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Richard Arlen Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (5) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (3) | Trivia (3)

Overview (5)

Date of Birth 1 September 1899St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
Date of Death 28 March 1976North Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, USA  (emphysema)
Birth NameSylvanus Richard Van Mattimore
Nickname Dick
Height 5' 11½" (1.82 m)

Mini Bio (1)

During World War I, Richard Arlen served in the Royal Canadian Flying Corps as a pilot, but he never saw combat. After the war he drifted round and eventually wound up in Los Angeles, where he got a job as a motorcycle messenger at a film laboratory. When he crashed into the gates of Paramount Pictures and suffered a broken leg, the studio provided prompt medical attention. Impressed by his good looks, executives also gave him a contract after he had recovered. Starting as an extra in 1925, Arlen soon rose to credited roles, but the quality of his work left much to be desired. However, this was the silent era, which was more about looks than substance, and he continued on. His big break came when William A. Wellman cast him as a pilot in the silent film Wings (1927) with Charles 'Buddy' Rogers and Clara Bow. The story of fighter aces would win the Oscar for Best Picture and Arlen would continue to play the tough, cynical hero throughout his career. Arlen appeared in three more pictures directed by Wellman, Beggars of Life (1928), Ladies of the Mob (1928) and The Man I Love (1929). In "Wings" he had a scene with a young actor named Gary Cooper. In 1929, he again worked with Cooper in the western The Virginian (1929), only this time Cooper was the star and Arlen was the supporting actor. While Arlen moved easily into sound, his career just bumped along. By 1935 he was working in such "B" pictures as Three Live Ghosts (1936). It was in 1935 that he became a freelance actor and his freelance career soon waned. In 1939, he signed with Universal and began working in its action films. In 1941 he moved to the Pine-Thomas unit at Paramount, where he appeared in adventure films. With the war on, most of his earlier films included war scenarios. By the end of the 1940s Arlen was becoming deaf and this seemed to signal the end of his career. However, he had an operation in 1949 that restored his hearing and he went on making a handful of adventures and westerns through the 1950s and working more in the 1960s. He made 15 westerns for producer A.C. Lyles, who worked with the old western stars.

Besides movies, Arlen also appeared on television and in commercials. After leaving the business in the late 1960s, he was coaxed back to the screen for three small roles in films that were released the same year that he died.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Tony Fontana <tony.fontana@spacebbs.com>

Spouse (3)

Margaret Kinsella (1946 - 28 March 1976) (his death)
Jobyna Ralston (28 January 1927 - 4 September 1945) (divorced) (1 child)
Ruth Austin (1920? - 1923) (divorced) (1 child)

Trivia (3)

Father of actor Richard Arlen Jr.
During World War I he served as a fighter pilot with the Royal Flying Corps.
Made quite a few pictures for producers William H. Pine and William C. Thomas, known as "The Dollar Bills" because none of their films ever lost money. Part of the reason Arlen may have made so many for the pair was that he was also a major stockholder in their production company, Pine-Thomas Productions.

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