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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998

1-20 of 38 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Troy Gentry’s Helicopter Called for Help After Experiencing Mechanical Problems Prior to Crash

11 September 2017 10:40 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The helicopter that crashed in Medford, New Jersey, killing country music star Troy Gentry and the vehicle’s pilot, James Evan Robinson, called for help after experiencing mechanical problems on Friday.

In emergency dispatch audio obtained by TMZ, responders said the the aircraft had been hovering for several minutes waiting for the fire department to arrive before attempting an emergency landing.

The helicopter crashed before responders arrived.

The 50-year-old country star was scheduled to perform with bandmate Eddie Montgomery at the Flying W Airport and Resort in Medford on Friday evening, and the concert was canceled immediately.

“It is with »

- Stephanie Petit

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Airport Officials Detail Moments Before Troy Gentry’s Death: ‘The Day Started with Such Excitement’

11 September 2017 8:49 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The airport and concert venue where Montgomery Gentry’s Troy Gentry was killed in a helicopter crash on Friday afternoon is speaking out about the tragedy.

The 50-year-old country star was scheduled to perform with bandmate Eddie Montgomery at the Flying W Airport and Resort in Medford on Friday evening, and the concert was canceled immediately.

“The day started with such excitement as the Montgomery Gentry bus rolled through our gates. The nicest people got off the bus and joined us on the ramp for what we hoped would be the best concert we have ever had. Sadly this was not to be, »

- Stephanie Petit

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Troy Gentry Was Life of the Party Onstage Days Before Death: ‘Whatever Adventure, He Was Up for It,’ Says Friend

8 September 2017 4:55 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

As tributes pour in for Troy Gentry following his tragic death in a helicopter crash, one friend is remembering the Montgomery Gentry singer’s powerful presence both on and off the stage.

“Nobody loved life more than Troy Gentry,” music journalist and author Holly Gleason tells People exclusively. “Whatever adventure, all night party or hardcore hillbilly song, he was up for it.”

Gleason, who did publicity for Gentry and bandmate Eddie Montgomery in the early 2000s, last saw her friend Sunday during the band’s set at the Tequila Bay Country Music Festival in Miami.

“He was on that stage, »

- Brianne Tracy

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Apply Now for AFI’s Directing Workshop for Women

17 August 2017 9:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Dww Faculty Member Patty Jenkins on the set of “Wonder Woman:” Jenkins’ Twitter account

The continuous lack of female directors in Hollywood should come as no surprise. The numbers have, more or less, remained the same over the past 10 years. Slowly but surely, AFI’s Directing Workshop for Women (Dww) is trying to change that. Per its website, Dww is committed to “educating and mentoring female filmmakers to increase the number of [female] directors and showrunners.” This 43-year-old program is now on the lookout for its next class of upcoming women directors.

This year-long intensive program offers guided instruction on a short film or new media project. Dww is open to women with a minimum of three years’ experience, and up to eight projects are accepted each year. The program is tuition-free, but each participant must raise their own project funds.

Participants will receive roughly four months of mentorship with some of Dww’s distinguished faculty. Its list of mentors include, but is not limited to, Patty Jenkins (“Wonder Woman”), Kimberly Peirce (“Boys Don’t Cry”), Jill Soloway (“Transparent”), and Issa Rae (“Insecure”).

The workshop guides participants through the entire filmmaking process, from production to picture-lock to post-production. Projects then are screened in an annual Showcase attended by agents, managers, producers, and executives.

Dww alumnae include Maya Angelou, Anne Bancroft, and Ellen Burstyn.

Applications cost $125 and will be accepted until August 31. Visit AFI’s Dww page to apply for the workshop or to find out more.

Apply Now for AFI’s Directing Workshop for Women was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Kelsey Moore

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'Whose Streets?' Review: Portrait of Ferguson May Be the Doc of the Year

13 August 2017 8:52 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

You might think for a nanosecond that, after seeing footage of the protests and push-back in Ferguson, Missouri, played in TV-news loops during the back half of 2014, those images might have lost the ability to shock or stun you. And then you bear witness to the scenes of cacophony and chaos in Whose Streets?, the extraordinary documentary by Sabaah Folayan and Damon Davis – the tear gas and the tanks and bodies being slammed down on the ground – and your rage starts to play catch-up to the rage emanating from behind the camera. »

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J.K. Rowling Apologizes After Wrongfully Accusing Donald Trump Of Ignoring Boy In Wheelchair

31 July 2017 2:29 PM, PDT | ET Canada | See recent ET Canada news »

It’s no secret that J.K. Rowling doesn’t like U.S. President Donald Trump, and the “Harry Potter” author has taken to Twitter once again to express her disgust. After sharing a video of Trump appearing to ignore a little boy in a wheelchair, Rowling wrote a quote from Maya Angelou, “When someone shows you who they […] »

- Aynslee Darmon

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Interview, Audio: Cindy Caponera, TV Writer for ‘I’m Dying Up Here’

23 July 2017 5:56 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – One of the great new premium channel TV series, which piggybacked on the “Twin Peaks” return on the Showtime Network, is “I’m Dying Up Here.” Set in the 1970s, it tells the stories of fictional stand up comedians in Los Angeles, and one of the Consulting Producers and series writers is Cindy Caponera.

Ari Graynor as Cassie in ‘I’m Dying Up Here’

Photo credit: Showtime Network

Caponera wrote the latest episode, “Girls Are Funny, Too,” which focused on Cassie (Ari Graynor), as she tries to break new ground in an era where women in comedy had even more obstacles in a man’s show business world. The episode was loose, poignant and funny, and highlighted the excellent cast, which includes Oscar winner Melissa Leo as Goldie, the owner of the club that the stand up comics perform in. Add in Jake Lacy, Al Madrigal, Andrew Santino, Erik Griffin and Rj Cyler, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Biopic About Civil Rights Activist Fannie Lou Hamer Is in the Works

14 July 2017 11:31 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Fannie Lou Hamer at the 1964 Democratic National Convention: Library of Congress/Warren K. Leffler/Wikimedia Commons

Black women were and are a major force in the fight for civil rights, but it is still so rare for the Hollywood biopic machine to greenlight projects about activists like Anne Moody, Maya Angelou, Amelia Boynton, and Rosa Parks. “Remember the Titans” writer Gregory Allen Howard and the folks at 1492 Pictures have apparently been thinking the same thing themselves since, per Variety, they have put a film about civil rights pioneer Fannie Lou Hamer into development.

Born and raised in Mississippi, Hamer came from a family of sharecroppers. She began helping her family in the fields at age six and left school after the sixth grade to work full-time. As an adult, Hamer helped spearhead the 1962 Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. She was arrested on trumped up charges in 1963 and put in jail, where she was badly beaten and incurred permanent kidney damage.

Hamer made headlines when she spoke as the representative of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party at the 1964 Democratic National Convention. Arguing that the Democrats should recognize her party instead of Mississippi’s segregated Democratic party, Hamer recounted the acts of violence she witnessed while participating in the Civil Rights Movement.

“All of this [violence] is on account of we want to register, to become first-class citizens,” Hamer said. “And if the Freedom Democratic Party is not seated now, I question America. Is this America, the land of the free and the home of the brave, where we have to sleep with our telephones off the hooks because our lives be threatened daily, because we want to live as decent human beings, in America?”

Hamer died of breast cancer in 1977 at age 59.

1492’s Chris Columbus is producing the as-yet untitled Hamer biopic. He is joined by Howard, Jenny Blum, Michael Barnathan, and Mark Radcliffe. No word on the director or cast yet.

Howard also penned the script for the upcoming Harriet Tubman biopic, which he is producing as well. “Harriet” will see Broadway star and Tony winner Cynthia Erivo (“The Color Purple”) play the abolitionist and Underground Railroad conductor. Production on “Harriet” is expected to begin later this year.

Biopic About Civil Rights Activist Fannie Lou Hamer Is in the Works was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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Michael Buble Makes Emotional First Public Appearance Since Son Noah's Cancer Diagnosis

29 June 2017 10:46 AM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Michael Bublé is thankful for his family every day.

The 41-year-old singer accepted the National Arts Centre Award in Ottawa from the Governor General of Canada on Wednesday, his first public appearance since his 3-year-old son, Noah, was diagnosed with cancer last November. In his heartfelt speech, Bublé thanked his family, and got emotional when describing what they've been through these past few months.

"My entire life has been inspired by how my family has made me feel -- my wife, my children, my parents, my sisters," he said, after reading the Maya Angelou quote, "People will never forget how you made them feel." "There are no words to describe how I feel about you. Sometimes 'I love you' just isn't enough."

Watch: Michael Buble Says Son Noah is 'Progressing Well' During Cancer Treatment in Emotional Message to Fans

The National Arts Centre Award is presented each year "in recognition of recent exceptional work by a performing »

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Michael Bublé Makes Touching Speech During First Public Appearance Since Son Noah's Cancer Battle

29 June 2017 5:03 AM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

After months by his son Noah's side as he battled cancer, Michael Bublé stepped back into the spotlight for an uplifting moment.  The Grammy-winning father of two emerged in his native Canada on Wednesday to accept the National Arts Centre Award in Ottawa from the Governor General of Canada. Sporting a tailored black suit, the famous crooner was visibly moved as he was hailed as one of the "preeminent music artists of his generation" during the prestigious ceremony.  Soon, he took the podium to share personal remarks, beginning with a quote from Maya Angelou that concluded with, "People will never forget how you made them feel." "My entire life has been »

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Mindy Newell: Things In The Air And On The Air

26 June 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

…there’s only two episodes left this season—three, if you count the Christmas special—and there just seems to me to be an awful lot to be discovered yet.  I don’t want to think that Moffat is coasting his way to the end of his association with Doctor Who; he hasn’t yet disappointed me. I loved the denouement of last season, so I’m still crossing my fingers—but…

That’s from last week’s column, in which I bemoaned my disappointment in Doctor Who this season.  Then, on Saturday night, came the eleventh episode, “World Enough and Time.”

Wow!  And also Holy Cow!

I really, really don’t want to spoil it for anyone who hasn’t seen it yet, so do not expect any mention of the story.  I’m even struggling right now as to whether or not to include some of the dialogue… »

- Mindy Newell

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‘And Still I Rise’ Directors On Maya Angelou: “Whatever Story She Was Telling, She Was There”

15 June 2017 3:02 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Each with their own past experiences with Dr. Maya Angelou—the American poet, memoirist, and civil rights activist, most famous for her 1969 autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings—documentary filmmakers Bob Hercules and Rita Coburn Whack came together by chance on Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise, PBS’ American Masters doc about Angelou’s life and times. Both intended to pursue their own separate doc projects on Angelou, with the knowledge that no documentary had… »

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‘And Still I Rise’ Directors On Maya Angelou: “Whatever Story She Was Telling, She Was There”

15 June 2017 3:02 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Each with their own past experiences with Dr. Maya Angelou—the American poet, memoirist, and civil rights activist, most famous for her 1969 autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings—documentary filmmakers Bob Hercules and Rita Coburn Whack came together by chance on Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise, PBS’ American Masters doc about Angelou’s life and times. Both intended to pursue their own separate doc projects on Angelou, with the knowledge that no documentary had… »

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Laff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Sara Lamm — “Thank You For Coming”

15 June 2017 9:31 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Thank You For Coming

Sara Lamm is a writer, performer, and documentary filmmaker. Her most recent film, “Birth Story: Ina May Gaskin and the Farm Midwives,” co-directed with Mary Wigmore, won the Audience Award at the 2012 Los Angeles Film Festival. It was also released theatrically in the U.S. and screened in community venues all over the world. Her work has appeared at Mass-moca, The American Visionary Art Museum, and on NPR.

Thank You For Coming” will premiere at the 2017 La Film Festival on June 18.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Sl: As an adult, I found out that I was conceived via sperm donor. The news was shocking, and the phrase “anonymous donor” seemed to strongly imply that I was supposed to live with the mystery — only I found that I didn’t want to.

Thank You For Coming” is a kind of detective story documentary, an obstinate attempt to create a narrative out of something that seemed to defy knowing.

Also, my husband describes the film as a “funny story about loss,” which I take as a high compliment.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Sl: This may sound strange, but I wanted to change a feeling in my bones. I wanted to get rid of a certain kind of loneliness, an internal sense of being unmoored.

I felt like the only way I could do that was by embarking on and documenting an adventure.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Sl: So many people have shared stories with me about their own fathers since I began this project. It turns out that there are lots of ways to “not know” your dad. You may be donor conceived, or your father may have left. There could be family secrets, or your father may simply be unable to emotionally connect.

I hope that this film gives some space to think about that, particularly in relation to fathers and daughters. That’s an important line in the film, I think: “A father’s life affects the daughter’s; they are woven together.” I’m interested in people’s response to that idea.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Sl: Writing the narration was the hardest part. I kept putting it off.

Finally, I read something about how the great Maya Angelou used to rent a hotel room and do her writing there. So, I went to an inexpensive hotel near my house to hunker down. In my case, it was periodical: a few days at a time over several months.

This is something I highly recommend for people — mothers especially — who have some creative work to do but can’t seem to find that wide-open quiet time in which to do it.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Sl: This movie is the opposite of a studio film. It’s about as homemade as it can get, cobbled together with equipment, talent, and dollars from home.

The mics are dusty ol’ things from the drawer under my desk. The cinematographers included myself and anyone else who happened to be handed the camera. The editor and I worked in the living room most days from ten to three, which is when my kids get home from school.

I think it’s important to talk about this kind of filmmaking — particularly as it pertains to people who are, in addition to moviemaking, also part of a familial eco-system.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at the Laff?

Sl: I love Laff so much for the fantastic and diverse array of films they program, and also for how well they treat the filmmakers.

I am excited and honored to be a part of this year’s festival. Plus, it’s so fun to screen in my hometown.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Sl: A filmmaker I respect a lot once laid it out for me. He said, “One way to make a film is when everything is perfect, and you know what you’re doing all the time. Another way involves chaos, and everything feels like it’s careening out of control. But, there’s a third way, and that’s somewhere in the middle. Get it as right as you can in terms of prep, structure, financial and production support, and then just go make the damn thing.”

This was the most freeing advice, and it gave me permission to get started. I don’t know if I ever would have made a movie without those words.

The worst advice I ever got was, “Don’t apply to that women’s film festival.” Women’s film festivals are the best.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Sl: Just keep going.

Note: This is also advice for myself.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Sl: I love Amalie Rothschild’s “Nana, Mom and Me.”

Margaret Mead described the film in the best way: “A very simple but moving account of three generations of women, held together by recorded narrative and an emotion so intense that sophisticated audiences become still and contemplative as they watch it.”

For me, it was the first time that I ever saw — in film — a deep exploration of the ambivalence an artist might feel about her role as a parent. When I finally saw this film in 2012, I was both moved and furious that I had never heard of it before. It really drove home the fact that even though women have been making films for a long time, they aren’t properly passed from generation to generation the way they should be.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Sl: I am so proud of my women director friends, and I’m so grateful for the infrastructures that have been created to support them.

I can’t help but think that change is inevitable when I read awesome speeches like Jill Soloway’s. As a documentary filmmaker, I’m not on a set the same way she is, but I loved when she said that not being able to cry on set is a liability. I‘m gonna make a cross stitch of it and give it to some pals for Christmas.

Laff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Sara Lamm — “Thank You For Coming” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Kelsey Moore

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Oprah Winfrey, Ava DuVernay Pay Tribute to Each Other at Produced By Conference

10 June 2017 7:22 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Two of Hollywood’s leading cultural icons — Oprah Winfrey and Ava DuVernay — offered an upbeat glimpse Saturday at the origins of what’s to become an extensive collaboration.

Winfrey told a capacity crowd at the Zanuck Theater on the Fox lot that David Oyelowo had insisted that she look at DuVernay’s 2012 drama “The Middle of Nowhere,” which won the top prize at that year’s Sundance Film Festival. This then led to a Mother’s Day lunch at Winfrey’s home, where DuVernay brought in the biggest flower arrangement she could find leading Winfrey to agree to come on board as a producer and cast member on DuVernay’s “Selma.”

Winfrey told the crowd at the Producer Guild of America’s Produced By conference that she was moved by DuVernay’s behavior on the set, where it was often over 100 degrees.

“People treat me pretty well, so what I »

- Dave McNary

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Exclusive: Oprah Winfrey Gushes Over 'Visionary' Bff Ava DuVernay & Dishes on Gifts for the Clooney Twins!

6 June 2017 9:35 PM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Oprah Winfrey and Ava DuVernay are opening up about their friendship and on-set relationship while working on their drama series, Queen Sugar.

"I am so proud of this woman. I could start crying right now, but I’m not. I refuse to cry on Entertainment Tonight," Winfrey told Et's Nancy O'Dell when she joined DuVernay at a press junket promoting the upcoming second season of their acclaimed Own series.

"I am so proud of her and I trust her so much. So our ability to create Queen Sugar and then her growing into this powerful, Oscar-nominated, amazing visionary director is just [amazing]. I am just so happy and proud to be alive to see it."

Watch: Oprah and Ava DuVernay Attempting 'Something That's Never Been Done Before' With 'Queen Sugar'

DuVernay -- who created Queen Sugar, directed the first two episodes, and executive produces the show alongside Winfrey -- was nominated for an Academy Award this year for »

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Carol Burnett, Marshall Herskovitz, Edward Zwick to Receive AFI Honorary Doctorates

16 May 2017 12:00 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The American Film Institute will confer honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts degrees on Carol Burnett, Marshall Herskovitz, and Edward Zwick at its commencement ceremony on June 5 at the Tcl Chinese Theatre.

Herskovitz and Zwick are graduates of the AFI Class of 1975. The date of AFI’s commencement exercises marks the 50th anniversary of the American Film Institute’s formation in 1967. AFI noted Tuesday that 2017 also marks the 50th anniversary of “The Carol Burnett Show.”

Past recipients include Robert Altman, Maya Angelou, Saul Bass, Kathryn Bigelow, Mel Brooks, Anne V. Coates, Clint Eastwood, Roger Ebert, Nora Ephron, James Earl Jones, Lawrence Kasdan, Jeffrey Katzenberg, Kathleen Kennedy, Angela Lansbury, John Lasseter, Spike Lee, David Lynch, Helen Mirren, Rita Moreno, Quentin Tarantino, Robert Towne, Cicely Tyson, Haskell Wexler, and John Williams.

Burnett has received six Emmy Awards, five Golden Globe Awards and the 2016 Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award.

Herskovitz won four Primetime Emmy Awards. »

- Dave McNary

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Serena Williams Slams Tennis Player For Making Racist Comments About Her Baby

25 April 2017 8:08 AM, PDT | Popsugar.com | See recent Popsugar news »

Right now should be pure bliss for Serena Williams. Not only is she the best tennis player in the world (Nbd) and enjoying a lavish vacation with fiancé Alexis Ohanian, but she's also pregnant with her first child. Unfortunately, because the world is garbage, she was forced to address a racist comment made about her baby by a fellow tennis player via Instagram on Monday: It disappoints me to know we live in a society where people like Ilie Nastase can make such racist comments towards myself and unborn child, and sexist comments against my peers. I have said it once and I'll say it again, this world has come so far but yet we have so much further to go. Yes, we have broken down so many barriers- however there are a plethora more to go. This or anything else will not stop me from pouring love, light and »

- Quinn Keaney

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Power of Women New York Honorees Dig Deep for Worthy Causes

21 April 2017 2:20 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Audra McDonald captured the spirit at Variety’s fourth annual Power of Women New York luncheon when she told the crowd: “This feels like good church.”

McDonald was honored along with Jessica Chastain, Chelsea Clinton, Blake Lively, Gayle King, and Shari Redstone for their efforts on behalf of a range of philanthropic causes. The Friday afternoon event at Cipriani 42nd Street also honored Tina Knowles Lawson with the Community Commerce Impact Award.

Chastain was honored for her work with Planned Parenthood, an organization that she relied on for birth control services before she became a big-screen star. Access to affordable reproductive health care “makes it possible for a woman to have the equal opportunity of her male counterparts of having jurisdiction over her body, her life and her health,” she said.

Former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson got a big round of applause for her courage in pursuing a sexual harassment lawsuit that led to the ouster »

- Cynthia Littleton

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Power of Women New York Honorees Dig Deep for Worthy Causes

21 April 2017 2:20 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Audra McDonald captured the spirit at Variety’s fourth annual Power of Women New York luncheon when she told the crowd: “This feels like good church.”

McDonald was honored along with Jessica Chastain, Chelsea Clinton, Blake Lively, Gayle King, and Shari Redstone for their efforts on behalf of a range of philanthropic causes. The Friday afternoon event at Cipriani 42nd Street also honored Tina Knowles Lawson with the Community Commerce Impact Award.

Chastain was honored for her work with Planned Parenthood, an organization that she relied on for birth control services before she became a big-screen star. Access to affordable reproductive health care “makes it possible for a woman to have the equal opportunity of her male counterparts of having jurisdiction over her body, her life and her health,” she said.

Former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson got a big round of applause for her courage in pursuing a sexual »

- Cynthia Littleton

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998

1-20 of 38 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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