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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

1-20 of 37 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Oscars: Israel Selects 'Foxtrot' for Foreign-Language Category

19 September 2017 4:44 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Israel has picked Samuel Maoz’s Foxtrot as its official submission for Oscar consideration in the best foreign-language film category.

The drama, which won the Grand Jury Prize at the Venice International Film Festival earlier this month, also took home eight Ophir Awards, awarded by the Israeli Academy of Film and Television, including best lead actor for Lior Ashkenazi (A Late Wedding), best director for Maoz and best film.

Foxtrot follows an affluent Tel Aviv family through gut-wrenching grief over the death of their son, a soldier in the Israel Defense Force, and continues to examine both the strength and the »

- David Caspi

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Israel’s ‘Foxtrot’ Sweeps Ophir Awards to Become Country’s Oscar Entry

19 September 2017 1:44 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Samuel Maoz’s “Foxtrot” swept the Ophir Awards — Israel’s version of the Academy Awards — on Tuesday night, taking home eight statues including best picture of the year. The film will now represent Israel in the race for the Oscar for Best Foreign Film.

Earlier this month, “Foxtrot” earned the Silver Lion grand jury prize at the Venice Film Festival, and had been widely tipped to win at home long before the ceremony opened. The film also picked up trophies for best director, best actor, cinematography, editing, music, artistic design and soundtrack.

Israel’s Ophir Awards, held in the port city of Ashdod just before the country takes a communal pause to celebrate the Jewish New Year, is the annual holy of holies for the Israeli film industry, and its most anticipated gathering.

But most noticeable about Tuesday night’s audience was who was not present: Miri Regev, the nation’s firebrand culture minister, was »

- Debra Kamin

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Memo to Distributors: Buy These 2017 Tiff Movies

19 September 2017 9:47 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Toronto International Film Festival may be known more as a platform for fall season movies than a market, but there are plenty of strong films in each year’s lineup looking for U.S. distribution. While films ranging from the Margot Robbie vehicle “I, Tonya” to Louis C.K.’s “I Love You, Daddy” landed sturdy deals during Tiff, many other highlights remain homeless. Here’s a look at a few of them, presented in the hopes that distributors will take note.

Bodied

If Eminem got a PhD in English without sacrificing his hip-hop talent, he might have turned out something like Adam (Calum Worthy), the scrawny white hero of Joseph Kahn’s “Bodied.” Kahn’s long-awaited follow-up to his snarky teen slasher comedy “Detention” is a hyper-stylized rap satire that plays out like Scott Pilgrim stumbling into “8 Mile” and stealing the spotlight. Set in an assaultive world of underground »

- Eric Kohn, David Ehrlich and Anne Thompson

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The Shape Of Water wins Golden Lion by Amber Wilkinson - 2017-09-09 21:09:08

9 September 2017 1:09 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

The Shape Of Water: 'The right mix of aesthetics, heart and sheer technical mastery' Photo: Fox Searchlight Guillermo Del Toro's The Shape Of Water has taken home the Golden Lion at Venice Film Festival.

"I believe in life, I believe in love and I believe in cinema," said the director as he picked up the award for his film about a mute cleaning woman who falls for a fish-man (Doug Jones). He added: "If you remain pure and stay with your faith, whatever you have faith in, in my case it's monsters, eventually things go right."

The Silver Lion Grand Jury prize went to Samuel Maoz's satire Foxtrot, starring Lior Ashkenazi and Sarah Adler, while Xavier Legrand saw his domestic abuse drama Custody pick up the Lion of The Future and Silver Lion for best director.

The best actress award went to Charlotte Rampling for her role »

- Amber Wilkinson

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Venice Review: ‘Foxtrot’ is a Drama of Originality and Sheer Vitality

7 September 2017 6:17 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

The discovery of fresh, bold voices in cinema has always been one of the great joys of visiting film festivals. And this year in Venice, probably no film in competition surprised more for its original touch and sheer vitality than Samuel Maoz’s Israel-set drama Foxtrot.

After an unexplained opening shot looking out from inside an anonymous moving vehicle, we soon meet Daphna Feldmann (Sarah Adler), whose son Jonathan (Yonathan Shiray) with husband Michael (Lior Ashkenazi) serves in the military. Meeting might be overstating it in this instance, as Daphna only looks into the camera for a split second and, without even hearing a word from her unseen visitors, faints. Her reaction is one of such utterly debilitating grief, it tells you right away who she finds at her doorstep and what they’re about to say. Indeed, it’s the worst nightmare of any soldier’s mom incarnated: grim-faced »

- Zhuo-Ning Su

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Venice Film Review: ‘The Cousin’

7 September 2017 1:32 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

There are three tones in actor-director Tzahi Grad’s “The Cousin,” an uneven semi-thriller that starts as a discomfiting story of Israeli-Palestinian prejudice, cranks it up beyond credibility and then inexplicably shifts into comedy territory in the last 10 minutes, just when a lynching appears to be brewing. Maybe building up all that tension and then popping it like a big balloon was meant to allow audiences to feel better about themselves, but letting everyone off the hook after making them question their deep-seated racism is disingenuous at best. It’s a pity, because the first two-thirds work well in exposing the distrust even so-called open-minded people feel about the “other” in their midst, inviting comparisons with “Get Out.”

Grad’s personal investment in the project is high: As star as well as writer and director, he plays Naftali, a version of himself, filming in his own home and casting his two kids Ben and Alma Grad Cohen »

- Jay Weissberg

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Foxtrot review – Samuel Maoz's fierce nightmare vision of Israel

4 September 2017 4:31 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Lebanon director’s unflinching family tragedy, set in a surreal Israel where loss and pain are randomly distributed, offers an urgent and witty picture of futility

Foxtrot, by the Israeli film-maker Samuel Maoz, is a compelling family tragedy played out in three acts; a nightmarish triptych of loss, waste and grief that is nonetheless arranged with such visionary boldness that it dares us to look away. Maoz won the 2009 Golden Lion here at Venice with Lebanon, his last film but one, which pundits suspect may count against him this time around. And yet Foxtrot makes a mockery of that kind of received wisdom and formal protocol. The world, it tells us, is random and inept – as likely to kill you by mistake as on purpose. I’m not sure the film sees this as amusing, exactly. But it has the wherewithal and wit to manage the odd hollow laugh. »

- Xan Brooks

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‘Foxtrot’ Is a Brilliant Portrait of Israeli Frustrations — Telluride Review

3 September 2017 6:12 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Foxtrot” spends its first half hour as a bleak drama about distraught parents mourning their dead son, and then it becomes something entirely different. Israeli director Samuel Maoz’s brilliant followup to his debut “Lebanon,” which took place within the confines of a tank, deals with a very different kind of confinement — being imprisoned by an ambivalent world, and forced to deal with whatever random tragedies it chooses to dish out.

Yet despite its dreary overtones, Maoz pierces his milieu with flashes of perceptive satire, an animated interlude, and a touching, romantic finale, all of which adds up to a wonderfully unexpected hodgepodge of insights into intergenerational Israeli frustrations.

But the first act belies the depth in store. Starting out as a straightforward plunge into deeply tragic events, the movie begins with middle-aged couple Michael (the ever-reliable Lior Ashkenazi) and Daphna (Sarah Adler, in a fiery turn) being visited by »

- Eric Kohn

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Venice Film Review: ‘Foxtrot’

1 September 2017 7:52 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Lebanon” director Samuel Maoz went in a risky direction by making a film as different and daring as “Foxtrot,” and his boldness pays off in ways that make one reach for superlatives. Not content to merely confront the unspeakable grief of parents who lose a child, Maoz uses the film’s tripartite structure to encompass a devastating litany of Israeli attributes that run the gamut from machismo to racism to a past subverted by the Holocaust and then back again to grief. Just as no novel can tackle a mother’s fear of learning her soldier son is dead without being compared to David Grossman’s stunning “To the End of the Land,” so no film will be able to deal with a similar subject without being weighed against “Foxtrot.” Brilliantly constructed with a visual audacity that serves the subject rather than the other way around, this is award-winning filmmaking on a fearless level.

Each »

- Jay Weissberg

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First Trailer for Israeli Film 'Foxtrot' Playing Venice, Telluride, Toronto

31 August 2017 7:24 AM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

A short teaser trailer has debuted for the new film from Israeli director Samuel Maoz, titled Foxtrot. This film is premiering at the Venice Film Festival (tomorrow) and is also playing at the Telluride and Toronto Film Festivals, meaning it is definitely something impressive and the buzz will start to hit hard right away. Maoz is the director who made the fantastic entirely-inside-a-tank film Lebanon a few years ago, and this is his latest feature. Foxtrot is about a family who must face the facts when their son is killed at a desolate military outpost. Starring Lior Ashkenazi and Sarah Adler. Even though there's not much this will give you a good idea of what's going on. So far so good, I'm looking forward to seeing it in Venice. Watch below. Here's the first festival trailer (+ poster) for Samuel Maoz's Foxtrot, direct from Tiff's YouTube: And here's another full »

- Alex Billington

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The Match Factory launches Samuel Maoz’s 'Foxtrot'

16 August 2017 4:41 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Venice and Toronto berths for Golden Lion winner’s drama.

The Match Factory will launch sales in earnest this autumn on Samuel Maoz’s Venice and Toronto drama Foxtrot, the writer-director’s anticipated follow-up to his 2009 narrative debut Lebanon, which won Venice’s Golden Lion and four Israeli Academy awards.

In Foxtrot, Michael and Dafna are devastated when army officials show up at their home to announce the death of their son Jonathan.

Michael becomes increasingly frustrated by overzealous mourning relatives and well-meaning army bureaucrats.

While his sedated wife rests, Michael spirals into a whirlwind of anger only to experience one of life’s unfathomable twists which rival the surreal military experiences of his son.

Footnote and Big Bad Wolves star Lior Ashkenazi leads cast alongside The Cakemaker and Notre Musique actress Sarah Adler.

The Israeli title, which has already drawn unannounced buyers, will get its world premiere in competition on the Lido before heading to Toronto »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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News of a death by Anne-Katrin Titze

30 July 2017 3:54 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Lior Ashkenazi with Anne-Katrin Titze on his role in Samuel Maoz's Foxtrot: "I had to take it to the edge of my skills, of my emotions." Photo: Whitby Hotel

Alexander Payne's Downsizing, starring Matt Damon with Kristen Wiig, Laura Dern, Neil Patrick Harris, Christoph Waltz, Jason Sudeikis, Udo Kier, and Margo Martindale will open the 74th Venice International Film Festival. Three other world premières include Human Capital director Paolo Virzi's The Leisure Seeker (Helen Mirren, Donald Sutherland); 45 Years director Andrew Haigh's Lean On Pete (Chloë Sevigny, Travis Fimmel, Steve Buscemi); and Lebanon (Golden Lion winner in 2009) director Samuel Maoz's Foxtrot, starring Sarah Adler and Lior Ashkenazi (Joseph Cedar's Norman: The Moderate Rise And Tragic Fall Of A New York Fixer).

Lior Ashkenazi's upcoming films José Padilha's Entebbe with Rosamund Pike and Daniel Brühl, and Julie Delpy's My Zoe with Gemma Arterton, »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Norman review: Dir. Joseph Cedar (2017)

9 June 2017 6:52 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Norman review: Richard Gere leads the cast of this memorable drama from writer director Joseph Cedar.

Who’s the elderly chap in spectacles and a cloth cap? You may be surprised to learn this is intellectual heart throb Richard Gere, who takes arguably the role of a lifetime in new drama Norman (elaborate subtitle: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer). Gere is finally showing his age in an intriguing story of business and politics that feels like a true story, even though it’s the brainchild of writer/director Joseph Cedar.

Norman Oppenheimer (a character reportedly inspired by events in Nazi propaganda film The Jew Suess) is a veteran consultant, a mover and shaker who conjures up his own work day to day through sheer instinct and tenacity. When he ingratiates himself with Israeli politician Micha Eshel (Lior Ashkenazi) in pursuit of a deal an unlikely friendship develops. »

- Steve Palace

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Norman Review

8 June 2017 12:28 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Stefan Pape

 

Quietly, Richard Gere is consistently making rather good movies, telling interesting stories and taking on nuanced, intriguing roles. From The Benefactor to Arbitrage (let’s just forget The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel for now) – he’s tackling intimate character studies, and his latest, Joseph Cedar’s Norman, is no different.

Gere plays the eponymous protagonist, a professional chancer and over-enthused fixer – only problem is, nobody will actually let him get close enough to fix anything. Until he meets Eshel (Lior Ashkenazi), an Israeli politician spending some time in New York, touched by Norman’s offer to buy him a pair of shoes. Three years pass, and Eshel is now an influential world leader, as the Prime Minister of his native country, and when he returns to the States to meet the President, Norman shows up at a function – and they remember each other well. To have »

- Stefan Pape

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Movie Review – Norman (2016)

7 June 2017 1:20 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Norman, 2016.

Directed by Joseph Cedar.

Starring Richard Gere, Lior Ashkenazi, Michael Sheen, Dan Stevens, Steve Buscemi, and Charlotte Gainsbourg.

Synopsis:

From the outside, Norman Oppenheim (Richard Gere) looks like an eccentric businessman.  But the truth is that he dreams up schemes that come to nothing, so he tries to be everybody’s friend, and doesn’t succeed at that either.  Until he strikes up an unexpected friendship with an Israeli politician, one that brings him the attention and respect he craves.  And one that encourages him to broker a series of deals that eventually start a political crisis ……

Let’s give the film its full title – Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer.  It’s no surprise that the distributors went for the one word title, but the longer version gives you a better idea of what the film is about.  Sort of.  Because the »

- Freda Cooper

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Exclusive clip from ‘Norman’, starring Richard Gere – in cinemas Friday

6 June 2017 10:13 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

In cinemas this week is the new Richard Gere film Norman. The film revolves around a small time operator who befriends a young politician at a low point in his life. Three years later, when the politician becomes an influential world leader, Norman’s life dramatically changes for better and worse. To celebrate the release, we have a brand new, exclusive clip from the film to share with you ahead of its debut in UK cinemas on Friday.

Norman Oppenheimer (Richard Gere) lives a lonely life in the margins of New York City power and money, a would-be operator dreaming up financial schemes that never come to fruition. As he has nothing real to offer, Norman strives to be everyone’s friend, but his incessant networking leads him nowhere.

Always on the lookout for someone willing to pay attention to him, Norman sets his sights on Micha Eshel (Lior Ashkenazi »

- Paul Heath

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Watch an exclusive clip from Norman starring Richard Gere

5 June 2017 2:59 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Ahead of its UK release this Friday (June 9th), we’ve got an exclusive clip from Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer, the new drama from director Joseph Cedar (Footnote) and starring Richard Gere. Take a look at the clip below, or check it out over on our YouTube channel…

Norman Oppenheimer (Richard Gere) lives a lonely life in the margins of New York City power and money, a would-be operator dreaming up financial schemes that never come to fruition. As he has nothing real to offer, Norman strives to be everyone’s friend, but his incessant networking leads him nowhere. Always on the lookout for someone willing to pay attention to him, Norman sets his sights on Micha Eshel (Lior Ashkenazi), a charismatic Israeli politician alone in New York at a low point in his career. Sensing Eshel’s vulnerability, Norman reaches out »

- Gary Collinson

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Bo Report: 'Pirates of the Caribbean 5' rules although well down on predecessor

28 May 2017 9:21 PM, PDT | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales..

The fifth edition of the Disney, Jerry Bruckheimer and Johnny Depp Pirates of the Caribbean franchise easily topped the Aussie box office last weekend although the debut was well below the previous installment.

Directed by Joachim Rønning and Espen Sandberg and shot in Queensland after an injection of $21.6 million in funding from the federal government plus state government incentives, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales captured $5.9 million on 292 locations, according to ComScore.

That.s 41 per cent below the $9.9 million debut of Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides in 2011. The latter finished up earning $27.2 million, which may be out of reach of the new film.

Pirates 5 scored an estimated $US77 million over the four-day Memorial Day holiday in the Us and $208 million internationally for a global total of $285 million, so the studio may be hard-pressed to recoup the reported $230 million budget. »

- Don Groves

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‘Big Bad Wolves’ Directors Set For Epic ‘Once Upon a Time in Palestine’ (Exclusive)

18 May 2017 10:21 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Israel’s Aharon Keshales and Navot Papushado, whose “Big Bad Wolves” became a 2013 festival sensation, winning the endorsement of Quentin Tarantino, have set their follow-up: “Once Upon a Time in Palestine.”

Written by Keshales, Papushado and Ehud Lavski (“Things I Saw Before I Went Blind”), the genre-bending thriller “Once Upon a Time” is set in 1946 Palestine still under a British rule whose authorities determine to execute five members of Irgun, the Israeli para-military freedom fighters. Keen on earning their spurs as future members of the resistance, three teenagers decide to kidnap two British soldiers and use them as leverage.

Producers Avraham Pirchi, Chilik Michaeli and Lilach Sonin from Israeli production company United Channels Movies (Ucm), which produced “Big Bad Wolves” and “Matter of Size,” will present the new project to Cannes’ financiers.

“Once Upon a Time in Palestine” is an “at times funny and at times nerve-wracking portrayal of Israel’s birth of a nation, »

- John Hopewell

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Giveaway – Win A Poster From Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer Signed By Richard Gere And Director Joseph Cedar

15 May 2017 11:32 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Wamg is giving away to one lucky reader a poster from the new film Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer signed by Richard Gere & director Joseph Cedar.

Norman Oppenheimer (Richard Gere) lives a lonely life in the margins of New York City power and money, a would-be operator dreaming up financial schemes that never come to fruition. As he has nothing real to offer, Norman strives to be everyone’s friend, but his incessant networking leads him nowhere.

Always on the lookout for someone willing to pay attention to him, Norman sets his sights on Micha Eshel (Lior Ashkenazi), a charismatic Israeli politician alone in New York at a low point in his career. Sensing Eshel’s vulnerability, Norman reaches out with a gift of a very expensive pair of shoes, a gesture that deeply touches Eshel. When Eshel becomes Prime Minister three years later, »

- Movie Geeks

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

1-20 of 37 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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