Edit
Gerry Anderson Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (3) | Trade Mark (1) | Trivia (10) | Personal Quotes (3)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 14 April 1929West Hampstead, London, England, UK
Date of Death 26 December 2012Henley-on-Thames, England, UK  (Alzheimer's disease)
Birth NameGerald Alexander Abrahams

Mini Bio (1)

Gerry Anderson was born on April 14, 1929 in West Hampstead, London, England as Gerald Alexander Abrahams. He was a writer and producer, known for Thunderbirds (1965), Space: 1999 (1975) and Journey to the Far Side of the Sun (1969). He was married to Mary Robins, Sylvia Anderson and Betty Wrightman. He died on December 26, 2012 in Henley-on-Thames, England.

Spouse (3)

Mary Robins (1975 - 26 December 2012) (his death) (1 child)
Sylvia Anderson (1962 - 1975) (divorced) (1 child)
Betty Wrightman (1952 - 1960) (divorced) (2 children)

Trade Mark (1)

Famous for his shows which employ "Supermarionation" - marionettes with control wires connected to interior mechanisms that control facial features and other functions of the puppets. However, since this kind of puppetry makes it difficult to depict them walking realistically, his shows are usually science fiction series that emphasize the characters operating futuristic vehicles.

Trivia (10)

Father of Jamie Anderson.
He was awarded the M.B.E. (Member of the Order of the British Empire) in the Queen's 2001 Birthday Honours List for his services to Animation.
Anderson's ancestral (from the Russian-Polish border) name was Bieloglovski. This was changed to "Abrahams" by a British immigration official in 1895. His mother, Deborah, changed it to "Anderson" because she liked the sound of it.
His film career started as a teenager under George Pearson at the Colonial Film Unit.
At one stage, Anderson employed a staff of 250 people, including designers and special effects artists. His company was bought out by Lew Grade in 1962, but he managed to retain creative control and received 10% of overall profits.
"The Thunderbirds" were named after Thunderbird Field, an Arizona airfield, where his elder brother first trained as a Mosquito pilot.
Came from an impoverished family and spent his early childhood living with his parents and older brother in a one-room flat with no running water.
His early work experience prior to becoming the master of "supermarionation" included being a fibrous plasterer (which he had to give up, because the lime gave him dermatitis), portrait photography and a job in air traffic control. He then joined the Ministry of Information as a film trainee and subsequently became a cutter at Gainsborough.
Died in a nursing home, on December 26, 2012, near Oxfordshire, England. Had suffered from Alzheimer's since 2010.
Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire, England [July 2008]

Personal Quotes (3)

The real tragedy of my life is that my son, Jamie, is a Doctor Who (1963) fan.
[on his famous puppet programs] I always used to think that they were terrible. I didn't see much on screen but the faults. I couldn't get a puppet to pick something up, or to walk. Their mouths were like letterboxes flapping open and shut. But I got to the point where I thought I'd better stop running down these pictures, because everybody in the world except me seems to like them.
I was shattered when I learnt the programmes had to be made with puppets as I'd illusions of making great pictures like Ben Hur. But there we were with no money, and an offer on the table. We had to take it. [on his reluctance to make his first puppet program, The Adventures of Twizzle (1957)]

See also

Other Works | Publicity Listings | Official Sites | Contact Info

Contribute to This Page