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Rick And Morty season 3 episode 5 review: The Whirly Dirly Conspiracy

Joe Matar Aug 21, 2017

Rick And Morty season 3 delivers yet another winning episode in The Whirly Dirly Conspiracy. Spoilers...

This review contains spoilers.

See related Game Of Thrones season 6 recap Game Of Thrones spinoffs: HBO not keen to "overexploit it” Game Of Thrones: 8 ideas for prequel spinoffs

3.5 The Whirly Dirly Conspiracy

I certainly didn’t expect two truly brilliant Rick And Morty episodes in succession and, furthermore, that The Whirly Dirly Conspiracy might even be better than Vindicators 3: The Return Of Worldender, but here we are.

Both episodes have razor-sharp, laugh-out-loud jokes throughout. Where Whirly Dirly has an edge over Worldender is that it takes the characters in completely new directions. With Community, Dan Harmon made a point of having a cast of characters who would be successfully entertaining, no matter how they were paired off, each configuration resulting in a fun and interesting dynamic. He and the other
See full article at Den of Geek »

Film Festival Roundup: AFI Fest Adds ‘La La Land’ Gala, London Awards Kelly Reichardt’s ‘Certain Women’ and More

  • Indiewire
Film Festival Roundup: AFI Fest Adds ‘La La Land’ Gala, London Awards Kelly Reichardt’s ‘Certain Women’ and More
Keep up with the always-hopping film festival world with our weekly Film Festival Roundup column. Check out last week’s Roundup right here.

Full Lineup Announcements

– “3-D Auteurs,” a 19-day, 34-film festival spotlighting stereoscopic movies by some of history’s most distinguished directors, will run at Film Forum November 11 – 29. The festival spans 3-D’s earliest days (including some turn-of-the-century films by pioneer Georges Méliès) to the present, and represents virtually every genre, including Westerns, Film Noir, and Science Fiction. Hollywood’s first big 3-D craze (sometimes called 3-D’s “golden era”), intended to offset the threat of television, came in the early 1950s, with such movies as Hitchcock’s “Dial M For Murder,” André De Toth’s “House of Wax” and Jack Arnold’s “Creature From the Black Lagoon” (all included in the series).

Hollywood produced roughly 50 movies in the process from 1952 to 1954, before fizzling out and being overtaken by
See full article at Indiewire »

NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Blow Out,’ ‘Chimes at Midnight,’ Hong Sang-soo & More

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

It’s a very De Palma weekend, with Dressed to Kill showing this Friday, Scarface and Blow Out on Saturday, and The Fury this Sunday.

Looney Tunes: Back In Action screens on Saturday.

Underground New York filmmaker Beth B. is celebrated in a weekend-long retrospective.

A new 16mm print of Kapauku plays on Sunday.

BAMcinématek
See full article at The Film Stage »

Jews in the News: World Premiere of 'Call Her Applebroog' at The Museum of Modern Art

  • Sydney's Buzz
"Call Her Applebroog" by Beth B is a poignant and intimate portrait of renowned artist, Ida Applebroog, who grew up in an Orthodox Jewish household with an immigrant father who only wanted to have sons; instead there were three girls. It is a cathartic story of self-realization and the act of art-making as a lifesaving parachute.

The film reveals Applebroog's groundbreaking artwork that has been an enduring enquiry into the polemics of human relations and power. More intimately, it is about her dynamic family relationships - a story that Beth knows well - Ida is her mother.

"Call Her Applebroog"  will have its world premiere on Friday February 26, 2016 at the Museum of Modern Art. Ida and Beth will be present at the screening for a Q&A.

Tickets will go on sale two weeks prior to the event 

The film is being distributed by Zeitgeist Films. A theatrical release is being planned for the summer.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Exclusive: Zeitgeist Picks Up Artist Documentary 'Call Her Applebroog'

  • Indiewire
Read More: Doc NYC Women Directors: Meet Beth B Zeitgeist Films has acquired "Call Her Applebroog," Beth B's documentary about her mother, Ida Applebroog, a painter, sculptor and filmmaker whose work often explores the themes of gender, sexual identity, violence, and politics. The film is a tableau of Applebroog’s groundbreaking work and, more intimately, her dynamic family relationships. The official synopsis reads: "'Call Her Applebroog' is a poignant and intimate portrait of Applebroog, who grew up in an Orthodox Jewish household with an immigrant father who only wanted to have sons; instead there were three girls. It is a cathartic story of self-realization and the act of art-making as a life-saving parachute." "We have known Beth B for a long time and could not admire her more as a pioneering, adventurous filmmaker," said Zeitgeist Co-Presidents Nancy Gerstman and Emily Russo in an official statement. "But to make such a loving.
See full article at Indiewire »

2014 Lausanne Underground Film Festival: Official Lineup

It’s lucky 13 — as in 13th annual edition — for Switzerland’s Lausanne Underground Film Festival, an epic celebration of cinematic weirdness, violence, filth and everything else that makes life worth living. The wild debauchery runs October 15-19.

The fest opens on Oct. 15 with the feature film debut by Leah Meyerhoff, I Believe in Unicorns, which tells the story of a troubled teenage girl who runs away with an aggressive older boy.

Other new films include the misanthropic comedy Buzzard by Joel Potrykus; the deep woods psychological thriller Mother Nature by Johan Liedgren; the complex Japanese drama Kept by Maki Mizui; and more.

Luff this year is really stuffed with great retrospectives beginning with a tribute to Beth B, who has been churning out controversial, thought-provoking flicks since the New York No Wave era to know. There will be screenings of her classic films, such as The Offenders and Salvation!, and her latest documentary,
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Burlesque Doc Exposed Is Better When It Shows Rather Than Tells

Burlesque Doc Exposed Is Better When It Shows Rather Than Tells
It can be less than compelling in real life to hear a burlesque performer explain how their routines are designed to challenge the beholder's preconceptions of gender or beauty or whatnot.

While there's a degree of such preaching in Beth B's Exposed, the doc will surely be eye-opening for those not already in the choir.

The picture follows eight burlesque performers based in New York, and features plenty of often-explicit footage of their acts. When Bambi the Mermaid pushes an egg out of her vagina — things emerging from vaginas and rectums is a recurring theme — and explains that the egg-laying is an homage to the trashy oeuvre of John Waters, Exposed hints at a less-explored, potentially more interesting theme than body politics: how what th...
See full article at Village Voice »

Exposed: Beyond Burlesque DVD Review

Director: Beth B

Starring: Rose Wood, World Famous *Bob*, Mat Fraser, Julie Atlas Muz, Bunny Love, Bambi The Mermaid, Dirty Martini, Tigger!, James Habacker

Running time: 78 minutes

Certificate: 15

If the title Exposed: Beyond Burlesque catches your eye purely for the word ‘burlesque’ then I’m afraid, my friend, you have picked the wrong film.

Starring a melee of talent, this documentary delves into New York City’s underground performance art scene, with interviews from several different – and definitely unique – performers. From the 1980s onwards, these artists have used the style of burlesque dancing to inform, aggrevate, and politicize their messages, ranging from a dance featuring a nipple-tasseled Lady Justice, to a satirical act focusing on a rabbi (and yes, the male performer is naked from the waist down). Although many of the acts shown are ‘piss take’ pieces, many of the performers had led shy, sheltered lives before taking up the profession,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

'Exposed' by Beth B at MoMA and IFC Center

After six years of hard work, Beth B and co-producer Sandra Schulberg are finally releasing their feature film, Exposed,which is currently showing at the Institute of Contemporary Art, London, and will be showing at the Museum of Modern Art on March 3rd, and will have a theatrical run at the IFC Center, NYC beginning March 13th.

Exposed is about liberation of the self, the body and the mind. The film focuses on performance artists who have been featured at the Whitney Biennale, Ps 122, and Deitch Projects. These performers are a new generation of artists who are declaring their freedom of expression as Robert Mapplethorpe and Karen Finley did.

The film had its world premiere at the Berlin Film Festival and was nominated Best Documentary Film, has shown in over 30 film festivals worldwide, and had its U.S. premiere at Doc NYC. It has received extraordinary international press (Top Ten Film in Time Magazine Lightbox and Filmmaker Magazine) and has been touring the world (Moscow, Taiwan, Norway, Australia...).

The filmmakers are coordinating the combination of live performances and film screenings that create a phenomenal event and great exposure for the venues, performers and the film. The audience they have seen at the screenings is very diverse including: art world, Lgbt, students, feminists, burlesque, disability, and human rights groups (it was shown at the Nuremberg Human Rights Festival!).

Below are quotes from several rave reviews

"One of the most revealing portraits yet of the marginal performance medium, the film is likely to blow the cobwebs off any preconceptions viewers might have about gender, sexuality, empowerment and the body."

Read more: Doc NYC 2013: Highlights From the Largest Documentary Festival in the U.S. - LightBox http://lightbox.time.com/2013/11/13/doc-nyc-2013-highlights-from-the-largest-documentary-festival-in-the-u-s/#ixzz2pqB77LEO

What the Critics Are Saying

"Beth B turns her all-embracing camera on the alternate burlesque scene in the intelligent and enjoyably outrageous 'Exposed." –Variety

There is a philosophy behind all of the performances in Exposed. Provocation is the weapon of choice against a society that seeks to limit what is considered to be outside the norms, “the other.” -- Die Tageszeitung

Exposed is a wonderful film that I think you will appreciate and enjoy!

Warm Regards,

Beth B

http://21stcenturyburlesque.com/exposed-beyond-burlesque-screening-at-the-ica-london/

http://www.close-upfilm.com/2014/01/exposed-burlesque-18-film-review/

http://www.littlewhitelies.co.uk/theatrical-reviews/exposed-beyond-burlesque-25685

http://www.standard.co.uk/goingout/film/exposed-beyond-burlesque--film-review-9050818.html

Exposed…as reviewed in Little White Lies:

Director Beth B takes us a whirlwind journey through the intoxicating world of body performance.

It’s tempting to write burlesque off as glorified stripping, but director Beth B’s unique documentary shows the human body as a great performance art canvas for those brave or extroverted enough to use it. Her six-years-in-the-making film homes in on performers that use nudity, not to titillate — although that's involved — but to serve witty and inventive routines on gender, sexuality and politics. You ain't seen a Us justice system satire till you've seen a Us justice system satire called 'The Patriot Act' featuring a buxom, glitter-spangled blonde stuffing dollar bills in her mouth.

A composite of performances and interviews, Exposed works as both an X-rated cabaret show and analyses of its subjects’ motivations for letting us see everything. Whether its Mat Fraser taking ownership of his thalidomide-induced disability, Dirty Martini arabesqueing a fuck-you to instructors who said her body was wrong for dance, Rose Wood refusing to bolt himself into one gender or The World Famous *Bob* explaining a novel form of transexualism, the common thread is of individuals taking control of themselves and sharing this liberation with an audience.

"There is freedom in vulgarity" smiles Bunny Love, the most conventionally attractive of the bunch. She is perfectly aware of what she calls her "juicy" qualities and uses them to create performances that disturb and transfix in equal measure. "This is all just an illusion," she says of hair, eyelashes, lips, waist and boobs, "I can put it on and I can fake you out but it’s so much more complicated than that." These complexities are expressed via a maniacal on stage unravelling, like if Blanche DuBois’ spirit was embedded in the body of Marilyn Monroe and we saw her work at the Flamingo Hotel.

This act is the first of a run of performances that never dip in quality or boundary-pushing content. Beth B has found the best in the business and won their trust before channelling their symbiotic urges to opine and entertain. Dumb vessels for objectification do not live at this address. Instead we have eight character studies heartily engaged in the struggle to express themselves in nuance. All have learnt (the hard way) that, to get all Oscar Wilde: "If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh, otherwise they'll kill you."

Through a camera that repeatedly finds interviewees at dressing tables where the careful transformation from everyday person to feathery, glittery peacock is happening, Beth B replicates her subjects' obsession with glamour and the performance possibilities offered by costume. Yet just as their work is to take it all off, so too it is for Ms B, who finds them make-up free after a gig, or going to a friend's birthday in *gosh* jeans. Focus is not on getting carried with shimmer and lights but in using our gravitation towards such things to tell different stories.

Just one of these stories would be refreshing but Exposed has gone all-out, providing a luxurious sweet store of perspectives as coherent as they are unconventional. Knitted into the seams of this celebration of countercultural entertainment are circumspect moments delivered and captured so lightly that those seduced by the viewpoints on offer will feel drawn to watch and rewatch.

"I don’t like to perpetuate perfection because I think flaws are more interesting," says Bambi the Mermaid, best known for her 'egg-laying'. It's a point-of-view we need at a time when Photoshopping images of beautiful celebrities is du jour and it's a point-of-view adopted with absolute commitment by Bambi and everyone else prepared to show us who they are with nothing on.

--

www.exposedmovie.com

www.bethbproductions.com
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

12 Years A Slave, The Railway Man, The Square: this week's new films

12 Years A Slave | The Railway Man | Delivery Man | After Tiller | 1: Life On The Limit | Exposed: Beyond Burlesque

12 Years A Slave (15)

(Steve McQueen, 2013, Us/UK) Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Fassbender, Lupita Nyong'o, Benedict Cumberbatch, Paul Dano. 134 mins

What with the acclaim, the awards buzz and the harrowing subject matter, finally seeing McQueen's slavery drama now feels like a duty. But this is an "issue movie" unlike any other, both in its deliberate formalism and its under-represented history. Along with Ejiofor's abductee, we're fully immersed in a slavery system so brutally oppressive even the expression of suffering is forbidden. McQueen gives us a study of institutionalised cruelty, the forces propping it up and its innumerable victims.

The Railway Man (15)

(Jonathan Teplitzky, 2013, Aus/UK) Colin Firth, Nicole Kidman. 116 mins

Middle-aged romance is rapidly derailed by events of the past in this earnest bio-drama, as Kidman spurs Scotsman Firth to revisit his Asian prisoner-of-war days,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Exposed: Beyond Burlesque – review | Peter Bradshaw

Beth B looks at something you might call Burlesque 2.0, building on the naughty showgirl personae with political satire

The noble mission of burlesque is to reclaim erotic cabaret from the commercial chill of lap-dancing clubs and restore some of the style, theatricality and artistry of days gone by (although the nostalgically remembered turns may have been regarded at the time with the same disapproval as today's pole-dancing venues). This documentary from Beth B looks at something you might call Burlesque 2.0, building on the naughty showgirl personae and retro chic, and taking in performance art and political satire; it's burlesque that looks at body image, sexual identity and cis and transgender issues. But there's a fair bit of narcissism and self-satisfaction here. I'm bound to say burlesque may be something that has to be experienced live, not on screen. Burlesque requires mischief and mystery; somehow this low-cost doc reduces both.

Rating: 2/5

DocumentaryBurlesqueTransgenderTheatrePeter Bradshaw

theguardian.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Going Beyond Burlesque with Beth B’s Exposed

“How do you cover up cellulite? With glitter and a spotlight.” These words of wisdom from the legendary NYC, splendidly zaftig, female drag queen World Famous *Bob* pretty much sum up the ethos of legendary NYC, underground filmmaker Beth B’s latest doc-extravaganza Exposed, a behind-the-scenes peep at today’s proudly subversive burlesque movement. Its performers include folks like Rose Wood, a biologically male strip-teaser brought into the scene by biologically female drag queen Dirty Martini, and Mat Fraser, perhaps the sexiest Seal Boy – also the name of his critically-hailed one-man show – on the planet. (Sorry boys and girls, this […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Wide preps slate for autumn markets

  • ScreenDaily
French sales outfit Wide Management has added a slew of titles in recent months.

Tiff contemporary world cinema premiere Ningen, about a Japanese CEO under pressure to save his company, is the second feature from Noor directors Cagla Zencirci and Guillaume Giovanetti.

Portuguese drama Bobo, by Ines Oliveira, plays in the Tiff discovery programme. The feature follows two women who unite over their mutual desire to protect a child.

Vinko Bresan’s Karlovy Vary competition comedy The Priest’s Children has sold to a number of European territories while Jean-Louis Daniel’s Paris-set Shanghai Belle, also in-demand, tells the story of young models discovering a life of drugs, sex and prostitution.

Also on the slate are Snails in the Rain by Yariv Mozer, Letters of a Portuguese Nun, Rene Feret’s The Film to Come, and Us comedy Only in New York, in which a stand-up has a novel take on the Israel-Palestine conflict.

Wide has also
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Classic Music Video: Sonic Youth’s Death Valley 69

Embedded above is the first music video ever produced for the legendary art rock band Sonic Youth, “Death Valley 69,” the eighth and final track on their 1985 album Bad Moon Rising. This is also the first music video that was co-directed by Richard Kern, one of the leading figures of the Cinema of Transgression movement. The song and the video are a perfect time capsule blend of audio and images from the raging punk scene coming out of NYC’s Lower East Side in the ’80s.

According to Jack Sargeant‘s definitive history of the Cinema of Transgression, Deathtripping, Judith Barry was originally hired to direct the video with Kern only hired to do the gore makeup special effects. However, Kern would end up co-directing along with Barry. (The video’s on-screen credits, listed in full below, also credit Sonic Youth as a co-director.)

The final video ends up being
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Underground Photography Show Opening: Atrocity Exhibitions

Jack Sargeant, director of the Revelation Perth International Film Festival, has co-curated a photography show with Linsey Gosper that will have its opening at the Alaska Projects gallery in Sydney, Australia on Tuesday, August 21 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

While the show is untitled, it has been colloquially named “Atrocity Exhibitions” and will feature photographs by a number of underground filmmakers and other artists. The show will be on display from the 21st to the 26th.

Inspired by the experimental novel by J G Ballard The Atrocity Exhibition, this photography show will explore “the emergence of new manifestations of the psychosexual unconscious.” The images document unusual fetishes and unleashed urges that emerge “from the collusion of urban zones and economics, amputated urges and personal explorations of seduction and desire.”

Artists represented in the show include transgressive filmmaker Usama Alshaibi and underground icon Lydia Lunch, as well as work by Romain Slocombe,
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Guest Post: Beth B "Who Says An Old Punk Can't Learn New Tricks?"

I moved to NYC in the early 80's with dreams of making films that would change the world. To prime my path, I was prepared to serve first. There were two internships I wanted. Having grown up listening to Alan Lomax's Southern Journey records, he was one. He didn't hire me. The Super-8 No Wave film thing was taking the city by storm--or at least the East Village. I turned my sights to working for Beth B, one of the key figures in the "Cinema Of Transgression". I got the interview... but not the gig. Although I have had to…
See full article at Hope for Film »

Blank City – Official Trailer

Featuring Jim Jarmusch, Debbie Harry, Steve Buscemi, John Lurie, Fab 5 Freddy, Thurston Moore,

Richard Kern, Lydia Lunch, Amos Poe, Eric Mitchell, James Nares, Maripol, Ann Magnuson,

James Chance, Beth B, Scott B and John Waters

A Film By

Opening at the IFC Center in New York on Friday, April 6

Before there was HD there was Super 8. Before Independent film there was Underground Cinema. And before New York there was.well, New York. Once upon a pre-Facebook time, before creative communities became virtual and viral, cultural movements were firmly grounded in geography. And the undisputed center of American . some would say international . art and film was New York City. In particular, downtown Manhattan in the late 1970.s and 80.s was the anchor of vanguard filmmaking.

Blank City tells the long-overdue tale of the motley crew of renegade filmmakers that emerged from an economically bankrupt and dangerous period of New York History.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Blank City Final Poster

Featuring Jim Jarmusch, Debbie Harry, Steve Buscemi, John Lurie, Fab 5 Freddy, Thurston Moore,

Richard Kern, Lydia Lunch, Amos Poe, Eric Mitchell, James Nares, Maripol, Ann Magnuson,

James Chance, Beth B, Scott B and John Waters

A Film By

Opening at the IFC Center in New York on Friday, April 6

Before there was HD there was Super 8. Before Independent film there was Underground Cinema. And before New York there was.well, New York. Once upon a pre-Facebook time, before creative communities became virtual and viral, cultural movements were firmly grounded in geography. And the undisputed center of American . some would say international . art and film was New York City. In particular, downtown Manhattan in the late 1970.s and 80.s was the anchor of vanguard filmmaking.

Blank City tells the long-overdue tale of the motley crew of renegade filmmakers that emerged from an economically bankrupt and dangerous period of New York History.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Underground Film Links: February 13, 2010

Tomorrow might be Valentine’s Day, but how about showing these great sites some love today?

To start things off on an inappropriately sleazy note: The Phantom of Pulp has several awesome — and one extra incredible — poster for one of my favorite horror movies, Maniac. “Underground film” means different things all over the world. In China, it just means government-repressed artists just trying to express themselves. Candlelight Stories has the full documentary Digital Underground in the People’s Republic by Rachel Tejada. Kimberly Chun as a lengthy dip into the current San Francisco experimental film scene on the site Bold Italic. Not sure what it is recently, but I keep digging up classic Chicago Underground Film Festival info. This week it’s the poster from their 4th edition designed by acclaimed graphic novelist Chris Ware. That’s from 1997 when the special guests were John Waters and Beth B. Also from
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

See also

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