

1-20 of 27 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Doctor Who series 9: geeky spots in Sleep No More

14 November 2015 4:27 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

facebook

twitter

google+

Spoilers! We dig a little deeper into Mark Gatiss' Sleep No More, with our latest geeky spots and viewing notes...

When you’ve got a renowned Doctor Who fan like Mark Gatiss writing an episode, there’s bound to be a few nods to the shows past. Take them, throw in some cultural references and add a sprinkling of very tenuous similarities and you’ve got yourself this week’s geeky spots article. And if you’ve spotted things we’ve missed, or just have some tenuous theories of your own, please add them to the comments below!

Callback No More

This isn’t the Doctor’s first visit to a space station; the first on-screen trip came in 1968’s The Wheel In Space, when the second Doctor battled Cybermen aboard Space Station W3. Other memorable stations have included Nerva Beacon, from fourth Doctor tales The »

- simonbrew

Permalink | Report a problem


‘From Russia With Love’ remains sans pareil

1 November 2015 8:27 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

From Russia With Love

Directed by Terrence Young

Written by Richard Maibaum and Johanna Harwood

1963, UK

50 years later, and with twenty-three “official” entries, From Russia With Love represents the very best of the Bond franchise. Skyfall is the closest to be considered, at best – almost equal to what was achieved in ’64 – but From Russia With Love is still unparalleled. Although it is the second in the series, and although it feels like no Bond film that followed, it is the film that solidifies all the Bond elements into a formula – a template that carries on, even today.

Spectre’s Persian-stroking nemesis/mastermind Ernest Blofeld makes his first appearance and so does Desmond Llewelyn’s gadget-friendly Q (starting a run that continued until his death in 1999). Screenwriters Richard Maibaum and Johanna Harwood return, as does director and editor Terence Young and Peter Hunt. John Barry supplies the fine score by utilizing Monte Norman’s theme, »

- Ricky da Conceição

Permalink | Report a problem


Best James Bond Scenes: Sean Connery Era

1 November 2015 7:53 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

1: Dr No – Opening Title Sequence

The schizophrenic title sequence introduces John Barry’s famous James Bond theme, but instead of transitioning into the now traditional pop song (which uses the title as a lyric), random portions of two calypso songs were used instead. This was also of course the first of Maurice Binder’s many fantastic title sequences, and while some of the standard conventions are absent (such as the silhouetted nude bodies floating about), we still do get the lines of white dots sliding across the screen before transforming into a gun barrel, through which Bob Simmons fires his gun. From then it’s on to a procession of primary colours and shapes and an Atari-like animated sequence. All in all, this remains one of the most distinctive opening title sequences of the series.

(Watch the clip here)

2: Dr. NoCold Blooded Murder

There’s little doubt »

- Ricky da Conceição

Permalink | Report a problem


Stephen Lewis obituary

14 August 2015 10:18 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Actor whose career was dominated by the role of Blakey in On the Buses

Stephen Lewis, who has died aged 88, spent much of his long career playing variations of the character of Inspector Cyril “Blakey” Blake that he created so memorably in the long-running ITV 1970s comedy series On the Buses, his face contorted in a rictus of impotent rage as he muttered “I ’ate you, Butler” or “I’ll get you for this, Butler” at the slipshod and uncaring driver Stan Butler, played by Reg Varney. However, he first came to prominence as a playwright with Joan Littlewood’s leftwing Theatre Workshop, in the East End of London.

After the success of Frank Norman’s award-winning Fings Ain’t What They Used T’Be, with music by Lionel Bart, which transferred from the Theatre Royal, Stratford, to the West End in 1960, Littlewood was looking for another vibrant slice of working-class London life. »

- Stephen Dixon

Permalink | Report a problem


Toby Haynes To Direct New "Oliver" Musical

24 July 2015 7:50 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Frequent British TV director Toby Haynes ("Sherlock," "Doctor Who," "Being Human") is reportedly in talks to direct a new film adaptation of Lionel Bart's classic musical "Oliver!" for Working Title and Sony Pictures.

The project, which will be greenlit in a matter of weeks once rights deals are completed, aims to start shooting on location in and around London early next year for a late 2016 release. The tone is said to be grittier than the original.

Cameron Mackintosh will produce. Haynes, coming off the success of the acclaimed "Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell" mini-series adaptation which he both directed and executive produced, and his casting director Lucinda Syson have started to scout for the young British actors who'll play the title character.

Famed choreographer-director Matthew Bourne previously indicated he was linked to the project but that's not certain anymore.

Source: Variety »

- Garth Franklin

Permalink | Report a problem


Oliver! set for remake, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell director attached

24 July 2015 5:04 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Daily Mail is reporting that producer Cameron Mackintosh, along with Working Title and Sony Pictures, are set to produce a new version of Lionel Bart’s musical Oliver!

Toby Haynes, who directed British television drama Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, is set to helm the new film, which will start shooting next year in and around London locations. In addition, Haynes and casting director Lucinda Syson have reportedly already started the search to find the young British actors who will play the title character Oliver and The Artful Dodger.

The previous film version, which was released in 1968 and won five Academy Awards, was directed by Carol Reed, and starred Mark Lester, Jack Wild, Shani Wallis, Oliver Reed and Ron Moody.

»

- Scott J. Davis

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Jonathan Strange’ Director Toby Haynes Tapped For Lee Hall-Scripted ‘Oliver!’ Movie Musical

24 July 2015 3:41 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

While Sony Pictures and Working Title have been denying this for weeks, it looks like they have found a director for their grand reinvention of Oliver!, the musical with music and lyrics by Lionel Bart based on the Charles Dickens novel. It’s Toby Haynes, who just made a splash with the seven-part BBC One adaptation of Jonathan Strange & Mister Norrell, based on the Susanna Clarke novel. The studio and producer denied to me he had the offer or is negotiating, but it broke… »

Permalink | Report a problem


Please, sir, can I have it again? Oliver! musical to get remake

24 July 2015 3:39 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Lionel Bart’s celebrated Dickens adaptation to go before cameras again, with Jonathan Strange director Toby Haynes making his feature film debut

A new film version of the popular family musical Oliver! is set to go into production, with Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell director Toby Haynes in charge of the cameras, it has been reported.

According to the Daily Mail’s showbiz reporter Baz Bamigboye, theatre producer Cameron Mackintosh has teamed up with powerhouse UK film outfit Working Title to get a long-mulled over film production off the ground. (The same team partnered for the blockbusting 2012 adaptation of stage musical Les Miserables.) The original suggestion was that Billy Elliot director Stephen Daldry may have taken the director’s chair, but that is apparently not the case. Aside from Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, Haynes has also directed episodes of Sherlock, Doctor Who and Being Human. This would be his feature film debut. »

- Andrew Pulver

Permalink | Report a problem


Please, sir, can I have it again? Oliver! musical to get remake

24 July 2015 3:39 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Lionel Bart’s celebrated Dickens adaptation to go before cameras again, with Jonathan Strange director Toby Haynes making his feature film debut

A new film version of the popular family musical Oliver! is set to go into production, with Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell director Toby Haynes in charge of the cameras, it has been reported.

According to the Daily Mail’s showbiz reporter Baz Bamigboye, theatre producer Cameron Mackintosh has teamed up with powerhouse UK film outfit Working Title to get a long-mulled over film production off the ground. (The same team partnered for the blockbusting 2012 adaptation of stage musical Les Miserables.) The original suggestion was that Billy Elliot director Stephen Daldry may have taken the director’s chair, but that is apparently not the case. Aside from Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, Haynes has also directed episodes of Sherlock, Doctor Who and Being Human. This would be his feature film debut. »

- Andrew Pulver

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar-Winning Musical ‘Oliver!’ Getting New Movie Version

24 July 2015 2:44 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

London — Toby Haynes, who directed and exec produced TV drama “Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell,” is set to direct a new movie version of Lionel Bart’s musical “Oliver!,” which Cameron Mackintosh, Working Title and Sony Pictures are producing, according to the Daily Mail’s Baz Bamigboye.

“Oliver!” is set to be greenlit in a matter of weeks, once rights deals are completed, and the film will start shooting early next year, with a release penciled in for the end of next year. The film, which will be grittier than the original, will shoot on location in and around London.

Haynes and casting director Lucinda Syson have started to scout for the young British actors who’ll play the title character, the Artful Dodger and the other kids in the musical. Working Title has experience in seeking out young talent as it produced the film and stage versions of “Billy Elliot. »

- Leo Barraclough

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar-Nominated Actor Biggest Professional Regret: Turning Down 'Doctor Who'

19 June 2015 4:25 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ron Moody in Mel Brooks' 'The Twelve Chairs.' The 'Doctor Who' that never was. Ron Moody: 'Doctor Who' was biggest professional regret (See previous post: "Ron Moody: From Charles Dickens to Walt Disney – But No Harry Potter.") Ron Moody was featured in about 50 television productions, both in the U.K. and the U.S., from the late 1950s to 2012. These included guest roles in the series The Avengers, Gunsmoke, Starsky and Hutch, Hart to Hart, and Murder She Wrote, in addition to leads in the short-lived U.S. sitcom Nobody's Perfect (1980), starring Moody as a Scotland Yard detective transferred to the San Francisco Police Department, and in the British fantasy Into the Labyrinth (1981), with Moody as the noble sorcerer Rothgo. Throughout the decades, he could also be spotted in several TV movies, among them:[1] David Copperfield (1969). As Uriah Heep in this disappointing all-star showcase distributed theatrically in some countries. »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar Nominated Moody Pt.2: From Fagin to Merlin - But No Harry Potter

19 June 2015 4:00 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ron Moody as Fagin in 'Oliver!' based on Charles Dickens' 'Oliver Twist.' Ron Moody as Fagin in Dickens musical 'Oliver!': Box office and critical hit (See previous post: "Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' Actor, Academy Award Nominee Dead at 91.") Although British made, Oliver! turned out to be an elephantine release along the lines of – exclamation point or no – Gypsy, Star!, Hello Dolly!, and other Hollywood mega-musicals from the mid'-50s to the early '70s.[1] But however bloated and conventional the final result, and a cast whose best-known name was that of director Carol Reed's nephew, Oliver Reed, Oliver! found countless fans.[2] The mostly British production became a huge financial and critical success in the U.S. at a time when star-studded mega-musicals had become perilous – at times downright disastrous – ventures.[3] Upon the American release of Oliver! in Dec. 1968, frequently acerbic The »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


After Christopher Lee, Another Nonagenarian British Actor Has Died: Oscar Nominee Moody

12 June 2015 4:05 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ron Moody in 'Oliver!' movie. Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' actor nominated for an Oscar dead at 91 (Note: This Ron Moody article is currently being revised.) Two well-regarded, nonagenarian British performers have died in the last few days: 93-year-old Christopher Lee (June 7, '15), best known for his many portrayals of Dracula and assorted movie villains and weirdos, from the title role in The Mummy to Dr. Catheter in Gremlins 2: The New Batch. 91-year-old Ron Moody (yesterday, June 11), among whose infrequent film appearances was the role of Fagin, the grotesque adult leader of a gang of boy petty thieves, in the 1968 Best Picture Academy Award-winning musical Oliver!, which also earned him a Best Actor nomination. Having been featured in nearly 200 movies and, most importantly, having had his mainstream appeal resurrected by way of the villainous Saruman in Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit movies (and various associated merchandising, »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Rip Ron Moody, Famed Fagin of 'Oliver!'

12 June 2015 7:58 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Sometimes an actor stumbles into a role that defines a career. Ron Moody, who died Thursday at the age of 91, sang his way in. A journeyman British movie and television actor and musical revue performer, he was 36 in 1960 when he accepted the role of Fagin, master of a gang of child pickpockets, in Lionel Bart’s musical stage version of Charles Dickens’ "Oliver Twist" after two other actors had turned the part down. (Watch Moody perform "You've Got to Pick a Pocket or Two" in the video below.) "Fate destined me to play Fagin; it was the part of a lifetime," Moody once said. He played Fagin again in "Oliver!" Carol Reed’s Oscar-winning 1968 film. That time Fagin won Moody a Golden Globe and an Oscar nomination for Best Actor. Moody had turned down an offer to go to Broadway with "Oliver!" after the musical’s London run because he felt it would trap him. »

- Aljean Harmetz

Permalink | Report a problem


Ron Moody, Star Of "Oliver!", Dead At Age 91

11 June 2015 7:28 PM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Moody as Fagin with Mark Lester as Oliver Twist and Jack Wild as The Artful Dodger.

By Lee Pfeiffer

There is an old adage that says bad things happen in "threes". That seemed to be the case when it came to distinguished British actors in the past week.  On the heels of news that both Richard Johnson and Sir Christopher Lee had passed away comes notice that Ron Moody has also died. He was 91 years old. Moody was undoubtedly the least famous of these three gentlemen but he was no less talented. He originated the role of Fagin in Lionel Bart's classic stage musical, "Oliver!", based on the Dickens classic "Oliver Twist". Moody won kudos for his role as the charismatic con man and head of a London gang that employed young boys as pickpockets. He was astonished when he was chosen to play the lead in the 1968 film version, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

Permalink | Report a problem


Ron Moody obituary

11 June 2015 1:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Actor best known for playing Fagin in Lionel Bart’s film and stage musical Oliver!

Ron Moody, who has died aged 91, saw himself not as a great comic actor – above all as Fagin in Lionel Bart’s Oliver! on stage and screen – but as a writer and as a composer of musicals. Most of the world could never quite be persuaded to agree. He wrote more than a dozen (mostly unperformed) musicals and a clutch of (mostly published) novels, and could be an explosively funny after-dinner speaker for theatre charities. To everything he did, he brought a questioning anarchic flair.

When the possibility of creating the role of Dickens’s miserly mentor of child pickpockets arose, he was wary: “At first I never wanted to do it. They told me there was this musical of Oliver Twist so I went to see the Alec Guinness film [Oliver Twist, 1948], which I found to »

- Dennis Barker

Permalink | Report a problem


Ron Moody, the original 'Oliver!' Fagin, dies at 91

11 June 2015 9:28 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Oscar nominated actor Ron Moody, best known for a career of playing Fagin in the musical "Oliver!," died on Thursday, June 11 at the age of 91. Moody was the original Fagin in Lionel Bart's West End production of "Oliver!," which premiered in 1960. He was able to play the pick-pocketing grifter in Carol Reed's 1968 film adaptation, which won the Best Picture Oscar, earned Moody his lone Oscar nomination and also earned him a Golden Globe win for Best Motion Picture Actor - Musical/Comedy. Over the years, Moody returned to various productions of "Oliver!" to great acclaim, even picking up a Tony nomination for a 1984 Broadway revival. Moody famously turned down the opportunity to replace Patrick Troughton as the third Doctor, but he did appear in a "Doctor Who" audio play in 2005.  His other credits include "EastEnders" and performances as Merlin in both "Unidentified Flying Oddball" and "A Kid in King Arthur's Court. »

- Daniel Fienberg

Permalink | Report a problem


Ron Moody Dies: ‘Oliver!’s Fagin Was 91

11 June 2015 3:47 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

A Golden Globe winner and Oscar nominee for Carol Reed’s 1968 film musical, Oliver!, Ron Moody has died. He was 91. Moody, who was born in Tottenham in 1924, originated the iconic role of Fagin in Lionel Bart’s West End stage version of Charles DickensOliver Twist in 1960. He went on to portray the petty criminal who leads a gang of pickpocketing children in the 1968 Best Picture Oscar winning feature for which he was nominated as Best Actor. He won the Golden Globe… »

Permalink | Report a problem


Ron Moody Dies: ‘Oliver!’s Fagin Was 91

11 June 2015 3:47 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

A Golden Globe winner and Oscar nominee for Carol Reed’s 1968 film musical, Oliver!, Ron Moody has died. He was 91. Moody, who was born in Tottenham in 1924, originated the iconic role of Fagin in Lionel Bart’s West End stage version of Charles DickensOliver Twist in 1960. He went on to portray the petty criminal who leads a gang of pickpocketing children in the 1968 Best Picture Oscar winning feature for which he was nominated as Best Actor. He won the Golden Globe… »

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Oliver!’ Star Ron Moody Dies at 91

11 June 2015 3:35 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

London — The actor Ron Moody, who played Fagin in the movie “Oliver!,” has died at the age of 91.

“He brought joy to his family and to the hearts of many and will be greatly missed. He was singing until the end,” Moody’s widow Therese Blackbourn Moody told the BBC.

Moody is best known for the role of the criminal Fagin in the Charles Dickens adaptation “Oliver!,” a role that earned him Oscar and BAFTA nominations, as well as a Golden Globe win in 1969. The film received 11 Oscar nomination and took home six statuettes, including for film and director for Carol Reed.

Moody first appeared as Fagin in Lionel Bart’s West End stage adaptation in 1960, and won a Tony when he returned to the role for a Broadway revival in 1984.

“Fate destined me to play Fagin. It was the part of a lifetime,” he said.

The depiction of Fagin in the source novel, »

- Leo Barraclough

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005

1-20 of 27 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners