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13 items from 2010


Rue McClanahan and Betty White Work Blue

5 June 2010 11:30 AM, PDT | Movieline | See recent Movieline news »

Have you ever wanted to see Rue McClanahan and Betty White trade dirty jokes while on the set of Golden Girls? Well, here's your chance! In the wake of McClanahan's passing earlier this week, TMZ has unearthed a "never-before-seen video" -- with a non-working embed code, harumph -- of the two ladies killing time between takes in the mid-'80s the only way they could: By swapping bestiality jokes. And, in McClanahan's case, bestiality jokes told by Conrad Bain. Because, of course Conrad Bain would walk around telling a joke that concludes with "Will you hold that dog for me?" [TMZ] »

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Gary Coleman obituary

30 May 2010 9:41 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Diff'rent Strokes star whose success lasted only as long as the run of the Us sitcom

There are doubtless many child actors who make happy transitions to adulthood. However, only those that make tragic ones hit the headlines: perhaps early success without any sacrifice can breed a sense of entitlement and a lack of responsibility.

The diminutive Us performer Gary Coleman, who has died of a brain haemorrhage aged 42, was unanimously considered the cutest and sassiest of child stars on television. From the age of 10, he appeared in the sitcom Diff'rent Strokes (1978-86), eventually earning as much as $100,000 per episode. However, it was after the show ended that things began to go wrong for Coleman, illustrating F Scott Fitzgerald's dictum that: "There are no second acts in American lives."

In the award-winning stage musical Avenue Q (2003), a character called Gary Coleman – "a washed-up former child star", now an apartment »

- Ronald Bergan

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Gary Coleman obituary

30 May 2010 9:41 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Diff'rent Strokes star whose success lasted only as long as the run of the Us sitcom

There are doubtless many child actors who make happy transitions to adulthood. However, only those that make tragic ones hit the headlines: perhaps early success without any sacrifice can breed a sense of entitlement and a lack of responsibility.

The diminutive Us performer Gary Coleman, who has died of a brain haemorrhage aged 42, was unanimously considered the cutest and sassiest of child stars on television. From the age of 10, he appeared in the sitcom Diff'rent Strokes (1978-86), eventually earning as much as $100,000 per episode. However, it was after the show ended that things began to go wrong for Coleman, illustrating F Scott Fitzgerald's dictum that: "There are no second acts in American lives."

In the award-winning stage musical Avenue Q (2003), a character called Gary Coleman – "a washed-up former child star", now an apartment »

- Ronald Bergan

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Gary Coleman, Dead at 42, Led a Life of ‘Diff’rent Strokes’

29 May 2010 3:26 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Television fans from the early 1980s lost a bit of their era yesterday as Gary Coleman, Arnold Jackson from the NBC sitcom “Diff’rent Strokes,” died of a brain hemorrhage at the age of 42. Coleman is the second of the three siblings on the show to pass away, as Dana Plato, who played his sister Kimberley, took her own life in 1999.

Gary Coleman was born in the Chicago suburb of Zion, Il, and had a host of kidney problems that led to his diminutive size. He achieved his first notoriety near his hometown, when his commercial for the Chicago-based Harris Bank – featuring Coleman interacting with the bank’s stuffed lion – became a local sensation. This brought him to the attention of Hollywood, where he won the role of Arnold Jackson on Diff’rent Strokes in 1978.

In a time when TV stars became national treasures, Coleman took the show and the catch phrase, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Diff'rent Strokes: Gary Coleman Dies at 42; Goodnight Arnold Jackson

29 May 2010 1:21 PM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

"Whatchu talkin' 'bout, Willis?" is a phrase that has become part of our culture. Gary Coleman, the adorable child star who made those words famous, was besieged with health and personal problems throughout his life. He passed away on Friday at the age of 42, after being admitted to the hospital with a brain hemorrhage.

Coleman is best known for his role as Arnold Jackson on Diff'rent Strokes. The TV show follows a rich widower, Philip Drummond (Conrad Bain), who lives in a Manhattan penthouse with his teenage daughter (Dana Plato) and housekeeper, Mrs. Garrett (Charlotte Rae). Following the death of Drummond's previous housekeeper, her children -- Arnold and his older brother, Willis (Todd Bridges) -- move uptown to join the Drummond family.

In real life, Coleman was also adopted. He was also born with congenital kidney disease, which led to two separate kidney »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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Gary Coleman Dead At 42

28 May 2010 6:41 PM, PDT | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Former child star Gary Coleman has died at the age of 42 after suffering a serious brain haemorrhage earlier this week (ends28May10).

The Diff'rent Strokes star, who suffered from a congenital kidney disease, was admitted to Utah Valley Regional Medical Center on Wednesday following a fall at his home.

He was fully conscious after the accident but his condition gradually worsened. On Thursday his manager, John Alcantar, revealed he was "unconscious and on life support".

Coleman's wife Shannon decided to take him off life support early on Friday and he died at around 12.05pm (local time) from an intracranial haemorrhage.

A statement released by his rep reads: "Thanks to everyone for their well wishing and support during this tragic time. Now that Gary has passed, we know he will be missed because of all the love and support shown in the past couple of days.

"Gary is now at peace and his memory will be kept in the hearts of those who were entertained by him throughout the years."

Coleman, the adopted son of nurse Edmonia Sue and her partner W.G. Coleman, began his TV career in the early 1970s with small parts in The Jeffersons and Good Times before landing his breakthrough role as Arnold Jackson in Diff'rent Strokes in 1978.

He starred for eight years alongside his TV brother Todd Bridges, who played Willis Jackson, as two African-American boys adopted by wealthy Caucasian widower Phillip Drummond (Conrad Bain).

Coleman fast became the show's most popular star, known for his character's catchphrase, "What'choo talkin' 'bout Willis?" and eventually earned $100,000 (£66,670) per episode.

He went on to score his own animated series, The Gary Coleman Show, and voiced his character for a year before it was axed in 1983.

He later won guest roles in a variety of small screen projects, including a cameo as Jackson in a 1996 episode of Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, as well as appearances in TV sitcoms My Wife and Kids and Married... with Children, and a voiceover part in The Simpsons.

Coleman also starred in a number of made-for-tv movies including The Kid with the Broken Halo (1982), Playing with Fire (1985), Fox Hunt (1996) and 2003's A Christmas Carol.

His last film role was in 2009's Midgets vs. Mascots.

Despite his many TV and film appearances, Coleman struggled financially and he successfully sued his parents and former manager in 1989 for misappropriating his $3.8 million (£2.53 million) trust fund. In 1993, he was awarded $1.28 million (£853,340).

However, he filed for bankruptcy in 1999, citing the early mismanagement of his trust for his money problems.

Coleman was no stranger to the law and was arrested on a few occasions for assault and disorderly conduct.

His most recent arrest occurred in January when he was suspected of domestic violence following an alleged altercation with his wife Shannon Price, who he wed in 2007. He was handed a fine in February and ordered to attend domestic violence classes in exchange for avoiding jail.

The actor's career was also overshadowed by his many health problems, after undergoing two kidney transplants in 1973 and 1984, which required frequent dialysis. He had heart surgery last year and spent the past few months in and out of hospital suffering from seizures, which saw him collapse during a round of telephone interviews in January.

Coleman was hospitalised again in February after another apparent seizure while on the set of U.S. TV news programme The Insider.

He is survived by his wife Price, who he reunited with in April after a few months' estrangement. The couple had no kids. »

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Gary Coleman dead at 42

28 May 2010 5:35 PM, PDT | Corona's Coming Attractions | See recent Corona's Coming Attractions news »

Former child star of Diff'rent Strokes Gary Coleman passed away earlier today in a Utah Valley hospital. On Wednesday he suffered a brain hemorrhage after taking a fall and had been admitted to hospital. Yesterday Coleman slipped into unconsciousness and never came out of it. Doctors kept his body alive but made the hard decision today to remove life support and let nature take its course. He passed away at 12:05 Pm.

Coleman had been sent to hospital three times this year, once for a seizure. Throughout his life Coleman's medical health had always been a concern: before his first birthday he had been diagnosed with kidney failure, a condition which led to his diminuative size. He had two kidney transplants before his 14th birthday and had to undergo dialysis as much as four times a day.

But it was the child-like physical traits that also brought him to the attention of talent scouts. »

- Patrick Sauriol

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Gary Coleman's 'Diff'rent Strokes' Co-Stars React

28 May 2010 3:15 PM, PDT | TheInsider.com | See recent The Insider news »

Todd Bridges, who played the late Gary Coleman's brother Willis on "Diff'rent Strokes," is opening up about Coleman's death, along with the show's Mrs. Garrett, Charlotte Rae. "I was with [Gary] the first year of 'Diff'rent Strokes' and he was the reason we were such a big hit," says Rae. "He was the centerpiece and we all surrounded him. He was absolutely enchanting, adorable, funny and filled with joy, which he spread around to millions of people all over the world." "It's unfortunate. It's a sad day," Bridges tells the Associated Press. "It's sad that I'm the last kid alive from the show." Dana Plato, who co-starred on the sitcom as Bridges' and Coleman's teenage sister Kimberly, committed suicide in 1999. Earlier today, before the sad news hit that Coleman died, Conrad Bain, who played dad Philip Drummond on the show, said, "I'm hoping and praying that he comes around in a successful way. »

- TheInsider

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Gary Coleman: 'Whatcha talkin' 'bout, Willis?' and other memorable TV moments

28 May 2010 1:12 PM, PDT | Zap2It - From Inside the Box | See recent Zap2It - From Inside the Box news »

Gary Coleman spent most of his adult life trying to live down his cute child star persona from "Diff'rent Strokes," but that and other childhood roles are the ones that we most fondly remember from his career.

Before the Cashcall.com commercials, before his laughable run for governor of California, before appearing on "Divorce Court" there was Arnold Jackson (later Jackson-Drummond), who had nothing but the genes. He and Todd Bridges played two orphaned brothers from Harlem who are taken in by the wealthy Mr. Drummond (Conrad Bain) who eventually adopts them.

As Arnold, the diminutive, chubby-cheeked Coleman made the round of other sitcoms of the day, including "Silver Spoons" and the "Facts of Life." His character launched one of the top pop culture catchphrases from television: "Whatchu talkin' 'bout, Willis?"

Here's a selection of some of Zap2it's favorite Gary Coleman child star roles.

"Whatchu talkin' 'bout, Willis?" montage: »

- editorial@zap2it.com

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Coleman's Diff'rent Strokes Dad 'Praying' For Star

28 May 2010 12:06 PM, PDT | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Gary Coleman's TV dad Conrad Bain is "praying" for the former child star as he fights for his life in hospital after suffering a brain haemorrhage.

The diminutive Diff'rent Strokes star was admitted to Utah Valley Regional Medical Center on Wednesday following a fall at his home. He was fully conscious after the accident but his condition gradually worsened and he went into a coma on Thursday.

On Friday, Coleman's manager, John Alcantar, revealed the actor was "unconscious and on life support", and asked fans for their "thoughts and prayers".

And Bain, who played Philip Drummond on the hit 1970s show, is keeping Coleman in his thoughts.

He tells TMZ.com, "(I'm) hoping and praying for his recovery." »

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Gary Coleman On Life Support

28 May 2010 8:41 AM, PDT | TheInsider.com | See recent The Insider news »

Former child star Gary Coleman is on life support at a Utah hospital, after losing consciousness mid-afternoon on Thursday. A hospital representative tells "The Insider" that Coleman suffered an intracranial hemorrhage on Wednesday night. After being immediately taken to a local hospital for treatment, he was transferred to another hospital for tests and treatment. By mid-morning on Thursday, Coleman was conscious and lucid, but by early afternoon, he began slipping in and out of consciousness and his condition worsened. Coleman has not been in any condition to undergo surgery, the hospital rep says. The hospital rep adds, "We are saddened to announce that since mid afternoon, Mountain Time, on May 27, 2010, Mr. Coleman has been unconscious and on life support." The rep goes on to say, "In recent years Gary Coleman has had difficulties, not only with health issues, but also with his personal and public life. At times, it may not have been apparent, »

- TheInsider

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'Diff'rent Strokes' Dad -- I'm 'Praying' for Gary

28 May 2010 8:30 AM, PDT | TMZ | See recent TMZ news »

The man who played Gary Coleman 's sitcom father on " Diff'rent Strokes " tells TMZ he's aware of Gary's tragic situation -- and says he's "hoping and praying for his recovery." Conrad Bain , 87, -- who played Philip Drummond on the show -- tells us the two haven't spoken in years ... but with the recent reports, Gary is definitely in his thoughts. As we previously reported, Coleman is currently on life support after suffering a intracranial hemorrhage earlier this week. »

- TMZ Staff

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Conan O’Brien Comedy Tour: Review Revue

13 April 2010 2:00 PM, PDT | Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal | See recent Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal news »

Getty

Conan O’Brien’s bearded, wandering-in-the-wilderness period has officially come to an end. O’Brien announced yesterday that he’ll be hosting a late night talk show on TBS, starting in November. And last night he kicked off his “Legally Prohibited From Being Funny On TV” comedy tour in front of an adoring crowd in Eugene, Ore. Did the “Tonight Show” debacle damage Conan’s funny? Here’s what reviewers are saying.

“Though his trademark self-deprecation permeated his performance, like when he joked about having “no ass” while donning the ridiculous purple suit Eddie Murphy wore in his stand-up film Raw, O’Brien exuded defiant confidence throughout the night, bolstered by a crowd that roared with approval of nearly everything he did. He also used the format to show off his musical chops, strapping on a guitar for his personalized version of “On the Road Again” and an unfinished »

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2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

13 items from 2010


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