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Tina Fey's Disney Witch Movie Is Not a Sequel to 'Hocus Pocus'

Tina Fey's Disney Witch Movie Is Not a Sequel to 'Hocus Pocus'
Just as quickly as the long-rumored Hocus Pocus 2 started showing signs of life, with a report earlier today that Tina Fey is on board to produce, Variety reveals that the story is not true. Here's what the actress/producer's rep had to say, in debunking the rumor.

"Their report is not accurate - Tina is not developing a sequel to Hocus Pocus."

However, while Deadline's own report confirms that the actress is not involved with Hocus Pocus 2, they reveal that she is actually developing something new, a movie known only as the Untitled Witch Project for Disney. She is attached to both produce and star in this non-sequel.

The Untitled Witch Project is described as being in the same vein as Ghostbusters, with Allison Shearmur co-producing. Disney is not currently developing Hocus Pocus 2 at this time.

The original story from earlier today claimed that Hocus Pocus 2 was to center on a housewife,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Tina Fey to Produce, Possibly Star in 'Hocus Pocus 2' with Melissa McCarthy

Tina Fey to Produce, Possibly Star in 'Hocus Pocus 2' with Melissa McCarthy
More than 20 years after it debuted in theaters, Walt Disney Pictures is developing a sequel to the 1993 magical comedy Hocus Pocus, which now has Tina Fey on board to produce.

There has been talk of Hocus Pocus 2 for several years, with Disney denying rumors of a follow-up entitled Hocus Pocus 2: Rise of the Elderwitch back in 2012. In April, The Tracking Board reported that the production is seeking two lead female actresses, "in the same vein as Tina Fey and Melissa McCarthy." It isn't known yet if Tina Fey will take on one of these leading roles, but she is producing alongside Allison Shearmur, Bryan Oh and Stephen Meinen, along with Disney executives Jessica Virtue and Tendo Nagenda.

The original Hocus Pocus starred Bette Midler, Sarah Jessica Parker and Kathy Najimy as the Sanderson Sisters, three immortal witches who are resurrected in Salem, Massachusetts on Halloween night. It's up to
See full article at MovieWeb »

Complete Buffy reviews: The Wish

[This episode review contains foreshadowing for future episodes, and the following review comments on this, though sometimes indirectly. Depending on your tolerance for spoilers, you may or may not wish to continue reading if you haven't finished watching the show.]

A big pot of gold delivered to your door. World peace. No more EastEnders on TV. Wishing may well be the most common pastime on Planet Earth, just inching ahead of backgammon and darts.

But as the old saying goes: “Be careful of what you wish for”. Cordelia's taking this advice on board a bit too late after new kid in town Anya (in reality, a scary, veiny demon) grants her wish of Buffy never coming to Sunnydale. This can only mean one thing: Alternate Dimension Time.

The Alternate Dimension is a common trope in fiction, in films such as It's A Wonderful Life. It's especially popular in science fiction. Doctor Who came up with Inferno, in which Jon Pertwee's Doctor found himself on a parallel Earth, just hours away from doomsday. Worse still, he had to battle with vicious, unkind counterparts of his friends, including Liz and the
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Retro Review: Invasion Earth – The Aliens Are Here

Invasion Earth: The Aliens Are Here

Stars: Janice Fabian, Christian Lee, Larry Bagby, Dana Young | Written by Miller Drake | Directed by Robert Skotak

Aliens invade a small town invading the towns cinema where the patrons are watching a sci-fi marathon. Taking over the projection room, the aliens splice together footage of old sci-fi films from the 50s to try an “bore” the audience into losing their minds so that they can take them over. A couple of teenagers in the audience realise that the alien threat is real and set out to put an end to the aliens plans before it’s too late.

Only really notable for being the one and only directorial effort from Robert Skotak, a visual effects whiz who has worked on such films as Tremors, Darkman, Terminator 2 and more recently Joe Dante’s The Hole, Invasion Earth: The Aliens Are Here isn’t really a movie,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Review: Age of the Dragons

Age Of The Dragons *

Stars: Danny Glover, Vinnie Jones, Corey Sevier, Kepa Kruse, Sofia Pernas | Written by Anne. K Black, McKay Daines | Directed by Ryan Little

Age Of The Dragons had the potential to be gloriously trashy. A reimagining of Moby Dick but with dragons instead of the titular white whale, and starring Danny Glover, this has got “Cult Classic” written all over it. Unfortunately, it’s just as bad as it sounds but not bad enough to be ironically enjoyable.

The story will be familiar to anyone that’s read or seen the source material. Whaler (or in this case Dragon Hunter) Ishmael (Corey Sevier) and his companion Queequeg (Kepa Kruse) board the ship Peaquod (this time a mobile fort on wheels) run by the enigmatic Captain Ahab (Danny Glover), a figure shrouded in legend after a white dragon killed his sister and left him disfigured. His crew is
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Kanin Howell interview, 'Young and the Restless' Frank left an impression

CBS' "The Young and the Restless" featured actor Kanin Howell the week of May 17 as Frank the Con Man, a character who throws a major monkey wrench into the soap's finely oiled engine. Kanin appeared in a full Yatr episode arc as Frank, a smooth-talking conman always on the lookout to find another victim. Questions remain if Frank the Con met up with Frank the forger (Larry Bagby),Adam (Michael Muhney) and Victor (Eric Braeden) in prison. Howell comes from Hollywood crafts royalty; his dad is a three time Emmy-nominated stunt coordinator. At an early age Howell was exposed to the magic of movie-making getting his start in the industry working as a stuntman, like
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

In Pictures: 'Larry Bagby in Concert'

Larry Bagby live at The Mint in Los Angeles. Photo copyright by Albert L. Ortega / PR Photos. Larry Bagby live at The Mint in Los Angeles. Photo copyright by Albert L. Ortega / PR Photos. Larry Bagby live at The Mint in Los Angeles. Photo copyright by Albert L. Ortega / PR Photos. Larry Bagby live at The Mint in Los Angeles. Photo copyright by Albert L. Ortega / PR Photos. 10/07/2009 - Larry Bagby - Actor/Musician Larry Bagby Live - The Mint - Los Angeles, CA. USA © Albert L. Ortega / PR Photos 10/07/2009 - Larry Bagby - Actor/Musician Larry Bagby Live - The Mint - Los Angeles, CA. USA ©
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

Walk the Line

Walk the Line
TORONTO -- Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon give strong acting and singing performances in the Johnny Cash biopic "Walk the Line". Playing the legendary Man in Black, Phoenix displays a surprisingly good voice and the ability to imitate Johnny's deep bass. As his second wife, singer June Carter, Witherspoon delivers a knockout performance as a woman who must temper her passion with an unwillingness to witness her man's self-destruction.

James Mangold's movie, too, has its rewards as it manages to skirt many of the usual dangers of any truthful look at a legend, especially a musical one. Like last year's "Ray", the chosen path is a conventional one, but it does yield an emotionally satisfying story of a man who battled many devils to claim a life of artistic and personal achievement.

Given the late singer's huge influence on music -- on folk, rock, country and punk -- and the smoothness of this particular production, it's hard to see why there won't be long lines at boxoffices for "Walk the Line".

Phoenix has never been the most expressive of actors, but that works just fine for Johnny Cash. A shy man who cultivated an outlaw image and sang of hard-luck lives in hard-living songs, he took the stage with a stony face and a guitar aimed at the audience. Phoenix doesn't look much like Johnny, but he gets his stage persona.

Witherspoon gets the humor and honesty as well as the resonant voice of the scrappy performing daughter of country music's first family. June falls for Johnny, but Johnny's first wife, Vivian (Ginnifer Goodwin), June's own second marriage and Johnny's increasing dependence on drugs and booze kept her at arm's length for many years.

Gill Dennis and Mangold base their screenplay on two books by Cash, "Man in Black" and "Cash: The Autobiography", as well as interviews with the couple up until their deaths in 2003. The movie follows Johnny's life from the cotton fields of Arkansas in the 1940s to his celebrated performance at Folsom Prison in 1968, which produced a best-selling live album. That span includes his pill-popping and groupie-cuddling days but stops before his born-again conversion in the 1970s.

A sawmill accident claims the life of Johnny's older brother, Jack, whom everyone saw as the "good" brother, the one headed for a life of preaching. Johnny's mean-spirited father (Robert Patrick) even declared that the devil "took the wrong son," thus insuring a lifetime of guilt and pain for Johnny.

The movie rushes through his Army service, first marriage and failed jobs to get to the fateful moment when Johnny walks through the door of Sun Studios in Memphis in 1955 and presents himself to producer Sam Phillips (Dallas Roberts). The audition with his band -- guitarist Luther Perkins Dan John Miller) and bassist Marshall Grant (Larry Bagby) -- goes badly until Phillips suggests Johnny do a song from the heart. One of his old tunes from his Army days does the trick, and soon he's touring with Elvis, Jerry Lee Lewis and the sassy June Carter.

The movie concentrates on the blossoming relationship -- it was hardly a romance, at least not at first -- between Johnny and June. The movie establishes a strong and enduring friendship between these two, although Johnny's lingering looks are a clear sign he hopes for more.

Following June's divorce, Johnny makes romantic overtures but, according to the movie, June manages to resist for nearly a decade. Johnny does persuade June to work and tour with him, though, which leaves wife Vivian to draw her own conclusions.

"Walk the Line" -- a title drawn from Johnny's song about the difficulties of avoiding temptation while married -- is essentially a romance about a couple who are alone together only onstage. The two clearly are soul mates, but much stands between them including Johnny's equally passionate attraction to amphetamines. When June has had enough, Johnny's life spirals downward with an arrest, separation from his family and financial and health problems.

The decision to approach Johnny's life as a love story causes Mangold to neglect the development of Johnny's music. In fact, the movie implies that Johnny falls into his musical style and personality without giving it much thought. Despite the accomplished vocal work by Phoenix and Witherspoon, the film doesn't give us nearly enough of these two people as musicians.

The production is solid other than the fact that no one ages a bit. Photographed by Phedon Papamichael and edited by Michael McCusker, the concert footage is fine and energetic, while the leaps in time never feel jarring. All period details are accomplished without fuss. T-Bone Burnett expertly handles not only the score but also production of all the film's music.

WALK THE LINE

20th Century Fox

Fox 2000 Pictures presents a Tree Line Films/Catfish Prods. production

Credits:

Director: James Mangold

Screenwriters: Gill Dennis, James Mangold

Based on the books "Man in Black" and "Cash: The Autobiography" by: Johnny Cash

Producer: Cathy Konrad, James Keach

Executive producers: John Carter Cash, Alan C. Blomquist

Director of photography: Phedon Papamichael

Production designer: David J. Bomba

Costumes: Arianne Phillips

Music: T-Bone Burnett

Editor: Michael McCusker

Cast:

Johnny Cash: Joaquin Phoenix

June Carter: Reese Witherspoon

Vivian Cash: Ginnifer Goodwin

Ray Cash: Robert Patrick

Sam Phillips: Dallas Roberts

Carrie Cash: Shelby Lynne

Luther Perkins: Dan John Miller

Marshall Grant: Larry Bagby

Running time -- 136 minutes

MPAA rating: PG-13

Walk the Line

Walk the Line
TORONTO -- Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon give strong acting and singing performances in the Johnny Cash biopic "Walk the Line". Playing the legendary Man in Black, Phoenix displays a surprisingly good voice and the ability to imitate Johnny's deep bass. As his second wife, singer June Carter, Witherspoon delivers a knockout performance as a woman who must temper her passion with an unwillingness to witness her man's self-destruction.

James Mangold's movie, too, has its rewards as it manages to skirt many of the usual dangers of any truthful look at a legend, especially a musical one. Like last year's "Ray", the chosen path is a conventional one, but it does yield an emotionally satisfying story of a man who battled many devils to claim a life of artistic and personal achievement.

Given the late singer's huge influence on music -- on folk, rock, country and punk -- and the smoothness of this particular production, it's hard to see why there won't be long lines at boxoffices for "Walk the Line".

Phoenix has never been the most expressive of actors, but that works just fine for Johnny Cash. A shy man who cultivated an outlaw image and sang of hard-luck lives in hard-living songs, he took the stage with a stony face and a guitar aimed at the audience. Phoenix doesn't look much like Johnny, but he gets his stage persona.

Witherspoon gets the humor and honesty as well as the resonant voice of the scrappy performing daughter of country music's first family. June falls for Johnny, but Johnny's first wife, Vivian (Ginnifer Goodwin), June's own second marriage and Johnny's increasing dependence on drugs and booze kept her at arm's length for many years.

Gill Dennis and Mangold base their screenplay on two books by Cash, "Man in Black" and "Cash: The Autobiography", as well as interviews with the couple up until their deaths in 2003. The movie follows Johnny's life from the cotton fields of Arkansas in the 1940s to his celebrated performance at Folsom Prison in 1968, which produced a best-selling live album. That span includes his pill-popping and groupie-cuddling days but stops before his born-again conversion in the 1970s.

A sawmill accident claims the life of Johnny's older brother, Jack, whom everyone saw as the "good" brother, the one headed for a life of preaching. Johnny's mean-spirited father (Robert Patrick) even declared that the devil "took the wrong son," thus insuring a lifetime of guilt and pain for Johnny.

The movie rushes through his Army service, first marriage and failed jobs to get to the fateful moment when Johnny walks through the door of Sun Studios in Memphis in 1955 and presents himself to producer Sam Phillips (Dallas Roberts). The audition with his band -- guitarist Luther Perkins Dan John Miller) and bassist Marshall Grant (Larry Bagby) -- goes badly until Phillips suggests Johnny do a song from the heart. One of his old tunes from his Army days does the trick, and soon he's touring with Elvis, Jerry Lee Lewis and the sassy June Carter.

The movie concentrates on the blossoming relationship -- it was hardly a romance, at least not at first -- between Johnny and June. The movie establishes a strong and enduring friendship between these two, although Johnny's lingering looks are a clear sign he hopes for more.

Following June's divorce, Johnny makes romantic overtures but, according to the movie, June manages to resist for nearly a decade. Johnny does persuade June to work and tour with him, though, which leaves wife Vivian to draw her own conclusions.

"Walk the Line" -- a title drawn from Johnny's song about the difficulties of avoiding temptation while married -- is essentially a romance about a couple who are alone together only onstage. The two clearly are soul mates, but much stands between them including Johnny's equally passionate attraction to amphetamines. When June has had enough, Johnny's life spirals downward with an arrest, separation from his family and financial and health problems.

The decision to approach Johnny's life as a love story causes Mangold to neglect the development of Johnny's music. In fact, the movie implies that Johnny falls into his musical style and personality without giving it much thought. Despite the accomplished vocal work by Phoenix and Witherspoon, the film doesn't give us nearly enough of these two people as musicians.

The production is solid other than the fact that no one ages a bit. Photographed by Phedon Papamichael and edited by Michael McCusker, the concert footage is fine and energetic, while the leaps in time never feel jarring. All period details are accomplished without fuss. T-Bone Burnett expertly handles not only the score but also production of all the film's music.

WALK THE LINE

20th Century Fox

Fox 2000 Pictures presents a Tree Line Films/Catfish Prods. production

Credits:

Director: James Mangold

Screenwriters: Gill Dennis, James Mangold

Based on the books "Man in Black" and "Cash: The Autobiography" by: Johnny Cash

Producer: Cathy Konrad, James Keach

Executive producers: John Carter Cash, Alan C. Blomquist

Director of photography: Phedon Papamichael

Production designer: David J. Bomba

Costumes: Arianne Phillips

Music: T-Bone Burnett

Editor: Michael McCusker

Cast:

Johnny Cash: Joaquin Phoenix

June Carter: Reese Witherspoon

Vivian Cash: Ginnifer Goodwin

Ray Cash: Robert Patrick

Sam Phillips: Dallas Roberts

Carrie Cash: Shelby Lynne

Luther Perkins: Dan John Miller

Marshall Grant: Larry Bagby

Running time -- 136 minutes

MPAA rating: PG-13

See also

Credited With | External Sites