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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001 | 1998

1-20 of 114 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


The Wild and Wacky Set Designs of Wes Anderson

20 April 2017 2:01 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

A before-and-after look at the director’s meticulous productions.

The cinematic worlds of Wes Anderson are rich with minute detail and innovative design, they’re like life-sized playsets for adults, and they lend to his films not only a unique visual distinction, but also a lighthearted theatricality. Anderson doesn’t just direct his films, he crafts them from the ground up, starting with meticulous illustrations that he then hands over to set designers to realize in three dimensions.

In the latest comparative montage from Candice Drouet, Anderson’s set design finds itself in the spotlight. Drouet has paired pictures from Anderson’s various productions with screencaps of the final results, allowing you to appreciate just how much work goes into making the director’s seamless, fluid, and uniquely quirky worlds. In a cinematic landscape that’s largely computer generated, it’s refreshing to see the practical lengths to which Anderson and crew will go to in order »

- H. Perry Horton

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Wes Anderson’s Manly Men

20 April 2017 10:51 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

In search of male desire in a twee world.

Here’s a thesis: with the singular exception of his animated adventure story, Fantastic Mr. Fox, the movies of Wes Anderson are fundamentally about nice, fiery desire. But while a number of his movies explore this through the conventional terrain of the heterosexual relationship and its discontents — The Royal Tenenbaums and Moonrise Kingdom come to mind — others explore more curious expressions of desire, leaving Anderson’s plain and plaintive ladies behind. Shared aesthetic characteristics, from the constantly reprised Cornell boxes to the carefully referenced dead Eastern European novelists, are subject of much ruthless discussion among Anderson acolytes. And, considering Anderson’s diligent cooperation with turning a collection of essays and interviews into a $35 coffee table book, that seems to be the dissection that Anderson embraces. But what are those other, male-centric movies actually about? Most critics, when forced to give something like a serious and meaningful answer, will »

- Andrew Karpan

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Max Winkler Talks ‘Flower,’ Firecracker Star Zoey Deutch, Realist Influences & More [Tribeca Film Festival]

19 April 2017 9:35 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Thirty-three-year-old filmmaker Max Winkler has practically lived a mini-filmmaking career over the last 10 years. While he released his directorial debut, the Paul Thomas Anderson– and Wes Anderson-influenced “Ceremony” at the age of 26, the precocious filmmaker had, by that point, already directed episodes of David Wain’s “Wainy Days” and Michael Cera’s extremely underrated and influential web series, “Clark And Michael.” Normally a young filmmaker waiting seven years to make his next film might panic, but Winkler kept himself so busy between features, he likely didn’t have time to be anxious.

Continue reading Max Winkler Talks ‘Flower,’ Firecracker Star Zoey Deutch, Realist Influences & More [Tribeca Film Festival] at The Playlist. »

- Rodrigo Perez

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Colossal – Review

15 April 2017 7:56 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Review by Stephen Tronicek

Colossal is funny, terrifying and meaningful and unlike many high concept films, it actually earns all of those through more than superficial comedic lines and intense action on screen. It is a film about people, and about how people can use their own problems to warp them into monsters. It’s also a monster movie, and kind of a comedy and if that sounds like a lot for a movie to deal with, you’d be right. Does that stop Colossal from being something of a minor miracle? No.

Gloria (Anne Hathaway) is a wreck. She has been kicked out by her boyfriend, she’s back at home, she’s dealing with alcoholism and trying to befriend old hometown friends like Oscar (Jason Sudeikis). She just needs to get her life together. Sounds easy…until Gloria realizes that every single time she steps into a playground »

- Movie Geeks

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Attention, Filmmakers: Enter Francis Ford Coppola’s Short Film Competition And You Could Go to Sundance

13 April 2017 11:28 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Francis Ford Coppola Winery and the director’s literary magazine, Zoetrope: All Story, are now taking submissions for a new short film competition, to be judged by Roman Coppola. The five finalists will screen their films at a private event during the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. A grand prize of $5,000 will be awarded to a final winner.

Read More: Attention, Screenwriters: New Opportunities for Horror, TV and Women Over 40 — Roundup

“This is an opportunity for anyone who wants to share their creative vision through film but otherwise may have limited resources,” Roman Coppola said in a statement. “Through our competition, anyone can shoot a film on a smartphone.”

Read More: Francis Ford Coppola, Robert De Niro and Al Pacino Will Reunite for ‘The Godfather’ 45th Anniversary Celebration

Roman Coppola is one of the creators of the Amazon Prime series “Mozart in the Jungle” and the writer and producer of “The Darjeeling Limited. »

- Yoselin Acevedo

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In Praise of the Aesthetic Power of 16mm

12 April 2017 8:02 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

As more and more productions attempt to push for pristine clarity through using digital cinematography, there’s a specific aesthetic quality some filmmakers desire that simply can’t be achieved through these means. This week, one can see the ravishing, overwhelming power of Darius Khondji‘s 35mm work in The Lost City of Z, but today we’re taking a look at an even smaller width of film stock that can gave an even more intimate feel.

Recently used by Todd Haynes, Wes Anderson, Pablo Larraín, Kelly Reichardt, Alex Ross Perry, Danny Boyle, and more, 16mm (and Super 16mm) provides a grainy, lo-fi charm that gives an unmatched feel. In his latest video essay for The Royal Ocean Film Society, Andrew Saladino explores the aesthetic power of the decision to shoot in this format. He also shows how some directors attempt to pull off the look digitally, but it’s »

- Jordan Raup

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Biopics vs. Their Fictional Counterparts

11 April 2017 11:01 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Some people’s lives are best told truthfully, others more loosely.

In one corner, we have Rocky, the iconic Best Picture-winning boxing movie starring Sylvester Stallone as the made-up Rocky Balboa. In the other corner, we have Chuck, an upcoming biopic starring Liev Schreiber as real-life boxer Chuck Wepner. The latter primarily depicts the 1975 bout between Wepner and Muhammad Ali, which inspired Stallone to write the script for Rocky. He’s since tried to downplay the connection, especially after being sued by Wepner, but it’s close enough to being a film a clef as any.

Chuck received mostly positive reviews when it played the big film festivals last fall, but it’s unlikely to become the phenomenon, let alone Oscar darling, that Rocky was. Its legacy surely won’t be as lasting, in part because true biopics don’t tend to get sequels. There are a lot of benefits to fictionalized accounts of real events and »

- Christopher Campbell

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Paramount hires former Indian Paintbrush and Miramax executive

6 April 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Peter McPartlin joins major.

Paramount Pictures has named Peter McPartlin as executive vice president, strategic planning and business operations.

McPartlin joins from Us production outfit Indian Paintbrush, which has produced Wes Anderson’s The Darjeeling Limited and Moonrise Kingdom, where he was COO and executive vice president of business and legal affairs.

He has also previously served as vice president of business and legal affairs at Miramax Films.

At Paramount, McPartlin will report to COO Andrew Gumpert, and will have a remit of identifying new business opportunities for the company and evaluating potential investments.

Gumpert commented on the hire: “As an incredibly skilled strategic executive, with a terrific track record for identifying new business opportunities, Peter will be a tremendous asset to the studio. I’m thrilled to have him join me and the team at Paramount to continue to identify and grow opportunities across our divisions.”

McPartlin added: “It’s a very exciting time to join »

- tom.grater@screendaily.com (Tom Grater)

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Paramount hires former Indian Paintbrush and Miramax exec

6 April 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Peter McPartlin joins major.

Paramount Pictures has named Peter McPartlin as executive vice president, strategic planning and business operations.

McPartlin joins from Us production outfit Indian Paintbrush, which has produced Wes Anderson’s The Darjeeling Limited and Moonrise Kingdom, where he was COO and executive vice president of business and legal affairs.

He has also previously served as vice president of business and legal affairs at Miramax Films.

At Paramount, McPartlin will report to COO Andrew Gumpert, and will have a remit of identifying new business opportunities for the company and evaluating potential investments.

Gumpert commented on the hire: “As an incredibly skilled strategic executive, with a terrific track record for identifying new business opportunities, Peter will be a tremendous asset to the studio. I’m thrilled to have him join me and the team at Paramount to continue to identify and grow opportunities across our divisions.”

McPartlin added: “It’s a very exciting time to join »

- tom.grater@screendaily.com (Tom Grater)

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Rushes. Wes Anderson, Chicago's Crime Culture, Nicole Kidman, Walter Hill

5 April 2017 11:52 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveriesNEWSRadley Metzger's The Lickerish QuartetRadley Metzger, whose groundbreaking erotic films helped set standards of style for both mainstream and arthouse cinema, has died at 88. His classics Camille 2000 (1969) and The Lickerish Quartet (1970) were featured on Mubi last year. Critic and programmer Steve Macfarlane interviewed the director at Slant Magazine for the Film Society of Lincoln Center's 2014 retrospective devoted to Metzger.Recommended VIEWINGThe Cinémathèque française has been on a roll uploading video discussions that have taken place at their Paris cinema. This 34 minute talk is between Wes Anderson and director/producer Barbet Schroeder.The Criterion Collection has recently released a new edition of Michelangelo Antonioni's masterpiece Blow-Up, and has uploaded this stellar clip of actor David Hemmings speaking on a talk show about making the film.Recommended READINGHoward Hawks' ScarfaceHow does Chicago intertwine itself with crime and the culture created in the mix of the two? »

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Criminal Minds: Beyond Borders: Supernatural Duo Rob and Rich Speak on First Shared Network Episode & More!

5 April 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | TVfanatic | See recent TVfanatic news »

It's hard to believe the Kings of Con (Supernatural Con, that is) never shared an episode during the 12-season run that's helped to make them adored by so many.

But thanks to executive producer Adam Glass of Criminal Minds: Beyond Borders (who was also a producer on Supernatural from 2010-15), Rob Benedict and Richard Speight, Jr., have filmed their first episode of network television together!!

We had the opportunity to speak with both men about their guest starring roles, their friendship, the cross-pollination of the Supernatural family a lot more. Check out excerpts of our conversations with both Rob and Richard below.

On Criminal Minds: Beyond Borders Season 2 Episode 5, two American entrepreneurs, best friends, go missing when they go to Bangladesh to finalize a deal with regards to their new clothing line.

The Americans, Rob and David, are played by Richard Speight, Jr, and Rob Benedict, respectively. What were the »

- Carissa Pavlica

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IFC Center’s First Annual Split Screens Festival Celebrating TV to Debut in June

3 April 2017 2:07 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Television is getting its own week-long festival, thanks to IFC Center and Matt Zoller Seitz.

IFC Center announced the launch of its new annual event, the Split Screens Festival, taking place in June. The celebration will be curated by noted critic and author Matt Zoller Seitz.

“There is no better time to take a close look at television as an art form,” said Seitz in a statement. “Split Screens Festival will offer an intimate venue to examine the medium’s Platinum Age, which has perfected new storytelling techniques and created characters that seem as vivid to viewers as the flesh-and-blood people they know and love. It’s an honor to chronicle this amazing time as a critic, and I’m pleased to be spearheading this amazing festival with IFC Center.”

Read More: Tribeca Unveils TV Lineup for 2017 Film Festival

IFC Center’s Gm John Vanco added, “The accomplishments of artists »

- Hanh Nguyen

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15 Good Dark Comedies to Watch on Netflix in April 2017

31 March 2017 3:52 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

This is no festive prank, these movies are hilarious.

Let’s face it, the world is a wreck. Every day things look bleaker than they did the day before. It’s gotten to the point where, if you can’t learn to laugh at our misery, you’re finished. If you need some help figuring out how to find humor in even the worst bits of the human experience, dark comedies work, Netflix has them, and we’ve made a list of the good ones. Click on the films’ titles to be taken to their Netflix pages.

Pick of the Month: This Must Be the Place (2011)

I can’t think of another movie in recent times that’s been so good and gotten so little love and attention in return. Maybe that’s because the concept of a former 80s glam rocker who still wears his makeup (Sean Penn) tracking down the Nazi concentration camp guard who »

- Nathan Adams

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The Ultimate Video Essay Guide to Martin Scorsese

31 March 2017 2:02 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Everything you need to know about the director in one handy post.

Have a conversation with anyone, anywhere in the world about the greatest living filmmakers, and if the name “Martin Scorsese” isn’t one of the first two or three mentioned, leave that conversation immediately and never speak to that person again. Because Scorsese’s greatness isn’t up for debate, it just isn’t. For nearly a half-century now he has built film upon film into a diverse and heralded oeuvre that includes crime films (Mean Streets, Goodfellas, Casino, The Departed), intense character studies (Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore, Taxi Driver, The Aviator), religious epics (The Last Temptation of Christ, Kundun, Silence), documentaries (The Last Waltz, Public Speaking, A Letter to Elia), and rollicking tributes to art and artists (New York New York, Life Lessons, Hugo). There is no doubt that no matter who comes after him, Martin Scorsese »

- H. Perry Horton

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Film History Royalty: Jean-Pierre Léaud as Louis Xiv

31 March 2017 10:52 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The 400 Blows. Courtesy of ShutterstockFor many directors, casting decisions are a crucial part of the writing process. They set the parameters in which the character can develop itself. Fundamentally, a good casting decision can make a character transcend its own scripted ambitions into wonderful, unexpected territories. But bad casting, as we know, can cripple not just a character’s potential but the entire film. It’s hard to talk about casting choices as creative decisions since they are so ingrained within certain creative impulses—the decision of choosing a particular actor over another can be based on mere gut feeling, a hunch, or an intellectual response. But of course, it can also depend (as it often does in large budget films) on an actor’s status, reputation or his or her monetary value. As we get to know actors, we see them typecast or cast against type but sometimes »

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New to Streaming: ‘Right Now, Wrong Then,’ ‘The Life Aquatic,’ ‘The Discovery,’ and More

31 March 2017 6:53 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Blackcoat’s Daughter (Osgood Perkins)

Osgood Perkins’ debut feature, The Blackcoat’s Daughter – originally known as February at its premiere at Tiff last year – is a stylish exercise in dread, teasing out its slow-drip horrors with precision, and building a deliriously evil presence that hovers along the fringes. However, there’s a thin line between mystery and vagueness in storytelling, and it becomes difficult to decide where a »

- The Film Stage

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Legion episode 8 review: Chapter Eight

29 March 2017 8:17 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Nick Harley Mar 30, 2017

David faces the Shadow King in the epic season finale of Legion. Read our review here...

This review contains spoilers.

See related  James Moran interview: do screenwriters get short shrift?

Noah Hawley might have superpowers. After successfully shepherding the adaptation of a beloved film by perhaps the most accomplished and eclectic team of filmmakers from the past thirty years, he decided to tackle a C-list X-Men property. Just like Fargo, the comic character Legion comes with its own baggage and a fiercely devoted fan base that would be ready to go berserk like Wolverine if not handled with care. Factor in a superhero entertainment landscape that’s nearly been milked dry of original takes, and the prospect of creating a new X-Men adjacent TV series seems daunting. Yet Hawley was able to create a show that is spellbinding, mind-bending, and visually inventive, using the fragile mental state »

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6 Filmmaking Tips from Richard Kelly

29 March 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

The ‘Donnie Darko’ director imparts important Hollywood lessons.Richard Kelly on the set of ‘Southland Tales

It only takes one movie to make you a notable filmmaker, as we’ve seen with Richard Kelly. His 2001 debut feature, Donnie Darko, is a “mainstream cult classic,” if the oxymoron may be allowed. Initially a flop, the sci-fi teen movie is now popular enough to warrant a new 4K restoration and re-release in honor of its 15th anniversary last year.

He has made two other features, neither of them so successful, and hasn’t directed anything in eight years. But that one movie is enough to make him an expert on the good and bad of Hollywood, and fortunately he hasn’t become a curmudgeon sitting on the wayside, so we can still look to his lessons learned and the six tips collected below as positive guidance.

Take Risks

Kelly’s first two movies (the second is Southbound Tales) are »

- Christopher Campbell

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‘Inside Psycho’ Review: The Classic Hitchcock Film’s Origin Story is a Wicked Twist on Hollywood and True Crime Podcasts

28 March 2017 8:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Mark Ramsey knows that it’s sometimes best to hide the star of the show until the moment is absolutely right. It’s why, in the first episode of “Inside Psycho,” a new six-part series about the birth, production and aftermath of the 1960 horror classic, you won’t hear the words “shower” or “Leigh” or “Hitchcock” or “Universal.”

It’s a particularly striking debut, not just because of the delayed introduction of the expected cast of characters. In opening this “Psycho” origin story with a 25-minute overview of the life and crimes of Plainfield, Wisconsin serial killer Ed Gein, Ramsey makes an early case that the best path to understanding the film is via a circuitous route, one with an ever-changing narrative perspective. And plenty of “Mother.”

This trail, particularly in its opening salvo, is unapologetically soaked in goo and gore. (“The following contains mature content,” Ramsey explains at the top of the premiere. »

- Steve Greene

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‘Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story’ Clip: How One of Hollywood’s Unsung Heroes Made ‘The Birds’ Come Alive

28 March 2017 8:10 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Today is the fifty-forth anniversary of the release of Alfred Hitchcock’s classic horror film “The Birds,” and what better way to celebrate than watching one of the major contributors talk about his role on the film?

Read More: ‘Psycho’ Gets Woke: Rihanna’s ‘Bates Motel’ Shower Scene is a Progressive Twist on Hitchcock — Showrunner Interview

Harold Michelson was not only the storyboard artist on “The Birds,” but also one of the Hollywood Golden Age’s major unsung heroes, which makes him such a fitting and fascinating subject for Daniel Raim and Danny DeVito’s documentary “Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story.”

Michelson and his wife Lillian, a revered film researcher, quietly became the film industry’s secret weapons, though their contributions were largely uncredited, meaning that their story has never been told until now. The two were partially responsible for films like “The Graduate,” “Rosemary’s Baby,” and “Scarface. »

- Allison Picurro

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001 | 1998

1-20 of 114 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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