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200 Greatest Horror Films (160-151)

Special Mention: Battle Royale

Written and directed by Kinji Fukasaku

Japan, 2000

The concept of The Hunger Games owes much to Koushun Takami’s cult novel Battle Royale, adapted for the cinema in 2000 by Kinji Fukasaku. The film is set in a dystopian alternate-universe, in Japan, with the nation utterly collapsed, leaving 15 percent unemployed and 800,000 students boycotting school. The government passes something called the Millennium Educational Reform Act, which apparently provides for a class of ninth-graders to be chosen each year and pitted against one another on a remote island for 3 days. Each student is given a bag with a randomly selected weapon and a few rations of food and water, and sent off to kill each other in a no-holds-barred fight to the death. With 48 contestants, only one will go home alive. Yes, this has been often cited as the original Hunger Games; whether or not Suzanne Collins borrowed heavily
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Fantasia Film Festival Review: Possessed

One of the many lovable elements of 2012’s Paranorman was how easy it was for genre fans to latch onto. It dipped its toes into the horror genre, giving small homage-filled shout outs to films that horror lovers adore. While that film and those nods were fun, it left me wondering if we’d ever receive an animated or claymation filled horror film. That’s where director Sam Ortí Martí’s Possessed comes in. Firing on all cylinders and never stopping for a single second, the stop-motion film is nothing short of a genuinely sadistic love letter to the horror genre and the films that inhabit that genre.

Throwing elements of over a dozen classics films into one stop-motion feast, Possessed gives its viewers The Exorcist, Evil Dead, The Omen and an incredibly impressive amount of others into one film, telling the story of a former superstar trying to raise
See full article at Icons of Fright »

Annecy: ‘Possessed’s’ Sam Developing ‘Vertigo’s Shadow’ (Exclusive)

Indie toon helmer Sam, whose out-there “Possessed” plays in competition at this week’s Annecy Animation Festival, is prepping ”Vertigo’s Shadow,” a musical mixing live action and animation.

Sam’s sophomore feature outing, “Shadow” will be produced through the helmer’s imprint Conflictivos Productions. Sam is seeking co-production partners in Mexico and Belgium.

“My central idea is to have a real character in a stop-motion world. I want a realistic look in a fantastic environment. It will turn on a man confronting a world that he doesn’t understand,” Sam told Variety.

“Vertigo’s Shadow” will be a black comedy musical with “Jesus Christ Superstar” as a main reference. Movie will also channel Terry Gilliam’s Kafka-esque “Brazil,” he added.

Santiago Segura, helmer and star of the “Torrente” saga, Spain’s most successful film franchise, has announced his support for Sam’ second feature.

“Santiago is a great actor and an excellent singer.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

FilmSharks touts animation Possessed

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: FilmSharks International has come on to sell worldwide rights to the stop-motion feature Possessed (Pos Eso) from former Aardman Animations animator Sam.

Guido Rud will tout the Spanish-language feature and is preparing an English-language version of the film that recently earned a jury special mention at Sitges.

Possessed centres on a celebrated flamenco dancer who seeks the help of a defrocked priest to solve her son’s demented behaviour after his father dies in a freak accident.

On the eve of the market Rud said talks were ongoing with Us distributors and cast for the English version.

The Spanish voice cast features Santiago Segura from Spain’s smash Torrente franchise, as well as Alex Angulo, Anabel Alonso and Carlos Areces.

“When you see kids loving ParaNormam or Hotel Transylvania more and more you will understand why buyers rush to get this gem that makes you travel from Indiana Jones to The Exorcist to Gremlins, Taxi Driver, ParaNorman
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Tla Releasing Takes ‘Hidden Away’ for the U.S. (Exclusive)

Tla Releasing has bought all U.S. distribution rights to Spanish helmer Mikel Rueda’s coming-of-age gay drama “Hidden Away,” sold by Paris-based Wide Management.

The U.S. deal culminates an upbeat performance by “Hidden Away” in international markets, which in recent months has seen Wide selling the pic in key European territories such as France, (Outplay Films), U.K. and Ireland (Matchbox Films) and Germany and Austria (Salzgeber).

Toplining Adil Koukouh (“El Principe”), debutant German Alcarazu, Ana Wagener (“Biutiful”) and the late Alex Angulo (“Pan’s Labyrinth”), “Hidden” is set in the northern Spanish city of Bilbao. It tells the story of the gay relationship between a 14-year-old Spaniard and a young immigrant Moroccan boy who runs away to avoid his imminent deportation.

“’Hidden Away’ is not just a film about or for the gay community. It is a film that portrays universal themes such as coming-of-age and what
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Remembering James Garner, Elaine Stritch and Other Reel-Important People We Lost in July

  • Movies.com
Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies who have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Alex Angulo (1953-2014) - Spanish Actor. He is best known here for playing the doctor in Guillermo del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth (see below). His other movies include the 2006 Gary Oldman starrer The Backwoods, Pedro Almodovar's Live Flesh and Alex de la Iglesia's The Day of the Beast, Accion Mutante and Dying of Laughter. He died in a car accident on July 20. (El Pais) Paul Apted (1967-2014) - Sound Editor. He worked on the...

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Spanish Actor Alex Angulo Dead At 61

I hope someone in Madrid is dimming the lights on the Schweppes sign; that would be a fitting tribute to one of its best actors. Álex Angulo, star of films such as The Day of the Beast, Live Flesh, and Pan's Labyrinth, has died in a traffic accident in his native Spain. Likely best known to film audiences through his work with Álex de la Iglesia, this is a tremendous loss for Spanish cinema.Born in the Basque country, Angulo got his start in local theatre before moving to film in 1981 with Escape to Segovia (directed by Imanol Uribe). But it was his film with de la Iglesia that brought him to greater prominence. First, as one half of conjoined twins in Mutant Action, who...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

25 Days of Christmas: ‘Day of the Beast’ – Delirious, demented and diabolically funny

El día de la bestia (The Day of the Beast)

Directed by Álex de la Iglesia

Written by Jorge Guerricaechevarría and Álex de la Iglesia

Spain, 1995

Considered one of Spain’s hottest directors in the late 1990s, Alex de la Iglesia hasn’t slowed down one bit over time. He’s continuously directed genre-bending, imaginative films, laced with black humour and often sharp satire for over two decades. His tongue-in-cheek sci-fi thriller The Day of the Beast won no fewer than six of the Oscar equivalent, the Goyas. Best described as a comic precursor to End of Days, The Day of the Beast follows a Catholic priest and professor of theology (Alex Angulo) who tries to thwart the coming of Satan on Christmas Eve. In a rather slapdash manner, he befriends a metalhead record store clerk (Santiago Segura) and the host of a paranormal-themed TV talk show (Armando DeRazza) to help him on his quest.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

31 Days of Horror: 100 Greatest Horror Films: Top 100

Every year, we here at Sound On Sight celebrate the month of October with 31 Days of Horror; and every year, I update the list of my favourite horror films ever made. Last year, I released a list that included 150 picks. This year, I’ll be upgrading the list, making minor alterations, changing the rankings, adding new entries, and possibly removing a few titles. I’ve also decided to publish each post backwards this time for one reason: the new additions appear lower on my list, whereas my top 50 haven’t changed much, except for maybe in ranking. I am including documentaries, short films and mini series, only as special mentions – along with a few features that can qualify as horror, but barely do.

Come Back Tonight To See My List Of The 200 Best!

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Special Mention:

Wait until Dark

Directed by Terence Young

Written by Robert Carrington

USA, 1967

Directed by Terence Young,
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Tiff’s 25 Years of Midnight Madness: Best of the Fest #6 –’Day of the Beast’

El día de la bestia (The Day of the Beast)

Directed by Álex de la Iglesia

Written by Jorge Guerricaechevarría and Álex de la Iglesia

Spain, 1995

Considered one of Spain’s hottest directors in the late ’90s, Alex de la Iglesia hasn’t slowed down one bit over time. He’s continuously directed genre-bending, imaginative films, laced with black humour and often sharp satire for over two decades. His tongue-in-cheek 1995 sci-fi/thriller The Day of the Beast, won no fewer than six of its Oscar equivalent, the Goyas. Best described as a comic precursor to End of Days, The Day of the Beast follows a Catholic priest and professor of theology (Alex Angulo) who tries to thwart the coming of Satan on Christmas Eve. In a rather slapdash manner he befriends a metalhead record store clerk (Santiago Segura) and the host of a paranormal-themed TV talk show (Armando DeRazza) to help him on his quest.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Pan's Labyrinth Review d: Guillermo del Toro

El Laberinto Del Fauno / Pan's Labyrinth (2006) Direction and screenplay: Guillermo del Toro Cast: Ivana Baquero, Sergi López, Maribel Verdú, Doug Jones, Ariadna Gil, Álex Angulo, Manolo Solo Oscar Movies Recommended Ivana Baquero, Pan's Labyrinth "If you expect to get laid after this screening," Guillermo del Toro told the midnight (actually, closer to 1 a.m.) audience at the AFI Fest Los Angeles 2007 premiere of Pan's Labyrinth, "it ain't gonna happen." Indeed, del Toro's "adult fairytale" is hardly the sort of fable that would induce either sexual or romantic yearnings. The story of a young girl who attempts to escape the brutal repression of General Francisco Franco's Spain by creating her own dark fantasy world, Pan's Labyrinth is movie magic at its most visceral. [Note: Spoilers ahead.] Set in 1944 Spain, where isolated groups of rebels were still fighting Franco's totalitarian right-wing government, Pan's Labyrinth starts with a prologue about a [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Films of the Decade Results: Voted by You

  • HeyUGuys
So, it’s been a busy month with votes coming in by the thousand but now that New Years Day has arrived we’ve been able to collate all your votes to give you the definitive list of movies that you believe defined the decade.

I’ll be looking at the top 10 in more depth below but you can download the entire list of movies by opening this Pdf. So, read on to find out which movies you believe most defined the decade.

Let us know your thoughts on the top 10 in the comments below. One question I have: If Avatar has come out earlier in the decade, would it have made your top 10 films of the past 10 years? Personally it would make it into my top 10 of 2009. Possibly even be number one.

10. There Will Be Blood (2007)

Director: Paul Thomas Anderson Cast: Daniel Day-Lewis / Mary Elizabeth Barrett / Paul Dano / Dillon Freasier
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Pan's Labyrinth

Pan's Labyrinth (El Laberinto del Fauno) is set in northern Spain in 1944, after the victory of Franco and his fascists. The film revolves around Ofelia, a young girl whose father is dead and mother has re-married. Her new husband is a vindictive fascist army captain. The captain believes that a son should be born near his father and so has his pregnant wife and stepdaughter Ofelia are sent for to join him in northern Spain, where he and his men are locked in a tit for tat battle with anti-fascist rebels. The lonely Ofelia, whose only real escape, is into the fairytales she reads, appears to create a fantasy world for herself. As a way to deal with her environment, though soon the border between fantasy and realty becomes blurred, and young Ofelia finds both reality and fantasy can quickly turn into a nightmare.

Pan's Labyrinth is directed by the much admired Guillermo del Toro,
See full article at LateFilmFull »

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