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More Competition & Special Films Announced For The 2018 Berlinale

Hasan Majuni. Khook (Pig)

Another ten films have now been invited to the Competition of the 68th edition of the Berlin International Film Festival. Three more have also been selected for the programme of the Berlinale Special.

Joining the eight Competition films and two Berlinale Special titles are 13 productions from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Brazil, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hong Kong – China, Iran, Ireland, Luxembourg, Norway, Paraguay, People’s Republic of China, Romania, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Uruguay, and the USA.

They come from the likes of Christian Petzold, Emily Atef, Lance Daly, Marcelo Martinessi, Cédric Kahn, Adina Pintilie, Markus Imhoof, Mani Haghighi, Måns Månsson and Axel Petersén, David and Nathan Zellner in the Competition programme and Raman Hui, Fernando Solanas, Paul Williams in the Berlinale Special.

The following films will be celebrating world or international premieres in the Competition of the Berlinale 2018.

3 Tage in Quiberon (3 Days in Quiberon
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Robert Pattinson, Christian Petzold movies join Berlin Film Festival Competition

Robert Pattinson, Christian Petzold movies join Berlin Film Festival Competition
Christian Petzold, Emily Atef, Lance Daly join Berlinale.

Source: Great Point Media

‘Damsel’

Another ten films have joined the Competition of the 68th edition of the Berlin International Film Festival (Feb 15 - 25). Three more have also been selected for the programme of the Berlinale Special.

Joining the eight Competition films and two Berlinale Special titles are 13 productions from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Brazil, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hong Kong - China, Iran, Ireland, Luxembourg, Norway, Paraguay, People’s Republic of China, Romania, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Uruguay, and the USA.

Joining the main competition are Barbara and Phoenix director Christian Petzold’s new drama Transit, a contemporary reworking of Anna Seghers’ 1944 novel about refugees attempting to flee through Marseille after the Nazi invasion of France in 1940. The film stars Frantz breakout Paula Beer.

Also new to competition is David and Nathan Zellner’s Damsel, the western about a Us businessman who travels to join his fiancée
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Robert Pattinson, Christian Petzold movies join Berlin Competition

Robert Pattinson, Christian Petzold movies join Berlin Competition
Christian Petzold, Emily Atef, Lance Daly join Berlinale.

Source: Great Point Media

‘Damsel’

Another ten films have joined the Competition of the 68th edition of the Berlin International Film Festival. Three more have also been selected for the programme of the Berlinale Special.

Joining the eight Competition films and two Berlinale Special titles are 13 productions from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Brazil, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hong Kong - China, Iran, Ireland, Luxembourg, Norway, Paraguay, People’s Republic of China, Romania, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Uruguay, and the USA.

Additional films for both categories are due to be revealed soon. Films announced today are:

Competition

3 Tage in Quiberon (3 Days in Quiberon)

Germany / Austria / France

By Emily Atef (Molly’s Way, The Stranger In Me)

With Marie Bäumer, Birgit Minichmayr, Charly Hübner, Robert Gwisdek, Denis Lavant

World premiere

Black 47

Ireland / Luxembourg

By Lance Daly (Kisses, The Good Doctor)

With Hugo Weaving, James Frecheville, Stephen Rea, [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Film Is A Work Like Any Other: Talking with Christian Petzold and Christoph Hochhäusler

  • MUBI
Christian Petzold's The State I Am In (2000) and Christoph Hochhäusler's The City Below (2010) will be showing in September and October, 2017 on Mubi in most countries around the world.Christian Petzold (left) and Christoph Hochhäusler (right) on the set of Dreileben. Photo by Felix von Böhm.We meet in Christian Petzold’s office in Berlin-Kreuzberg. A giant wall of whispering books, almost like a Borgesian brain of fiction, encircles the table at which Christoph Hochhäusler, myself and the owner take place to discuss their films. The idea of the interview was to get Petzold’s take on Hochhäusler’s The City Below (2010) and Hochhäusler’s take on Petzold’s The State I Am In (2000). In the end, both filmmakers ended up talking about a lot more, as cinema for them has always been something that shines most brightly when remembering it, discussing it and loving it. The fictions proposed
See full article at MUBI »

Tales of Two Halves: Christian Petzold's "The State I Am In" and Christoph Hochhäusler's "The City Below"

  • MUBI
Christian Petzold's The State I Am In (2000) and Christoph Hochhäusler's The City Below (2010) will be showing in September and October, 2017 on Mubi in most countries around the world.How can we hang on to a dreamHow can it, will it be the way it seems—Tim Hardin, “How Can We Hang On to a Dream”“When you live in no man’s land, you get stuck with your memories.”—Clara, The State I Am In1. Lovers go on the run while a teenager falls in love. Christian Petzold’s first theatrical feature, The State I Am In (2000), tells two stories simultaneously: that of Hans (Richy Müller) and Clara (Barbara Auer), fugitives pursued by German authorities, and that of their long-suffering daughter Jeanne (Julia Hummer)—who is downcast from the film’s opening scene, in which she meets a German boy named Heinrich (Bilge Bingül) at the beach.Though
See full article at MUBI »

Venice Film Review: ‘Krieg’

Krieg” means “war,” but in German director Rick Ostermann’s sophomore film, his second to play in the Horizons sidebar in Venice after debut “Wolfskinder,” the war is a cold one. This is literal, with half the film taking place on an icy, isolated Austrian mountaintop, but also figurative in that the conflict between the story’s two separate time frames feels attritional, with the actual catharsis of dramatic confrontation between the two strands remaining frustratingly minimal. The movie is elegantly shot, and lean as a line of sight down the barrel of a long-range rifle. But it fails to cohere internally and its endothermic nature makes it difficult to warm to as a viewer: From allusive beginning to enigmatic ending, “Krieg” remains as remote as a snowbound Alpine hideaway.

That hideaway is a one-time sculptor’s cabin toward which we see a tiny figure struggle through the thick snow in the film’s desolate opening. Arnold
See full article at Variety - Film News »

James Schamus’ Directorial Debut ‘Indignation’ to Play in Berlin Film Festival’s Panorama

James Schamus’ Directorial Debut ‘Indignation’ to Play in Berlin Film Festival’s Panorama
London — Berlin Film Festival section Panorama has added further films to its lineup, which will include “Indignation,” the directorial debut of producer James Schamus. Panorama also revealed that a Special Teddy Award, which celebrates gay and lesbian filmmaking, will be awarded to Christine Vachon, one of the producers of “Carol.”

The Panorama Special program will open on Feb. 12 with Daniel Burman’s “El rey del Once” (The Tenth Man), and the previously announced “War on Everyone” by John Michael McDonagh. “El rey del Once,” the festival said, is “a sensitive tale that bursts with vitality, a loving portrait of multi-layered life in Once, the Jewish quarter of Buenos Aires.” Burman’s debut film, “A Chrysanthemum Bursts in Cinco Esquinas,” opened the main program of Panorama in 1998, and his 2004 film “Lost Embrace” won two Silver Bears in Berlin.

Indignation,” which is based on Philip Roth’s novel, centers on a young
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Review: The Book Thief

  • Comicmix
The Coming of Age book has become fodder for dystopian science fiction and fantasy while some of the toughest Worldbuilding is done right here, on the planet Earth. Things don’t get more dystopian than growing up in Nazi Germany during World War II. As captured by Austrian author Markus Zusak, The Book Thief is a harrowing, sorrowful tale about life during wartime. The 2005 novel is amusingly narrated by Death and tells of his fascination with Liesel Meminger (Sophie Nélisse), who comes to his attention when collecting her brother.

The novel has been justly feted over the years and the inevitable film adaptation arrived in November and is now out on disc from 20th Century Home Entertainment. The film is faithful without fully capturing the novel’s tone, aided by some solid performances, excellent production design and a John Williams score that justly earned an Academy Award nomination without imitating his Schindler’s List,
See full article at Comicmix »

The Book Thief review: don’t mention the war…

Thoughtful tweens and teens interested in history and unusual adventurous stories of kids their own age should love this, but adults may find the lightness of the tone off-putting. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

I have not read the source material

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

I haven’t read the Markus Zusa novel this is based on, but what ended up on the screen makes me suspect that it might be one of those unfilmmable books that should probably have been left alone. On the one hand, this is a tale of a tough, plucky young girl — that alone is rare enough to be cheered — who loves books and loves reading, which doubles the reason for applauding it. On the other hand, this is essentially a kids’ movie about life in Nazi Germany, and it ends up being
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Film Review: ‘The Book Thief’ Fails to Find Tone of Familiar Story

Chicago – Brian Percival’s “The Book Thief,” from the hit book by Markus Zusak, is a well-intentioned piece of work that nonetheless fails, sometimes spectacularly, to connect in the ways that its creators intend.

Tonally adrift between something clearly aimed at young adults and something much darker and more cynical about the nature of man and the afterlife, the film is only carried at all by the strengths of its talented leads – Geoffrey Rush, Emily Watson, and the remarkable Sophie Nelisse.

Try as they may, these talented performers can’t overcome the overall work’s notable flaws, even if one senses that the hearts of all involved are in the right place.

Rating: 2.0/5.0

Zusak’s book was narrated by Death himself and Percival and his team make the daring move of keeping a lot of that narration intact. So “The Book Thief” opens with a the voice of Death (Roger Allam
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

The Book Thief Movie Review

  • ShockYa
The Book Thief Movie Review
The Book Thief – Movie Review 20th Century Fox Reviewed for Shockya by Harvey Karten. Data-based on RottenTomatoes.com Grade: B+ Director: Brian Percival Screenwriter: Michael Petroni Cast: Geoffrey Rush, Emily Watson, Sophie Nélisse, Barbara Auer, Ben Schnetzer, Nico Liersch, Levin Liam, Roger Allam Screened at: Paris Theater, NYC, 11/4/13 Opens: November 8, 2013 When I was a kid during World War 2, I would note that everyone on the subway would be reading a newspaper, usually the Daily News, the Daily Mirror, or the NY Post. Take a look nowadays and you’ll likely find nobody with a paper in hand but many, instead, with a gadget that appears glued to [ Read More ]

The post The Book Thief Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Film Review: ‘The Book Thief’

Film Review: ‘The Book Thief’
Markus Zusak’s international bestseller “The Book Thief” has been brought to the screen with quiet effectiveness and scrupulous taste by director Brian Percival and writer Michael Petroni. This tale of Nazi Germany seen from a child’s perspective translates into solidly engaging drama, albeit one that may not be starry, flashy or epic enough to muscle its way into the front ranks of awards-season contenders. Bolstered by the novel’s fans, the Fox release (which opens limited Nov. 8) should ride solid reviews and word of mouth to midlevel prestige returns in line with such comparable medium-scaled WWII dramas as “The Reader” and “The Pianist.”

Petroni streamlines or eliminates some peripheral characters and subplots without compromising the book’s essence. Like its source, the film is narrated by Death (voiced by Roger Allam), who says at the start that he seldom bothers with the living, but took a particular interest
See full article at Variety - Film News »

2007 German Film Awards noms: Perfume vs. Four Minutes

  • Last year The Lives of Others cleaned up the "German Oscars", with eight nominations apiece, this year we find a tight race between Tom TykwerTom Tykwer
[/link]'s take on the Patrick Suskind novel a prison drama by helmer Chris Kraus. Perfume - The Story of a Murderer got a theatrical release stateside in late December. The Golden and Silver Lolas will be presented in a gala ceremony in Berlin on May 4. Here are the noms:Best Feature Film Emma's Bliss (dir: Sven Taddicken)The Counterfeiters (dir: Stefan Ruzowitzky)Perfume - The Story Of A Murderer (dir: Tom Tykwer)Four Minutes (dir: Chris Kraus)Grave Decisions (dir: Marcus H. Rosenmueller)Winter Journey (dir: Hans Steinbichler)Best Documentary The Short Life of Jose Antonio Gutierrez (dir: Heidi Specogna)Working Man's Death (dir: Michael Glawogger)Best Children's and Youth Film Hände Weg Vom Mississippi (dir: Detlev Buck)The Cloud (dir: Gregor Schnitzler)Best Direction
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

FESTIVAL REVIEWS: The inaugural Made in Germany film festival, presented by the Export-Union of German Cinema, ran Nov. 3-9 at the Music Hall Theatre in Beverly Hills.

IN JULY

The well-liked opening film of the festival and a top 10 hit in Germany when it opened in late August, writer-director Fatih Akin's "In July", his second feature, is a fairly traditional romance in the guise of an offbeat road movie.

Moritz Bleibtreu of "Run Lola Run" plays tall, handsome and lovestruck Daniel. Unfortunately for the equally attractive and romantically inclined Juli, which is German for July and the month in which the story takes place, Daniel is not on a quest to win her heart.

The story begins in Hamburg, Germany, and features misadventures in Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria. Physics professor Daniel tries to reach Istanbul, Turkey, for a rendezvous with a beautiful girl he's only seen once or twice. He picks up carefree Juli, played by Christiane Paul, as a traveling companion. The pair met earlier on the sidewalk, when he bought a ring from her. She has chosen him for his manly awkwardness and big heart. He's doesn't pay attention to her, but he can't get along without her.

Unpredictable in a few places and always watchable because of the charismatic duo of Bleibtreu and Paul, "In July" has a terrific soundtrack and a few magical cinematic moments that define true love and prove more effective than the usual mainstream approach.

THE STATE I AM IN

A strong role for up-and-coming actress Julia Hummer (who has a small but memorable part in "Gigantic"), "The State I Am In" is a tense coming-of-age drama about the rebellious daughter of rebellious parents.

Clara (Barbara Auer) and Hans (Richy Muller) are always saying that things will get better. With teenage daughter Jeanne (Hummer), they are hiding out on the coast of Portugal, waiting to move to Sao Paulo, Brazil, and assume new identities.

Although it's never clearly established what past crimes they are guilty of, Jeanne's mom and dad set out to rob a bank in Germany. While Jeanne is a knowing part of their plan, she increasingly resists their attempts to stop her from having a boyfriend. A surfer she meets on the beach, Heinrich (Bilge Bingul), says he's just a "McJobber who loves Brian Wilson," but Jeanne falls in love as best she can. Believably complicated and unable to escape participation in the bloody finale, she is scarred but still standing at the end of director Christian Petzold's tightly wound fourth feature.

FORGET AMERICA

Set mostly in the German town of Aschersleben, this semicomical romantic triangle finds David Marek Harloff) and Benno (Roman Knizka), two best friends who are stuck in a rut, both falling for Anna (Franziska Petri), a would-be actress from nearby Halle. The first solo feature from Munich-based director Vanessa Jopp, "Forget America" is fairly tame but involving. The screenplay by Maggie Peren certainly gives plenty of frustrating moments to lead character David, a photographer who initially lets Benno get the upper hand and spends the rest of the movie regretting it.

The three actors are engagingly attuned to the young and moderately reckless milieu, which includes Benno's business selling vintage American cars and David's dingy life at home with a skinhead younger brother and disabled father. Anna comes in and out of their lives, spending most of her energy on violently emotional Benno while giving David discouraging signals over his obvious infatuation with her. All three unexpectedly underachieve in their dream careers. In the resulting tension, Benno starts to self-destruct, causing Anna to drift toward David.

GIGANTIC

Co-produced by Tom Tykwer ("Run Lola Run") and directed by one of the actors in that film, Sebastian Schipper, "Gigantic" is an X Filme Creative Pool production that bowed stateside at the 2000 Sundance Film Festival. A bit loopy in the storytelling department -- a lot of comedy, adventure and drama is packed into the film's one long night -- "Gigantic" is satisfying enough to interest festival audiences. The character-driven piece follows three male friends in Hamburg, Germany. One of the friends is leaving for faraway places and probably is never coming back.

Walter (Antoine Monot Jr.) owns a big muscle car that transports him and pals Ricco (Florian Lukas) and Floyd (Frank Giering) on a round of adventuring that includes several run-ins with a troupe of angry, Elvis-themed circus performers. Ricco is the noisy daredevil of the group, but reliable Walter and gloomy Floyd -- the one leaving -- are not ones to walk away from a challenge.

They get their wish to experience "gigantic" things when a high-stakes Foosball game with a formidable opponent named Snake goes their way. The game is a lengthy, imaginatively executed sequence. The melancholy sentiments of the night climax when their underage, party-girl companion Telsa (Julia Hummer) almost dies from alcohol poisoning.

David Hunter

See also

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